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SPORTS
February 4, 1991 | STEVE SPRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Vancouver Canucks, arriving in Los Angeles aboard a commercial Canadian airliner Friday night to play the Kings, wound up as spectators to a disaster. The Canucks landed at Los Angeles International Airport just ahead of the USAir 737-300 that collided with a commuter plane after touching down, killing 33 people. The Canadian Pacific plane carrying the Canucks had just taxied off the adjacent runway when the collision occurred, affording the Canucks a full view of the tragedy.
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NEWS
February 8, 1991 | ERIC MALNIC and TRACY WOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
An air traffic controller told federal investigators that last week's Los Angeles airport disaster occurred after she mistook a commuter plane on a taxiway for a similar SkyWest plane that was sitting on a runway, officials reported Thursday. The unidentified controller also told investigators in a three-hour interview Wednesday that she cleared a USAir Boeing 737 for landing on the same runway because she did not see the SkyWest plane.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1991 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Airport runway mishaps are "one of the most significant hazards to aviation today," and the potential for collisions--such as the one this month at Los Angeles International Airport--is likely to increase as airports become more congested, a top official with the National Transportation Safety Board said Monday. NTSB official Matthew McCormick made his remarks during an all-day congressional hearing on the Feb.
NEWS
February 9, 1991 | MARK STEIN, This article was reported by Times staff writers Rich Connell, Eric Malnic, John Mitchell, Mark Stein and Tracy Wood. It was written by Stein.
Trembling in shock and smoking a cigarette, Robin Lee Wascher sat in a Los Angeles International Airport control tower office after guiding two airliners onto the same runway and seeing the ball of flame from the collision. "I'm sorry. I'm sorry," the 38-year-old ground controller murmured over and over, tears spilling fitfully from her brown eyes. Outside, firefighters were pumping flame-smothering foam into the smoldering wreck of a USAir Boeing 737 and pulling out victims. The Feb.
NEWS
February 3, 1991 | JENIFER WARREN and JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
They were a varied bunch. A businessman, a high school senior, even an air traffic controller returning home from a business trip to Atlantic City, N.J. On Friday evening, just before 6, they came together at Los Angeles International Airport, clambering up a steep stairway into a slender Metroliner with two engines and 19 seats. The flight was SkyWest 5569, bound for Palmdale, 60 miles away.
NEWS
December 12, 1987 | ERIC MALNIC, Times Staff Writer
FBI handwriting experts confirmed Friday that the note of doom penned on an airsickness bag found amid the wreckage of Pacific Southwest Airlines Flight 1771 was written by David A. Burke, who investigators have concluded caused the crash. The crash near Paso Robles on Monday, which claimed the lives of all 43 aboard the Los Angeles-to-San Francisco shuttle, may rank as the second worst mass murder in U.S. history.
NEWS
February 3, 1991 | JEFFREY L. RABIN and HELAINE OLEN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The cockpit crews of the USAir and SkyWest planes--three of whom perished in Friday's fiery collision at Los Angeles International Airport--were veteran pilots who had logged thousands of hours in the air. In Huntingtown, Md., neighbors described the USAir pilot, Capt. Colin F. Shaw, 48, as a mechanic at heart who tinkered for hours on old cars and planes. For Shaw, who was killed in the crash, "half the fun was finding old cars," said neighbor Tom Tearman.
NEWS
February 3, 1991 | PAUL FELDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Colleen Scudmore, 39, peered out the window of the 19-seat commuter aircraft and picked nervously at her fingers. It was 5:58 p.m. Saturday and SkyWest Flight 5569 was taxiing down Runway 25-Right of Los Angeles International Airport, less than 24 hours after Friday's Flight 5569 had been crushed under an incoming USAir Boeing 737, killing all 12 aboard.
