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ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 1988 | JAY SHARBUTT, Times Staff Writer
The critically panned "USA Today: The Television Show," which billed itself as TV of the future, is being made "a little more traditional," its executive producer said Wednesday. But Steve Friedman said the alterations do not constitute "a change of format. . . . We're moving things around, working hard to get the stuff that works in the show and eliminate the stuff that didn't work." The changes won't be sudden, he added in a phone interview from the show's offices in Rosslyn, Va.
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NATIONAL
May 6, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
A reporter for USA Today resigned after an internal investigation found that he had used without attribution quotations that had appeared last year in another newspaper, USA Today said. Tom Squitieri, who worked for USA Today for 16 years, resigned during a meeting with editors who had examined his March 28 article on armored Humvees and compared it with an account from May 7, 2004, in the Indianapolis Star, USA Today editor Kenneth Paulson said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 1988 | JAY SHARBUTT, Times Staff Writer
Steve Friedman was in New Orleans last week, kibitzing with pals from his network days as they covered the GOP convention. John Hart was in Boston, practicing a program. But each was thinking of Sept. 12. On that day, each will be involved with new half-hour weeknight TV programs, with Hart anchoring the Christian Science Monitor's "World Monitor" and Friedman producing "USA Today: The Television Show."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2004 | TIM RUTTEN
For anybody who believes that American journalism counts for something that can't be entirely compressed onto a corporate ledger's bottom line, this has been a heartbreaking and sobering year. Both the country's most influential newspaper, the New York Times, and its largest, USA Today, have been rocked to their very foundations by the worst sort of scandal a news organization can endure: reporters who betrayed their readers' trust with fabrications, plagiarism and lies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1986
A 23-year-old USA Today newspaper carrier was struck on the head and critically injured as she stepped out of her delivery truck outside an El Toro delicatessen early Thursday. In what authorities say was a brutal and puzzling attack, the Santa Ana woman suffered a fractured skull, broken jaw and severely damaged eye in the 1:45 a.m. assault. Sheriff's Lt. Dick Olson said her assailant's weapon was not known. Investigators have not been able to determine a motive in the attack.
BUSINESS
May 11, 1989 | JAY SHARBUTT
Steve Friedman, the brash "Today" show producer whom Grant Tinker lured from NBC in 1987 to create the TV version of the USA Today newspaper, said Wednesday he's quitting Tinker's company on May 29. While the announcement was a surprise--Friedman's contract runs through September, 1990--both he and Tinker, the former chairman of NBC, emphasized in interviews that the parting is amicable. They said it was prompted by the desire of Friedman, 42, to produce shows, but not to have to sell them to sponsors and networks.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 1988 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
You might call them antithetical newspapers of the air, for "World Monitor" and "USA Today: The Television Show" are as different from each other as the publications that launched them. Both weekday half hours premiered Monday, occupying opposite ends of the news pole. Whereas "World Monitor" projects the same refreshingly thoughtful tone at 4 p.m.
SPORTS
December 31, 1993 | MIKE DOWNEY
In preseason polls for years, sportswriters have overrated Florida State, Florida and Miami in the top 10. They love to spend October and November weekends in the sunshine covering one of their highly rated teams. Morgantown, W.Va.; Lincoln, Neb., and South Bend, Ind., don't have the same appeal. Yes, some sportswriters really are that silly. --Written opinion of AL NEUHARTH, founder of USA Today, Dec. 30, 1993.
BUSINESS
May 16, 2001 | Dave Wilson
Two major newspapers are making staff reductions, the latest to hit the industry as a sudden decline in advertising revenues and higher newsprint prices squeeze profits. The San Jose Mercury News plans to cut 120 positions--about 8% of its work force--through buyouts and early retirement. About 25 posts probably will come from the newsroom, which employs more than 400 reporters, editors and clerks. The company laid off more than a dozen non-newsroom employees last month.
SPORTS
August 28, 1997
ASSOCIATED PRESS Through Aug. 24 *--* Team Record Points Prv. 1. Penn State (22) 0-0 1,602 1 2. Florida (14) 0-0 1,563 2 3. Florida State (6) 0-0 1,503 3 4. Washington (9) 0-0 1,498 4 5. Tennessee (7) 0-0 1,480 5 6. Nebraska (4) 0-0 1,425 6 7. North Carolina (4) 0-0 1,343 7 8. Colorado (3) 0-0 1,318 8 9. Ohio State (1) 0-0 1,166 9 10. LSU 0-0 1,092 10 11. Notre Dame 0-0 1,037 11 12. Texas 0-0 978 12 13. Syracuse 1-0 869 17 14. Miami 0-0 800 13 15. Michigan 0-0 792 14 16. Alabama 0-0 664 15 17.
SPORTS
December 22, 1994 | VINCE KOWALICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chris Sailer of Notre Dame High, who kicked a state-record 22 field goals this season and tied the career mark of 33, was named Wednesday to the All-USA football team selected by USA Today. Sailer, one of the most-recruited kickers in the nation, this season connected on seven field goals of at least 50 yards, including a career-best 58-yarder against St. Francis. Sailer's leg played an integral role in Notre Dame's drive to the Southern Section Division III championship.
SPORTS
December 31, 1993 | MIKE DOWNEY
In preseason polls for years, sportswriters have overrated Florida State, Florida and Miami in the top 10. They love to spend October and November weekends in the sunshine covering one of their highly rated teams. Morgantown, W.Va.; Lincoln, Neb., and South Bend, Ind., don't have the same appeal. Yes, some sportswriters really are that silly. --Written opinion of AL NEUHARTH, founder of USA Today, Dec. 30, 1993.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 1993 | HOWARD KURTZ, THE WASHINGTON POST
USA Today has suspended reporter Richard Price for one month and fined him thousands of dollars for his role in arranging a misleading photograph of Los Angeles gang members, sources said Friday. Peter Prichard, the paper's editor, said Price had been "significantly disciplined. We took significant action. I think it was an unethical lapse on his part." Prichard declined to provide details, and the exact amount of the fine could not be ascertained.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 1993
Rep. Maxine Waters (D-Los Angeles) on Thursday criticized the use of a Page 1 photograph in Tuesday's edition of USA Today for "undermining our efforts to keep the peace" in South-Central Los Angeles. The photograph of several armed gang members accompanied a story about building tensions in South-Central because of the federal civil rights trial of four police officers involved in the beating of Rodney G. King.
BUSINESS
October 7, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Shopping Carts to Carry USA Today Electronic News: Videocart Inc., an IBM-backed company that mounts wireless personal computers onto shopping carts, will begin carrying electronic news provided by USA Today. Videocart said it reached an agreement with the newspaper to offer shoppers a choice of news summaries of the day's top stories from USA Today's four sections--News, Money, Sports and Life--directly on their carts when in the checkout area.
SPORTS
April 13, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Arthur Ashe, who announced Wednesday that he has AIDS, writes in Sunday's Washington Post that "going public with a disease such as AIDS is akin to telling the world in 1900 that you have leprosy." Ashe, 48, said he decided to announce his condition after a sportswriter for USA Today asked him to confirm his condition. "I understand that the press has a watchdog role in the maintenance of our freedom and to expose corruption," Ashe wrote.
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