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October 7, 1987
Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze held an unexpected meeting on a street in Montevideo, Uruguay, with about 200 people demonstrating on behalf of Soviet Jews seeking to emigrate. Shevardnadze, in Uruguay for a two-day state visit, had just finished talks with President Julio Sanguinetti when he noticed the demonstrators across from the Soviet Embassy. He crossed the street and asked to speak with the group.
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NEWS
October 7, 1987
Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze held an unexpected meeting on a street in Montevideo, Uruguay, with about 200 people demonstrating on behalf of Soviet Jews seeking to emigrate. Shevardnadze, in Uruguay for a two-day state visit, had just finished talks with President Julio Sanguinetti when he noticed the demonstrators across from the Soviet Embassy. He crossed the street and asked to speak with the group.
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NEWS
September 26, 1987 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze arrives in Brazil today on a three-nation mission aimed at strengthening the Soviet Union's ties with South America. Shevardnadze is the highest Soviet official ever to visit Brazil, South America's largest nation. From here he will go to Argentina, the continent's second-largest country, and then to neighboring Uruguay. Some analysts say the diplomatic overture stems from Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev's glasnost policy.
NEWS
September 26, 1987 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze arrives in Brazil today on a three-nation mission aimed at strengthening the Soviet Union's ties with South America. Shevardnadze is the highest Soviet official ever to visit Brazil, South America's largest nation. From here he will go to Argentina, the continent's second-largest country, and then to neighboring Uruguay. Some analysts say the diplomatic overture stems from Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev's glasnost policy.
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