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BUSINESS
May 16, 1997 | SALLIE HOFMEISTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Viacom Inc. and Universal Studios Inc. were ordered Thursday to discontinue their 50-50 partnership in USA Networks by a Chancery Court in Delaware, a ruling that could eventually allow both companies to expand their cable businesses. Although the judge's ruling was a victory for Universal, which brought the lawsuit in April 1996, the ultimate outcome to stem from the nasty, yearlong court dispute remains unclear.
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BUSINESS
February 12, 1999 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The proposed $21-billion combination of Internet company Lycos with key assets of USA Networks was thrown into doubt Thursday when Lycos' largest shareholder expressed misgivings about the terms of the deal. CMGI Inc., an Andover, Mass.
BUSINESS
May 11, 1999 | SALLIE HOFMEISTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
USA Networks Inc., facing resistance from shareholders of Lycos Inc., is preparing to abandon its plan to purchase the nation's third-ranked Internet search service, executives close to the company confirmed Monday. The proposed $21.5-billion merger has been closely watched since it was announced in February because it is one of the first to challenge the highflying values of the Internet sector.
BUSINESS
August 13, 1998 | SALLIE HOFMEISTER and KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a bid to vastly expand its Internet business and tap into the craze on Wall Street for Internet stocks, Barry Diller's USA Networks Inc. is expected to announce plans today to merge the online ticketing arm of its Ticketmaster Group with CitySearch, a Pasadena-based company that creates online city guides.
BUSINESS
November 22, 2000 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
USA Networks said Tuesday that it will combine its Ticketmaster Corp. unit with its Internet cousin Ticketmaster Online-CitySearch in a deal that underscores the increasing overlap between online businesses and their real-world counterparts. Ticketmaster and Ticketmaster Online were split in August 1998, when investors were clamoring for "dot-com" stocks and companies were anxiously spinning off their Internet operations to cash in on the frenzy.
BUSINESS
March 21, 1999 | SALLIE HOFMEISTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Walt Disney Co.'s Michael Eisner doesn't have one. Neither does Sumner Redstone, the chairman and chief executive of Viacom Inc. But Barry Diller does. And in naming a forceful executive with visionary tendencies as his No. 2 at USA Networks Inc., Diller is winning applause from management experts for taking an initiative that many other media moguls have not--leaving their entertainment companies vulnerable at the top.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 2011 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
USA Network has come a long way, slowly, from the days when its main contribution to the culture was "Night Flight," an omnibus of music videos, reruns and camp ephemera that kept insomniac kids company back in the 1990s. Now it is the network that "Monk" made, with a small but strong-for-its-size roster of comicdramas that play nice turns on the old big genres — cops and spies and lawyers and doctors: "In Plain Sight," "Burn Notice," "White Collar," "Psych," "Fairly Legal," "Royal Pains.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2009 | MARY McNAMARA, TELEVISION CRITIC
Just when you thought bromance was dead, here comes "White Collar," a crime drama premiering on USA tonight that lifts the genre to a new and dazzling level. Sparkling, snappy, bursting with energy and good clean heist fun, the first episode of "White Collar" may, in fact, be the most perfect pilot to air in a long, long time. Sure, there are shameless echoes of "It Takes a Thief," the show that launched Robert Wagner's television career, but who cares? Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, and "White Collar's" creator, Jeff Easton, promises only improvement, and with a pitch-perfect cast that comes together to create that cinematic Holy Grail: chemistry.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 1993 | N.F. MENDOZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Both scenes are set in a steamy locker room. In one version, a woman drops her dress and exposes her naked body as she and her equally naked lover writhe on a bench. In the other version, the camera angle changes after she reaches for her dress; all that can be seen of the lovers is a grainy close-up of their faces. Same show, different TV channels.
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