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OPINION
November 3, 2013
Re "Afghan projects may lose oversight," Oct. 30 The article overlooks Afghanistan's development progress as it breezes over USAID's rigorous oversight of our projects worldwide. In the last 10 years, Afghans have seen a 20-year increase in life expectancy and a 62% decrease in child mortality. A decade ago, female education was banned in Afghanistan. Now, almost 3 million girls attend school. Americans can be proud of their contribution to those achievements. Furthermore, allegations of widespread waste and mismanagement are unfounded.
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NATIONAL
April 8, 2014 | By Lalita Clozel
WASHINGTON - Lawmakers interrogated the head of the U.S. Agency for International Development on Tuesday over the organization's funding of a Twitter-like program in Cuba reportedly designed to stir political unrest in the island nation. Sen. Patrick J. Leahy (D-Vt.), chairman of the Senate appropriations subcommittee on state, foreign operations and related programs, told USAID Administrator Rajiv Shah that the secretive government-funded program was a “cockamamie idea” that “from the get-go had no possibility of working.” Shah denied elements of a report by the Associated Press, which last week revealed the U.S. role in a social media messaging service for Cubans.
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WORLD
September 20, 2012 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
MOSCOW - Russia's Foreign Ministry on Wednesday said that the U.S. Agency for International Development was being barred from operating in the country beginning Oct. 1 because it had meddled in elections. The statement followed a State Department announcement the day before that USAID had been ordered out after operating in Russia for two decades. The U.S. agency had strayed from "the declared goals of assisting the development of bilateral humanitarian cooperation," Alexander Lukashevich, a spokesman for the Foreign Ministry, said in a statement posted on the ministry's website.
WORLD
December 23, 2013 | By David Zucchino
KABUL, Afghanistan - The reports are cranked out with relentless efficiency: blistering tales of waste, fraud and abuse of American taxpayer-funded projects to rebuild Afghanistan. The damning audits from the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction strike like missiles at the U.S. Embassy and military headquarters here. Trumpeted by an aggressive public relations effort, SIGAR findings cause heartburn among American diplomats and generals alike. Saying they are sometimes unfairly targeted, those in the cross hairs are now seeking to more effectively highlight their efforts to rectify shortcomings.
WORLD
May 6, 2013 | By Paul Richter, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - When Bolivian President Evo Morales expelled the U.S. Agency for International Development from his impoverished country last week, he complained that Washington "still has a mentality of domination and submission" in the region. It was a familiar charge for the State Department's principal foreign aid agency. In the last two years, it has been booted out of Russia, snubbed in Egypt and declared unwelcome by a bloc of left-leaning Latin American countries. USAID "threatens our sovereignty and stability," the eight-nation Bolivarian Alliance of the Americas fumed in June in a resolution that accused the United States of political interference, conspiracy and "looting our natural resources.
OPINION
November 26, 2005
Your Nov. 13 editorial, "A historic opportunity," raises the specter of malaria's devastation but unfairly details efforts of the U.S. Agency for International Development. USAID has an operational presence in 100 countries and arguably has more reach than almost any international health organization in the world. Between 1998 and 2005, USAID increased its annual commitment to fighting malaria from $22 million to $89 million, most of which was targeted to African countries with the highest levels of transmission.
WORLD
December 8, 2010 | By Ken Dilanian, Los Angeles Times
The U.S. government Wednesday took the unusual step of banning an American firm from being awarded new federal contracts due to evidence of "serious corporate misconduct" uncovered in an investigation of the company's work on aid programs in Pakistan and Afghanistan. The move by the U.S. Agency for International Development, or USAID, to suspend the Academy for Educational Development, or AED, a Washington-based nonprofit corporation that does extensive federal contracting, highlights longstanding concerns about the way the United States delivers foreign aid through a network of American contractors that some critics deride as "Beltway Bandits.
NEWS
September 13, 1992 | Reuters
The United States has granted Tunisia $10 million to support the government's privatization program, the U.S. Embassy said Friday. An agreement on the grant was signed in Tunis Friday by Secretary of State for Foreign Affaires Noureddine Mejdoub, U.S. Ambassador John McCarthy and the USAID reprensentative in Tunis. Last month the United States granted Tunisia $18.5 million to train managers in the private sector.
WORLD
August 4, 2013 | By Shashank Bengali
WASHINGTON - As the U.S. military presence dwindles in Afghanistan, officials are finalizing a $200-million plan to use smartphones, GPS-enabled cameras and satellite imagery to monitor relief projects that will continue in areas deemed too remote or unsafe for Americans to visit. The proposal underscores the rapidly diminishing American footprint in Afghanistan after nearly 12 years of war, and signals that more of the massive U.S. reconstruction effort there - long plagued by waste and weak oversight - will be monitored by Afghans, with U.S. officials forced to supervise from a distance.
WORLD
May 1, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
This post has been updated. Please see the notes below for details. Bolivian President Evo Morales declared Wednesday he was expelling the U.S. Agency for International Development from the country, accusing the aid agency of conspiring against his government. “Surely to think that you can still manipulate us economically, politically -- those times are past,” Morales said at May Day celebrations in La Paz, according to the Bolivian national news agency . The Bolivian leader asserted that USAID had sown divisions and destabilized the country and his government.
