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OPINION
July 9, 1995
Re "U.S., Japan Reach Trade Pact on Cars," June 29: The accord was a thinly veiled "political" victory for both countries. It does not do much for the United States but satisfies some of the union people and sounds good. The battle to open Japan (which has a relatively closed market) was fought publicly on the wrong product since U.S. auto manufacturers have not marketed the right size, not changed steering column placement, etc., while European suppliers have done their homework.
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NEWS
October 18, 1997 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Averting an unprecedented shipping ban that would have thrown transpacific trade into turmoil, top U.S. and Japanese negotiators reached a tentative accord late Friday designed to give U.S. and other foreign shippers greater access to Japanese ports. The agreement in principle was finalized hours before the Federal Maritime Commission was to block Japanese container ships from entering U.S.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 1992
Edward N. Luttwak's Opinion piece (Dec. 29) is a dismaying reflection of the ignorance of even the most impressively credentialed "experts" on trade with Japan. His characterization of a monolithic Japan Inc. is a common theme of the paranoid writers and politicians who want to create an easy target for the current problems of the U.S. economy. If he looked at a few facts he might have a different opinion of the current trade imbalance. On a per capita basis Japan purchases only slightly less U.S. goods than Americans do of Japanese goods.
OPINION
July 9, 1995
Re "U.S., Japan Reach Trade Pact on Cars," June 29: The accord was a thinly veiled "political" victory for both countries. It does not do much for the United States but satisfies some of the union people and sounds good. The battle to open Japan (which has a relatively closed market) was fought publicly on the wrong product since U.S. auto manufacturers have not marketed the right size, not changed steering column placement, etc., while European suppliers have done their homework.
OPINION
April 28, 1985
Regarding the controversy about the U.S.-Japan trade imbalance, I would like to add some of my thoughts. The foreign trade issue is not, as many people have apparently been led to believe, a totally "alien" cause. Many of the problems surrounding the low level of U.S. exports are purely the fault of what I shall term "American arrogance." For the U.S. auto makers to sell their wares in, for example, Japan, they have to target their product for that market by making the cars right-hand drive and printing the owner's manual in Japanese.
NEWS
July 5, 1988 | United Press International
Japan and the United States signed a landmark trade agreement today that calls on Japan to open its markets to imports of beef and citrus, nearly doubling projected annual sales for U.S. farmers. The signing ceremony at the Agriculture Department by Japanese Ambassador Nobuo Matsunaga and U.S. Trade Representative Clayton Yeutter signaled the end of a 10-year-old dispute between the nations.
NEWS
May 2, 1987 | SAM JAMESON and JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writers
President Reagan expressed optimism Friday that the "politically unsustainable" U.S. trade deficit with Japan will soon improve but warned that Japan must open its markets to American agricultural products. At a White House ceremony, Reagan assured Prime Minister Yasuhiro Nakasone that "we will remain each other's close friends and trading partners. Of that, there is no doubt."
BUSINESS
November 8, 1989 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two days of high-level negotiations between the United States and Japan ended on a sour note Tuesday, with angry U.S. officials complaining that Tokyo was stonewalling U.S. demands that Japan overhaul domestic business practices that hamper U.S. sales efforts.
BUSINESS
March 2, 1994 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton, following through on his threat to retaliate against Japan's trade policies, has decided to redeploy an old weapon that would allow the Administration to raise tariffs on Japanese goods sold in the United States, Administration and congressional sources said Tuesday.
NEWS
June 29, 1995 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States and Japan, capping a marathon negotiation that began nearly two years ago, agreed on a complex set of measures Wednesday that U.S. officials trumpeted as a momentous opening of Japan's automotive markets. Confronted with a deadline today for the imposition of a record $5.9 billion in U.S. trade penalties, Japan agreed to a series of steps by the government and its auto industry intended to make it far easier for U.S. competitors to offer their products to Japanese consumers.
BUSINESS
March 2, 1994 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton, following through on his threat to retaliate against Japan's trade policies, has decided to redeploy an old weapon that would allow the Administration to raise tariffs on Japanese goods sold in the United States, Administration and congressional sources said Tuesday.
BUSINESS
March 2, 1994 | PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Auto designer Gerald P. Hirshberg has been on both sides of the U.S.-Japan trade dispute. And, as a former designer for General Motors Corp. and now the San Diego-based chief designer for Japanese auto maker Nissan, he still is. "Anyone who's being honest who's working for a foreign company . . . (admits) you're torn between your allegiances to your country . . . and . . . putting food on the table," he said. So how is he viewing the rising trade tensions between the two economic superpowers?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 1992
Edward N. Luttwak's Opinion piece (Dec. 29) is a dismaying reflection of the ignorance of even the most impressively credentialed "experts" on trade with Japan. His characterization of a monolithic Japan Inc. is a common theme of the paranoid writers and politicians who want to create an easy target for the current problems of the U.S. economy. If he looked at a few facts he might have a different opinion of the current trade imbalance. On a per capita basis Japan purchases only slightly less U.S. goods than Americans do of Japanese goods.
BUSINESS
June 28, 1990 | From Associated Press
Japanese and U.S. negotiators today reached an agreement to help trim the $49-billion U.S. trade deficit with Japan. They hailed the accord as an unprecedented step toward easing tensions between the two partners. President Bush and Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu both issued statements saying the pact will enhance their countries' global partnership and also benefit other countries.
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