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Uruguay Elections

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NEWS
March 2, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Luis Alberto Lacalle became president of Uruguay and promised to revive its sagging economy. Uruguay, located between inflation-ravaged Argentina and Brazil, has grown visibly poorer in the past decade. As Lacalle, a 48-year-old lawyer, took the oath of office, jubilant supporters crowded the streets of Montevideo to hail the country's first president from the Blanco Party.
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WORLD
October 26, 2009 | Associated Press
A blunt-talking former guerrilla seeking to maintain the left's hold on power in Uruguay easily got the most votes in presidential elections Sunday, but failed to win the majority needed to avoid a runoff. Jose "Pepe" Mujica received about 48% of the votes compared with 30% for former President Luis Alberto Lacalle, a free-marketeer who wants to cut government and taxes and reduce alliances with Latin American leftists. Two voter initiatives -- one to remove amnesty for human rights abuses under the 1973-85 dictatorship and another to enable mail-in votes by citizens living outside Uruguay -- also failed to win majorities, according to exit polls by the companies Cifra, Factum and Equipos Mori.
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NEWS
December 27, 1988
Uruguay's Electoral Court confirmed that enough voters have signed petitions opposing a December, 1986, military amnesty law to force a referendum that could overturn it. The referendum probably will be held in April, said Juan Furest, one of nine members of the court. The amnesty law bars the prosecution of soldiers and police accused of human rights abuses during the 1973-85 military dictatorship's suppression of urban terrorism.
NEWS
November 29, 1999 | Reuters
Painting himself as a pillar of economic stability and keeping the center-right Colorado Party in power for another five years, Uruguay's Jorge Batlle won the South American country's presidential runoff election Sunday. With 100% of the votes counted, the Interior Ministry said Batlle, 72, won 52%, or 1,138,067 votes, to 44%, or 972,197 votes, for Tabare Vazquez, 59, who had hoped to become Uruguay's first socialist president.
NEWS
November 27, 1989 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the first unrestricted balloting in 18 years, Uruguayans on Sunday elected a moderate opposition leader as president, and voters in the capital chose a leftist physician backed by ex-guerrillas as mayor. Luis Lacalle of the National Party defeated Jorge Batlle of the ruling Colorado Party in the race to succeed President Julio Maria Sanguinetti.
NEWS
November 29, 1999 | Reuters
Painting himself as a pillar of economic stability and keeping the center-right Colorado Party in power for another five years, Uruguay's Jorge Batlle won the South American country's presidential runoff election Sunday. With 100% of the votes counted, the Interior Ministry said Batlle, 72, won 52%, or 1,138,067 votes, to 44%, or 972,197 votes, for Tabare Vazquez, 59, who had hoped to become Uruguay's first socialist president.
NEWS
November 28, 1994 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former President Julio Maria Sanguinetti won the presidential election in a close, three-way contest Sunday, according to projections based on incomplete official returns. Sanguinetti, 58, and his traditional Colorado Party defeated the governing National, or Blanco (White), Party and the leftist Broad Front coalition, the polling firm Cifras declared. Its projections gave the Colorados 33.
NEWS
November 28, 1989 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leftist parties that include former guerrillas and political prisoners celebrated dramatic election gains Monday and claimed to have broken Uruguay's traditional two-party system. The National Party, the perennial underdog of the two main centrist parties, won the presidency from the long-dominant Colorado Party in Sunday's elections. The Colorados also suffered serious setbacks in congressional and mayoral races around the country.
NEWS
November 27, 1994 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Uruguayans elect a new president today, and the chance that a socialist could win has injected extra excitement into the race. This is the first time in Uruguayan history that a leftist coalition has seriously challenged the country's two traditional parties for national power. Pollsters and commentators say the three-way presidential contest is too close to call.
WORLD
October 26, 2009 | Associated Press
A blunt-talking former guerrilla seeking to maintain the left's hold on power in Uruguay easily got the most votes in presidential elections Sunday, but failed to win the majority needed to avoid a runoff. Jose "Pepe" Mujica received about 48% of the votes compared with 30% for former President Luis Alberto Lacalle, a free-marketeer who wants to cut government and taxes and reduce alliances with Latin American leftists. Two voter initiatives -- one to remove amnesty for human rights abuses under the 1973-85 dictatorship and another to enable mail-in votes by citizens living outside Uruguay -- also failed to win majorities, according to exit polls by the companies Cifra, Factum and Equipos Mori.
NEWS
November 28, 1994 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former President Julio Maria Sanguinetti won the presidential election in a close, three-way contest Sunday, according to projections based on incomplete official returns. Sanguinetti, 58, and his traditional Colorado Party defeated the governing National, or Blanco (White), Party and the leftist Broad Front coalition, the polling firm Cifras declared. Its projections gave the Colorados 33.
NEWS
November 27, 1994 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Uruguayans elect a new president today, and the chance that a socialist could win has injected extra excitement into the race. This is the first time in Uruguayan history that a leftist coalition has seriously challenged the country's two traditional parties for national power. Pollsters and commentators say the three-way presidential contest is too close to call.
NEWS
March 2, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Luis Alberto Lacalle became president of Uruguay and promised to revive its sagging economy. Uruguay, located between inflation-ravaged Argentina and Brazil, has grown visibly poorer in the past decade. As Lacalle, a 48-year-old lawyer, took the oath of office, jubilant supporters crowded the streets of Montevideo to hail the country's first president from the Blanco Party.
NEWS
November 28, 1989 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leftist parties that include former guerrillas and political prisoners celebrated dramatic election gains Monday and claimed to have broken Uruguay's traditional two-party system. The National Party, the perennial underdog of the two main centrist parties, won the presidency from the long-dominant Colorado Party in Sunday's elections. The Colorados also suffered serious setbacks in congressional and mayoral races around the country.
NEWS
November 27, 1989 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the first unrestricted balloting in 18 years, Uruguayans on Sunday elected a moderate opposition leader as president, and voters in the capital chose a leftist physician backed by ex-guerrillas as mayor. Luis Lacalle of the National Party defeated Jorge Batlle of the ruling Colorado Party in the race to succeed President Julio Maria Sanguinetti.
NEWS
December 27, 1988
Uruguay's Electoral Court confirmed that enough voters have signed petitions opposing a December, 1986, military amnesty law to force a referendum that could overturn it. The referendum probably will be held in April, said Juan Furest, one of nine members of the court. The amnesty law bars the prosecution of soldiers and police accused of human rights abuses during the 1973-85 military dictatorship's suppression of urban terrorism.
WORLD
May 6, 2004 | Henry Chu, Times Staff Writer
Days before the landslide election of a former leftist firebrand to the presidency of South America's largest country, U.S. Rep. Henry J. Hyde warned the White House of a new "axis of evil" in the United States' backyard. Victory for Brazil's Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva would add another link to the chain of hostile leaders stretching from Cuba through Venezuela and down to Brazil, the Illinois Republican wrote in October 2002.
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