WORLD
November 10, 2013 | By Brian Bennett
WASHINGTON - American military search-and-rescue helicopters, surveillance planes and Marines streamed toward the central Philippines on Sunday to survey the devastation and assist survivors whose homes were washed away by one of the largest Pacific storms on record. Typhoon Haiyan - called Typhoon Yolanda by Filipinos - may have killed more than 10,000 people, officials said Sunday, as it lashed the island chain with winds over 200 miles per hour and caused widespread flooding. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel directed the U.S. Pacific Command to deploy rescue teams, helicopters for airlifts, logistics officers and cargo planes to assist in the relief efforts.
OPINION
November 3, 2013
Re "Afghan projects may lose oversight," Oct. 30 The article overlooks Afghanistan's development progress as it breezes over USAID's rigorous oversight of our projects worldwide. In the last 10 years, Afghans have seen a 20-year increase in life expectancy and a 62% decrease in child mortality. A decade ago, female education was banned in Afghanistan. Now, almost 3 million girls attend school. Americans can be proud of their contribution to those achievements. Furthermore, allegations of widespread waste and mismanagement are unfounded.
WORLD
September 5, 2013 | By Shashank Bengali
WASHINGTON - An independent audit released Thursday accused the U.S. Agency for International Development of “reckless disregard toward the management of U.S. taxpayer dollars,” prompting an angry rebuttal from the agency leading American reconstruction efforts in Afghanistan. The special inspector general for Afghanistan reconstruction said the agency funded a $236-million health program without verifying the Afghan government's cost estimate and provided the money directly to the Afghan Health Ministry despite its weak financial management capabilities.
WORLD
August 4, 2013 | By Shashank Bengali
WASHINGTON - As the U.S. military presence dwindles in Afghanistan, officials are finalizing a $200-million plan to use smartphones, GPS-enabled cameras and satellite imagery to monitor relief projects that will continue in areas deemed too remote or unsafe for Americans to visit. The proposal underscores the rapidly diminishing American footprint in Afghanistan after nearly 12 years of war, and signals that more of the massive U.S. reconstruction effort there - long plagued by waste and weak oversight - will be monitored by Afghans, with U.S. officials forced to supervise from a distance.
WORLD
May 6, 2013 | By Paul Richter, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - When Bolivian President Evo Morales expelled the U.S. Agency for International Development from his impoverished country last week, he complained that Washington "still has a mentality of domination and submission" in the region. It was a familiar charge for the State Department's principal foreign aid agency. In the last two years, it has been booted out of Russia, snubbed in Egypt and declared unwelcome by a bloc of left-leaning Latin American countries. USAID "threatens our sovereignty and stability," the eight-nation Bolivarian Alliance of the Americas fumed in June in a resolution that accused the United States of political interference, conspiracy and "looting our natural resources.
WORLD
May 1, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
This post has been updated. Please see the notes below for details. Bolivian President Evo Morales declared Wednesday he was expelling the U.S. Agency for International Development from the country, accusing the aid agency of conspiring against his government. “Surely to think that you can still manipulate us economically, politically -- those times are past,” Morales said at May Day celebrations in La Paz, according to the Bolivian national news agency . The Bolivian leader asserted that USAID had sown divisions and destabilized the country and his government.
OPINION
November 17, 2009
Re "Fixing foreign aid," Editorial, Nov. 12 Your editorial calling for a major overhaul of our foreign assistance system rightly points out that foreign aid is an important means of self-defense and that American foreign aid efforts are a muddle. However, while you mentioned the bipartisan legislation I introduced this spring to initiate foreign aid reform, you neglected to note that this bill was only the first step in a far more comprehensive effort that the House Foreign Affairs Committee has undertaken over the last year.
WORLD
December 23, 2013 | By David Zucchino
KABUL, Afghanistan - The reports are cranked out with relentless efficiency: blistering tales of waste, fraud and abuse of American taxpayer-funded projects to rebuild Afghanistan. The damning audits from the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction strike like missiles at the U.S. Embassy and military headquarters here. Trumpeted by an aggressive public relations effort, SIGAR findings cause heartburn among American diplomats and generals alike. Saying they are sometimes unfairly targeted, those in the cross hairs are now seeking to more effectively highlight their efforts to rectify shortcomings.
WORLD
September 20, 2012 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
MOSCOW - Russia's Foreign Ministry on Wednesday said that the U.S. Agency for International Development was being barred from operating in the country beginning Oct. 1 because it had meddled in elections. The statement followed a State Department announcement the day before that USAID had been ordered out after operating in Russia for two decades. The U.S. agency had strayed from "the declared goals of assisting the development of bilateral humanitarian cooperation," Alexander Lukashevich, a spokesman for the Foreign Ministry, said in a statement posted on the ministry's website.
OPINION
February 16, 2011 | By Micah Zenko and Rebecca R. Friedman
On Valentine's Day, Congress received a gift from President Obama: the federal budget for fiscal year 2012. As its opening shot in what promises to be a long and hard budgetary battle, the White House requested $47 billion for the Department of State and the U.S. Agency for International Development. Although this is a 1% increase overall ? with extra money primarily dedicated for preventing and treating HIV/AIDS and malaria ? it makes cuts in most other major programs. Although belt-tightening is undoubtedly necessary, too many Americans ?
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