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BUSINESS
January 29, 1997 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
A federal lawsuit brought by two executives of US Healthcare who alleged that reporters for the television newsmagazine "Inside Edition" had invaded their privacy has been dismissed after the parties agreed to settle. The executives, the daughter and son-in-law of company Chairman Leonard Abramson, had accused reporters for "Inside Edition" of invading their privacy as they prepared an investigative report, aired last April, which focused on the high salaries paid to some HMO executives.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 6, 2014 | By Noam N. Levey
WASHINGTON - Soaring healthcare spending - which helped pave the way for President Obama's health law - continued to moderate in 2012, the fourth year of a historic slowdown in how much the nation pays for medical treatment, according to a new government report. Overall spending on healthcare rose less than 4% in 2012, less than half the rate of a decade ago, independent economists at the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services concluded. And for only the third time in the last 15 years, health spending rose more slowly than the overall economy.
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NATIONAL
September 9, 2009 | James Oliphant and Kim Geiger
As President Obama and his critics prepare for a climactic battle over healthcare, they face a seeming paradox: Millions of Americans say the system they depend on for everything from routine flu shots to life-saving heart surgery is broken and needs fixing. Yet most Americans also say they're pretty satisfied with their healthcare. The explanation for the apparent contradiction -- and a big reason healthcare has turned into such an incendiary fight -- is that it's not one crisis, it's a bundle of crises.
OPINION
January 17, 2013
Gov. Jerry Brown has thrown his support behind expanding Medi-Cal, the health insurance program for impoverished Californians, to the full extent authorized by the 2010 federal healthcare reform law. It was the right choice, and Brown deserves credit for recognizing that the benefits to public health and the economy outweigh the potential costs. But his budget proposal left state lawmakers to decide whether to keep responsibility for the expanded program in Sacramento or hand it off to the counties.
OPINION
July 20, 2012 | By Dalibor Rohac
When it comes to healthcare, Americans are not getting a lot of value for their money. The United States spends 17.6% of its gross domestic product, nearly twice the average of the nations in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. But life expectancy in the United States in 2010, at 78.7 years, is below the OECD average of 79.8 years. The U.S. infant mortality rate is higher than in most developed countries - it is higher than the rates in Greece, Hungary and Slovakia.
BUSINESS
January 10, 1998 | (Associated Press)
Aetna US Healthcare, a pioneer in covering infertility treatment, will eliminate benefits for advanced infertility procedures such as in-vitro fertilization, the Philadelphia Inquirer reported. The Blue Bell, Pa.-based health insurer, the nation's largest, said it is acting because too many people were attracted to its plans only to take advantage of the the expensive treatment.
OPINION
February 13, 2005
Re "Healthcare Costs Take Big Bite From Economy," Feb. 9: The report by the Boston University School of Public Health says: "The U.S. is a nation of incrementalists and tinkerers, not of ideologues." What nonsense! It is only ideology-driven propaganda that prevents us from weighing the merits of universal healthcare coverage. Meanwhile, until we learn to thumb our noses at ideology, I guess we can just go on paying twice the average per person cost of healthcare of such countries as Canada, France, Germany, Italy and Britain -- "countries that guarantee healthcare for all their citizens."
OPINION
November 24, 2004
The Nov. 19 Steve Lopez column, "A Family's Struggle, a Nation's Shame," cites the tragedy of a uninsured cancer patient that is magnified thousands of times all over this nation. I well remember being in a religious sanctuary in the 1950s when the hat was being passed to help pay the medical bills of a retired clergyman whose wife came down with cancer. Medicare has thankfully ended this hideous problem for seniors 65 and older. It is time to extend a Medicare program to the entire population of this nation.
NEWS
June 30, 2011 | By Noam N. Levey, Washington Bureau / For the Booster Shots blog
Spending on healthcare in the United States continued to far outpace other industrialized countries in 2009, according to a new tally by the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. Healthcare spending in the U.S. accounted for 17.4% of the nation's total economic output, nearly twice the average of 34 OECD countries, the OECD found. The next biggest health spender - the Netherlands - spent just 12% of its gross domestic product on medical care. Spending per capita on healthcare, which hit $7,960 in 2009, also far exceeded that of even some of the richest countries in Western Europe.