NEWS
September 21, 1989 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN and SCOT J. PALTROW, Times Staff Writers
A USAir Boeing 737 jetliner crashed on takeoff Wednesday night at La Guardia Airport, broke into three pieces at the end of a runway and came to rest like a beached whale with its tail in the East River. At least three people were killed and 49 injured, three critically, police said. Scores of passengers and crew from the 737-400, Flight 5050 bound for Charlotte, N.C., were rescued in fog and rain.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 1991 | CAROL McGRAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what has become a rite of aviation disasters, survivors of the USAir crash at Los Angeles International Airport say they have been besieged by lawyers urging them to sue for millions of dollars in damages. Robert MacDonald, a 22-year-old mechanical engineer from Whittier, said he has been contacted by attorneys from across the country, purporting to be experts on airline crashes. He did not keep their phone numbers or names.
BUSINESS
February 12, 1991 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
USAir, hit by huge losses last year, said Monday that it will lay off 3,585 employees in the next few months, closing flight crew bases in San Diego and three other cities and eliminating an aircraft maintenance facility in Los Angeles. The company declined comment on where the jobs would be cut. But sources familiar with the company's operations said that as many as 350 USAir employees would lose their jobs at Orange County John Wayne Airport on May 2 when USAir pulls out of that market.
BUSINESS
February 12, 1991 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
USAir will respond to huge losses by laying off 3,585 employees, or 7%, of its payroll in coming months, closing flight-crew bases in San Diego and three other cities and eliminating an aircraft maintenance facility in Los Angeles. The airline won't know how many of its 6,000 California employees will lose jobs for several months, spokesman Larry Pickett said Monday.
NEWS
February 9, 1991 | MARK STEIN, This article was reported by Times staff writers Rich Connell, Eric Malnic, John Mitchell, Mark Stein and Tracy Wood. It was written by Stein.
Trembling in shock and smoking a cigarette, Robin Lee Wascher sat in a Los Angeles International Airport control tower office after guiding two airliners onto the same runway and seeing the ball of flame from the collision. "I'm sorry. I'm sorry," the 38-year-old ground controller murmured over and over, tears spilling fitfully from her brown eyes. Outside, firefighters were pumping flame-smothering foam into the smoldering wreck of a USAir Boeing 737 and pulling out victims. The Feb.
NEWS
February 8, 1991 | ERIC MALNIC and TRACY WOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
An air traffic controller told federal investigators that last week's Los Angeles airport disaster occurred after she mistook a commuter plane on a taxiway for a similar SkyWest plane that was sitting on a runway, officials reported Thursday. The unidentified controller also told investigators in a three-hour interview Wednesday that she cleared a USAir Boeing 737 for landing on the same runway because she did not see the SkyWest plane.
NEWS
September 23, 1989 | ERIC MALNIC, Times Staff Writer
Amid reports of aberrant and inept behavior by the cockpit crew, federal officials on Friday suspended the licenses of the captain and co-pilot of a USAir jetliner that crashed during an aborted takeoff attempt at La Guardia Airport on Wednesday night. The Federal Aviation Administration said that because of "circumstances related to the accident . . . (Capt. Michael Martin and First Officer Constantine Kleissas) no longer qualify to exercise their privileges to fly an airliner."
NEWS
December 10, 1987 | PHILLIP DIXON and FREDERICK M. MUIR, Times Staff Writers
David A. Burke was an ambitious and generous young man whose cool demeanor could mask a terrible temper. Many here and in Southern California knew him as a hard-working achiever who, for a college dropout, had acquired surprising trappings of success: fine clothes, a Mercedes-Benz and the attentions of many women. But as David Augustus Burke's short life was winding down, it became increasingly troubled and explosive.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 1991 | This article was prepared by Times staff writers Glenn F. Bunting, Eric Malnic, John L. Mitchell, Mark A. Stein and Tracy Wood
A trouble-shooter who could have warned a confused controller that she was directing two aircraft into a fatal crash last week was not in place at Los Angeles International Airport because controllers there, unlike those at other major airports, consider the backups bothersome, government investigators said Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 1991 | GLENN F. BUNTING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As federal investigators tried to determine how 18 people were unable to escape from a burning USAir jet at Los Angeles International Airport, questions arose Tuesday over why the airliner was not retrofitted with the latest in fire-retardant materials. Meanwhile, a National Transportation Safety Board official criticized the Federal Aviation Administration for what he called shortcomings in tests used to determine if passengers trapped in burning aircraft can escape quickly.
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