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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 1995
Henry Kissinger believes, according to the headline on his July 23 Opinion piece, that "China, America Need Time-Out to Cool Off." But it was Beijing, not Washington, that provoked the present crisis by its overblown response to Taiwan President Lee Teng-hui's recent private visit to the U.S., recalling its ambassador for consultations and arresting human rights activist Harry Wu on bogus charges of espionage. China's increasing swagger on the international stage is a consequence of its burgeoning economy and rapidly growing military might.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 2001
I find it interesting (and hypocritical) that Tang Jiaxuan, the foreign minister of China, is criticizing the U.S. for considering a missile defense system (Commentary, April 2). Perhaps in his next commentary he would be so kind as to explain to the American people how China has "engaged in fruitful cooperation over the nonproliferation of weapons of mass destruction and missiles" by providing missiles and technological expertise to the "few so-called problem states" we are trying to protect ourselves against.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1997
"China Hosted Several Lawmakers, Records Show" (June 14) asserts that the National Committee on U.S.-China Relations "receives money from the Chinese government." This simply is not true. We have never received any revenue from the Chinese government or its intermediaries (or from Taiwan). The article errs when it says the committee recently sent more than one group of members of Congress to China: We have sent one group in our 30-year history. We are a public education organization and the overwhelming bulk of our exchange activity involves sending and receiving a wide variety of American, Chinese, Taiwanese and Hong Kong civic and public-sector leaders.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1997
"China Hosted Several Lawmakers, Records Show" (June 14) asserts that the National Committee on U.S.-China Relations "receives money from the Chinese government." This simply is not true. We have never received any revenue from the Chinese government or its intermediaries (or from Taiwan). The article errs when it says the committee recently sent more than one group of members of Congress to China: We have sent one group in our 30-year history. We are a public education organization and the overwhelming bulk of our exchange activity involves sending and receiving a wide variety of American, Chinese, Taiwanese and Hong Kong civic and public-sector leaders.
NEWS
December 20, 1989 | JIM MANN and JIM GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
With the disclosure of a secret top-level mission to Beijing only a month after the Tian An Men Square massacre, the Bush Administration's gambit to cultivate public acceptance for improving Sino-American relations appears to have backfired. China is now rapidly becoming a divisive and partisan issue in American politics again, making it especially unlikely that the two countries can return to the close relationship they enjoyed in the late 1970s and throughout most of the '80s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 1986
Laurance Liu, a Los Angeles restaurateur credited with paving the way for the Los Angeles/Canton Sister City program and who also helped negotiate the visits of Giant Pandas and Golden Monkeys to the city's zoo, has died in Hong Kong, it was learned this week. A memorial service for Liu, who died of a viral infection at age 43 on Sept. 11, is scheduled at the City Council Chamber at 4 p.m. today.
NEWS
March 7, 2001 | JIM MANN
Come have a look, the Chinese government proclaims to the world. Come see for yourself how things in China aren't so bad. Come observe how our country is changing. This is the misleading message China puts out whenever it wants something from abroad--in the past, when its trade benefits were in doubt in the U.S. Congress, and now when it is trying to land the 2008 Summer Olympics for Beijing. It would be a fair enough offer if China extended it equally to everyone.
OPINION
July 16, 1995 | Xiao-huang Yin, Xiao-huang Yin is an assistant professor at Occidental College and an associate of the Fairbank Center for East Asian Research at Harvard University
In just one month, Sino-American relations have gravely deteriorated. China has canceled all high-level official visits between the two, countries, summoned home its ambassador to Washington, reportedly resumed exporting missiles to Pakistan and Iran and delayed its approval of President Bill Clinton's nominee to replace the departed U.S. Ambassador J. Stapleton Roy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1997 | SOLOMON MOORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. and China relations have long stumbled over human rights, trade and arms reduction. Add to that list of differences, the Boy Scouts of America. Hoping to someday end China's decades-old ban on Scouting, a group of San Fernando and San Gabriel valley Scouts are heading eastward today to show educators in four of China's largest cities what U.S. Scouts do, including such activities as Native American dances and flag salute ceremonies.
NEWS
December 20, 1989 | JIM MANN and JIM GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
With the disclosure of a secret top-level mission to Beijing only a month after the Tian An Men Square massacre, the Bush Administration's gambit to cultivate public acceptance for improving Sino-American relations appears to have backfired. China is now rapidly becoming a divisive and partisan issue in American politics again, making it especially unlikely that the two countries can return to the close relationship they enjoyed in the late 1970s and throughout most of the '80s.
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