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June 5, 1989 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., Times Staff Writer
Just days after expressing confidence that conditions for U.S. companies in China would not worsen as a result of unrest there, some observers predicted Sunday--after a weekend of violence--that American firms could find their Chinese operations impaired for a year or more. "I don't think any of us expect a quick end to the hostilities," said Eric T. Kalkhurst, a business consultant in neighboring Hong Kong whose clients include small and medium-size American and European investment groups.
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BUSINESS
March 23, 2010 | By David Pierson
In a case that has become a flash point for the foreign business climate in China, an Australian mining executive admitted Monday to taking bribes while working as a chief iron-ore negotiator in China. Australian Stern Hu and three Chinese employees of the British-Australian mining giant Rio Tinto Group have been held since July, accused of stealing commercial secrets and accepting millions of dollars in bribes. The charges have been embarrassing for Rio Tinto, a major provider of iron ore to China, as it has sought to develop better relations with the country's leaders.
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NEWS
May 24, 1989 | From Associated Press
China's political upheaval has prompted many U.S. companies to postpone executives' visits or evacuate some staff members and dependents until the crisis eases, but none yet appear to be rethinking long-term strategies for doing business there. "There's a lot of hand-wringing going on. But companies are intelligent enough not to make decisions in that environment," said Roger Sullivan, president of the U.S.-China Business Council, a Washington-based association of American companies that trade with China or are partners in Chinese factories.
BUSINESS
June 20, 1989 | NANCY YOSHIHARA and GREGORY CROUCH, Times Staff Writers
James Spear, his wife Liang and their two children took off from Ontario International Airport at 9 a.m. Monday, bound for Beijing. Spear was returning to his job as manager of an international subsidiary of Unison Group, a San Bruno, Calif., company that advises foreign firms about doing business in China. "He felt the Japanese hadn't pulled out many of their businessmen," said his father, James Spear Sr. "He felt for the long term he should be there." The decision has his parents, who live in Covina, worried.
BUSINESS
June 11, 1989 | JONATHAN PETERSON, Times Staff Writer
When Jerome A. Cohen first tried to teach the ABCs of business law in Beijing a decade ago, the task left him, well, speechless. "We weren't even sure what words to use in Chinese," recalled the attorney whose efforts helped pioneer modern U.S. business dealings in China. "There wasn't even agreement on the word for 'contract.' How did you express 'offer' and 'acceptance?' " Despite the awkward start, American companies found the world's most populous nation to be an increasingly valued--if perplexing--business partner.
BUSINESS
May 26, 1989 | BILL SING, Times Staff Writer
Recent unrest in China has disrupted some Chinese operations of major California-based companies, as firms report slowdowns in Beijing and Shanghai but few problems anywhere else in that nation or in neighboring Hong Kong. A few California firms surveyed this week reported that their Beijing offices had been temporarily shut down because of traffic jams or other problems. Some firms also have suffered slowdowns in sales in Beijing and Shanghai or in worker productivity, as employees take breaks to discuss or participate in the political upheaval.
BUSINESS
June 20, 1989 | NANCY YOSHIHARA and GREGORY CROUCH, Times Staff Writers
James Spear, his wife Liang and their two children took off from Ontario International Airport at 9 a.m. Monday, bound for Beijing. Spear was returning to his job as manager of an international subsidiary of Unison Group, a San Bruno, Calif., company that advises foreign firms about doing business in China. "He felt the Japanese hadn't pulled out many of their businessmen," said his father, James Spear Sr. "He felt for the long term he should be there." The decision has his parents, who live in Covina, worried.
BUSINESS
March 23, 2010 | By David Pierson
In a case that has become a flash point for the foreign business climate in China, an Australian mining executive admitted Monday to taking bribes while working as a chief iron-ore negotiator in China. Australian Stern Hu and three Chinese employees of the British-Australian mining giant Rio Tinto Group have been held since July, accused of stealing commercial secrets and accepting millions of dollars in bribes. The charges have been embarrassing for Rio Tinto, a major provider of iron ore to China, as it has sought to develop better relations with the country's leaders.
NEWS
June 6, 1989 | From Associated Press
Major American businesses said Monday they are evacuating workers from China because of the army's massacre of civilians, and some U.S. airlines are altering schedules to avoid layovers in the country. General Electric Co., International Business Machines Corp. and American Telephone & Telegraph Co. are among the companies moving out employees. "Anyone who approaches a window risks his life," said international lawyer Jerome Cohen, referring to apparently random shooting in the capital.
BUSINESS
March 23, 2001 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what appeared to some to be a blatant effort to curry favor with China, James Murdoch, heir to the News Corp. media empire, called the Falun Gong spiritual movement a "dangerous" and "apocalyptic cult" and lambasted the Western press for its negative portrayal of that giant Asian nation.
BUSINESS
June 11, 1989 | JONATHAN PETERSON, Times Staff Writer
When Jerome A. Cohen first tried to teach the ABCs of business law in Beijing a decade ago, the task left him, well, speechless. "We weren't even sure what words to use in Chinese," recalled the attorney whose efforts helped pioneer modern U.S. business dealings in China. "There wasn't even agreement on the word for 'contract.' How did you express 'offer' and 'acceptance?' " Despite the awkward start, American companies found the world's most populous nation to be an increasingly valued--if perplexing--business partner.
NEWS
June 5, 1989 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., Times Staff Writer
Just days after expressing confidence that conditions for U.S. companies in China would not worsen as a result of unrest there, some observers predicted Sunday--after a weekend of violence--that American firms could find their Chinese operations impaired for a year or more. "I don't think any of us expect a quick end to the hostilities," said Eric T. Kalkhurst, a business consultant in neighboring Hong Kong whose clients include small and medium-size American and European investment groups.
BUSINESS
May 26, 1989 | BILL SING, Times Staff Writer
Recent unrest in China has disrupted some Chinese operations of major California-based companies, as firms report slowdowns in Beijing and Shanghai but few problems anywhere else in that nation or in neighboring Hong Kong. A few California firms surveyed this week reported that their Beijing offices had been temporarily shut down because of traffic jams or other problems. Some firms also have suffered slowdowns in sales in Beijing and Shanghai or in worker productivity, as employees take breaks to discuss or participate in the political upheaval.
NEWS
May 24, 1989 | From Associated Press
China's political upheaval has prompted many U.S. companies to postpone executives' visits or evacuate some staff members and dependents until the crisis eases, but none yet appear to be rethinking long-term strategies for doing business there. "There's a lot of hand-wringing going on. But companies are intelligent enough not to make decisions in that environment," said Roger Sullivan, president of the U.S.-China Business Council, a Washington-based association of American companies that trade with China or are partners in Chinese factories.
BUSINESS
January 25, 1993 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was one of the regular staples of President Clinton's campaign for the White House: attacking the Bush Administration for "coddling the dictators of Beijing." Along with that denunciation came Clinton's oft-proclaimed endorsement of congressional efforts to make the annual extensions of China's trade benefits in this country conditional on improvements in Beijing's human rights, trade and arms-export policies.
NEWS
May 28, 1994 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the end, China's success in overcoming human rights opposition to win renewal of trade privileges from the United States boiled down to one simple truth: The Chinese regime demonstrated a much better understanding of the American political system than the Clinton Administration did of the Chinese system. The key to Beijing's strategy was to divert attention from human rights issues by using the blinding lights of China's booming economy and huge potential market.
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