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NEWS
March 30, 1987 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, Times Staff Writer
Placards demanding justice vie with street vendors for attention on the dowdy streets of a divided city. Hand-sewn leather slippers, plump sausages and glittering chunks of amethyst crystal compete with calls for a referendum. "Simply to declare people free of guilt cannot remove guilt," law student Karlina Batthytany said, leaning on a scarred old school desk to sign a petition that would defy Uruguay's government and its elected Congress.
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NEWS
January 28, 2001 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This small, quiet, slow-moving nation doesn't make much news. That's part of being a small, quiet, slow-moving nation. But Uruguayan President Jorge Batlle has figured out a way to make headlines. He has become the first head of state in the region, and one of the few anywhere, to call for the decriminalization of illicit drugs. Batlle, a blunt free-market reformer, questions the costs and effectiveness of a drug war whose primary theater of battle is Latin America.
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BUSINESS
April 25, 1989 | JAMES F. SMITH, Times Staff Writer
After resolving a tormented debate on its past, Uruguay is again looking forward and is confronting choices on how to build on its comparative well-being in a region of economic basket cases. With traditional prudence, tiny Uruguay has largely avoided the crippling inflation and costly overindulgence of its huge neighbors, Argentina and Brazil. Indeed, it has long capitalized on its neighbors' failings, attracting hundreds of millions of their dollars into its stable banking system.
NEWS
November 29, 1999 | Reuters
Painting himself as a pillar of economic stability and keeping the center-right Colorado Party in power for another five years, Uruguay's Jorge Batlle won the South American country's presidential runoff election Sunday. With 100% of the votes counted, the Interior Ministry said Batlle, 72, won 52%, or 1,138,067 votes, to 44%, or 972,197 votes, for Tabare Vazquez, 59, who had hoped to become Uruguay's first socialist president.
NEWS
November 27, 1989 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the first unrestricted balloting in 18 years, Uruguayans on Sunday elected a moderate opposition leader as president, and voters in the capital chose a leftist physician backed by ex-guerrillas as mayor. Luis Lacalle of the National Party defeated Jorge Batlle of the ruling Colorado Party in the race to succeed President Julio Maria Sanguinetti.
NEWS
November 29, 1999 | Reuters
Painting himself as a pillar of economic stability and keeping the center-right Colorado Party in power for another five years, Uruguay's Jorge Batlle won the South American country's presidential runoff election Sunday. With 100% of the votes counted, the Interior Ministry said Batlle, 72, won 52%, or 1,138,067 votes, to 44%, or 972,197 votes, for Tabare Vazquez, 59, who had hoped to become Uruguay's first socialist president.
NEWS
June 19, 1993 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The disappearance of a Chilean scientist has stirred the ashes of repressive military rule in South America, uncovering live coals of hate and fear. Although elected civilians now govern the continent, worried Uruguayans say the mysterious case of Eugenio Berrios could signal a return of Operation Condor, an international network of ruthless intelligence agencies that served bygone dictatorships. Berrios, a biochemical engineer, worked for the notorious secret police of Gen.
NEWS
January 28, 2001 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This small, quiet, slow-moving nation doesn't make much news. That's part of being a small, quiet, slow-moving nation. But Uruguayan President Jorge Batlle has figured out a way to make headlines. He has become the first head of state in the region, and one of the few anywhere, to call for the decriminalization of illicit drugs. Batlle, a blunt free-market reformer, questions the costs and effectiveness of a drug war whose primary theater of battle is Latin America.
NEWS
December 1, 1990 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The most flamboyant of the new South American presidents is Argentina's Carlos Saul Menem, a lady's man with fluffy two-tone sideburns and a flair for the dramatic gesture. He has locked his estranged wife out of the official residence, sold off the government telephone network and sent two warships to help out the United States in the Persian Gulf. Patricio Aylwin of Chile is more conventional, a grandfatherly type in a gray suit, good at smoothing over rough moments.
NEWS
April 29, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Raul Sendic, founder and leader of Uruguay's Tupamaros, once the world's most successful urban guerrilla movements, has died in a Paris hospital, medical sources said Friday. He was 64. Sendic, captured in 1972 and jailed on charges of committing terrorist acts that had convulsed Uruguay for nearly a decade, was among the last group of political prisoners freed under amnesty after Uruguay's return to civilian rule in 1985. He flew to France in February for medical treatment. The hospital declined immediate comment on the cause of his death, but sources close to the former guerrilla leader said that he suffered from a neurological ailment linked to mistreatment at the hands of his jailers during his years in prison.
NEWS
June 19, 1993 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The disappearance of a Chilean scientist has stirred the ashes of repressive military rule in South America, uncovering live coals of hate and fear. Although elected civilians now govern the continent, worried Uruguayans say the mysterious case of Eugenio Berrios could signal a return of Operation Condor, an international network of ruthless intelligence agencies that served bygone dictatorships. Berrios, a biochemical engineer, worked for the notorious secret police of Gen.
NEWS
December 1, 1990 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The most flamboyant of the new South American presidents is Argentina's Carlos Saul Menem, a lady's man with fluffy two-tone sideburns and a flair for the dramatic gesture. He has locked his estranged wife out of the official residence, sold off the government telephone network and sent two warships to help out the United States in the Persian Gulf. Patricio Aylwin of Chile is more conventional, a grandfatherly type in a gray suit, good at smoothing over rough moments.
NEWS
November 27, 1989 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the first unrestricted balloting in 18 years, Uruguayans on Sunday elected a moderate opposition leader as president, and voters in the capital chose a leftist physician backed by ex-guerrillas as mayor. Luis Lacalle of the National Party defeated Jorge Batlle of the ruling Colorado Party in the race to succeed President Julio Maria Sanguinetti.
BUSINESS
April 25, 1989 | JAMES F. SMITH, Times Staff Writer
After resolving a tormented debate on its past, Uruguay is again looking forward and is confronting choices on how to build on its comparative well-being in a region of economic basket cases. With traditional prudence, tiny Uruguay has largely avoided the crippling inflation and costly overindulgence of its huge neighbors, Argentina and Brazil. Indeed, it has long capitalized on its neighbors' failings, attracting hundreds of millions of their dollars into its stable banking system.
NEWS
March 30, 1987 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, Times Staff Writer
Placards demanding justice vie with street vendors for attention on the dowdy streets of a divided city. Hand-sewn leather slippers, plump sausages and glittering chunks of amethyst crystal compete with calls for a referendum. "Simply to declare people free of guilt cannot remove guilt," law student Karlina Batthytany said, leaning on a scarred old school desk to sign a petition that would defy Uruguay's government and its elected Congress.
NEWS
March 1, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
President Daniel Ortega of Nicaragua and Secretary of State George P. Shultz will meet Saturday to discuss the possibility of reviving Central American peace negotiations, U.S. officials said today. Ortega and Shultz are in Uruguay for the inauguration today of President Julio Sanguinetti.
OPINION
March 11, 1990 | Jacobo Timerman, Jacobo Timerman is an Argentine author, editor and publisher
The ghost of Francisco Franco haunts the Chilean military. In Spain, the dictator died convinced that he had tied up all the loose ends, and tied them well. But in the months following his death, Franco's veil of empty power was unraveled by the Spanish citizenry. In Chile, dictator Augusto Pinochet and his partisans also believe they have tied up all the loose ends, making the new democratic government a mere appendage of the military.
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