NEWS
October 18, 2011 | Noam N. Levey
The U.S. healthcare system is lagging further and further behind other industrialized countries on major measures of quality, efficiency and access to care, according to a new report from the nonprofit Commonwealth Fund, a leading health policy foundation. That is having a profound effect on overall health in the U.S., the report found. Americans die far more frequently than their counterparts in other countries as a result of preventable or treatable conditions, such as bacterial infections, screenable cancers, diabetes and complications from surgery.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Cogent, convincing, determinedly non-ideological, "Escape Fire: The Fight to Rescue American Healthcare" tells us that everything we think we know about that incendiary topic might be wrong. And it offers us a way out of the morass. And a morass it certainly is. We spend huge amounts of money on healthcare - a staggering $2.7 trillion in 2011 with no reductions in sight - and do not have as much to show for it as we should. We spend $8,000 per capita on healthcare while the rest of the developed world spends $3,000, but our population is not nearly as healthy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 2012 | By Anh Do, Los Angeles Times
A group of Filipino nurses who claimed they were mocked for their accents and ordered to speak "English only" won a nearly $1-million settlement against a Central California hospital where bosses and co-workers were allegedly urged to eavesdrop on the immigrant workers. The $975,000 settlement, announced Monday by lawyers from the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, is believed to be the largest language discrimination settlement in the U.S. healthcare industry, according to the Asian Pacific American Legal Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2012 | By Mark Olsen, Los Angeles Times
Looking at the titles of some of the fall's most noted documentaries, one could get an impression of a world spiraling desperately out of control. With titles such as "The House I Live In," Eugene Jarecki's Sundance-prize winning examination of the war on drugs opening Oct. 5; "How to Survive a Plague," David France's look at AIDS activism (Sept. 21); "Escape Fire: The Fight to Rescue American Healthcare," Matthew Heineman and Susan Froemke's take on U.S. healthcare (Oct. 5); and "Detropia," Heidi Ewing and Rachel Grady's exploration of Detroit as a focal point of economic and social change (Oct.
OPINION
July 20, 2012 | By Dalibor Rohac
When it comes to healthcare, Americans are not getting a lot of value for their money. The United States spends 17.6% of its gross domestic product, nearly twice the average of the nations in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. But life expectancy in the United States in 2010, at 78.7 years, is below the OECD average of 79.8 years. The U.S. infant mortality rate is higher than in most developed countries - it is higher than the rates in Greece, Hungary and Slovakia.
BUSINESS
June 20, 2012 | By Chad Terhune, Anna Gorman and Erin Loury, Los Angeles Times
If the Supreme Court scraps the Affordable Care Act in the coming days, California will lose out on as much as $15 billion annually in new federal money slated to come its way, dealing what state officials say would be a critical blow to efforts to expand coverage to the poor and uninsured. The state is one of the biggest beneficiaries of the federal healthcare law because of its large number of uninsured residents - about 7 million people, or nearly 20% of California's population.
BUSINESS
May 3, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
Healthcare in the United States is the most expensive in the world, but it's not the best, according to new research. For each person, the U.S. spent $7,690 on medical care in 2009, according to data from the Commonwealth Fund research group. That was 17% of GDP at the time and the most of the 13 nations in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, or OECD. Healthcare spending in the U.S. was three times more than in Japan, the country with the lowest costs.
NEWS
January 6, 2014 | By Noam N. Levey
WASHINGTON - Soaring healthcare spending - which helped pave the way for President Obama's health law - continued to moderate in 2012, the fourth year of a historic slowdown in how much the nation pays for medical treatment, according to a new government report. Overall spending on healthcare rose less than 4% in 2012, less than half the rate of a decade ago, independent economists at the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services concluded. And for only the third time in the last 15 years, health spending rose more slowly than the overall economy.
BUSINESS
January 9, 2012 | By Laurie McGinley, Los Angeles Times
U.S. healthcare spending grew at the second-lowest rate on record in 2010 as recession-spooked consumers avoided going to the doctor, taking expensive prescription drugs and undergoing costly elective procedures. Public and private healthcare spending totaled $2.6 trillion, representing 17.9% of the U.S. economy, the same proportion as in 2009, according to a government report released Monday. That was a sharp departure from previous years, when healthcare consumed ever-larger shares of the economic pie. But analysts said spending was likely to pick up as the economy improved and the healthcare law passed under President Obama begins to expand coverage to millions of people now uninsured.
OPINION
March 19, 2012
Signs of life Re " Ancient symbols speak to prisoner ," Column One, March 14 Having read a number of letters over time from Timothy Fenstermacher in the Biblical Archaeology Review, it was a genuine pleasure to "meet" him through the article in The Times. I wish him well - he is an inspiration to those who want to turn their lives around but don't know where to start. As a teacher, it reinforces the message I try to give my students: Education is the key, not necessarily to riches but to success.
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