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March 23, 1992 | ERIC MALNIC and JOHN GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A USAir commuter jet attempting to take off from La Guardia Airport in a heavy snowstorm cartwheeled down the runway, burst into flames and tumbled into Flushing Bay on Sunday night. Police said at least 20 people were killed and dozens more were injured, many of them seriously.
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NEWS
March 8, 1997 | From Associated Press
A federal jury Friday ruled USAir was negligent in a 1994 crash that killed 37 people during a fierce thunderstorm near Charlotte, N.C. But it spared the airline from having to pay punitive damages. Because the jury found that USAir's conduct was not "willful" or "wanton," the airline is liable only for compensatory damages. The first of as many as 18 individual trials to determine damages begins Wednesday.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 1991 | MARK A. STEIN., This story was reported by Times staff writers Glenn F. Bunting, Rich Connell, Eric Malnic and Tracy Wood. It was written by Mark A. Stein
For air traffic controller Robin Lee Wascher, the Feb. 1 disaster on Los Angeles International Airport Runway 24-Left--her runway--was "especially tragic" because her parents had died in an aviation accident nearly 14 years ago, friends and co-workers said. Norman K. and Beverly Jean Wascher vanished June 19, 1977, while flying to Oxnard in their single-engine plane after attending another daughter's college graduation in Eureka, Calif. The plane has never been found.
BUSINESS
October 15, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
USAir Says It's in Talks to Buy Jetliners: Boeing Co., Europe's Airbus Industrie and McDonnell Douglas Corp. are all vying to replace older aircraft for USAir Group, the nation's sixth-largest carrier, which is seeking to reduce costs. The Arlington, Va.-based airline is in the market for as many as 120 new jets valued at about $5 billion, sources told Bloomberg Business News. USAir declined to confirm or deny the number of aircraft involved.
NEWS
September 9, 1994 | JUDY PASTERNAK and MICHAEL ROSS and BILL STEIGERWALD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A USAir jetliner roared out of a clear evening sky and hurtled nose first into a wooded hill late Thursday about a half-mile from a small shopping center near this Pennsylvania steel town, killing all 131 people on board. It was the deadliest airplane crash in the United States in seven years. The plane, a Boeing 737 en route from Chicago to Pittsburgh, had been scheduled to continue on to West Palm Beach, Fla. It shattered on impact.
NEWS
May 8, 1991 | ERIC MALNIC and RICH CONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In dramatic testimony Tuesday, an air traffic controller accepted blame for February's fatal runway collision in Los Angeles and the co-pilot of one plane told how his pilot died in the flaming wreckage. It was the first public appearance by 38-year-old controller Robin Lee Wascher since the accident and the first time she acknowledged publicly that her mistake led to the crash.
BUSINESS
June 7, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
U.S. Rejects Sale of 2 USAir London Routes: USAir Inc.'s request to sell two of its rights to fly to London was dismissed by the U.S. Department of Transportation, opening the possibility that the rights will simply be transferred to another airline. American Airlines has already asked the DOT to give it the rights for free, contending they are owned by the U.S. government. USAir has to give up its three London routes as a condition of its alliance with British Airways.
BUSINESS
June 17, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
USAir Sees Loss for 2nd Quarter and Year: USAir Group Inc., which had hoped for a profit in the latest quarter, said it will lose money for the quarter and for the year because of continued weakness in the nations's economy. Shares in the Arlington, Va.-based carrier plunged $1.75 to close at $17.125 in active trading on the New York Stock Exchange. The airline had based its projections on actual results for April and May and on its expectations for June.
NEWS
October 14, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A USAir flight from Philadelphia to Los Angeles was diverted to Dayton, Ohio, after a passenger said he had a bomb, the FBI said. Agents arrested Richard Allan Josephson, 37, of Wilmington, Del., and charged him with making a bomb threat, said FBI agent James Samples. If convicted, he faces up to 20 years in prison. WHIO-TV in Dayton quoted an FBI affidavit as saying that Josephson mentioned a bomb when he handed a bag to a flight attendant.
BUSINESS
July 31, 1996 | PETER BEHR and ANTHONY FAIOLA, WASHINGTON POST
USAir Inc. filed suit Tuesday to break up its 3-year-old alliance with British Airways, claiming it had been betrayed by its partner's recent plans to join forces with American Airlines. The proposed linkage of American and British Airways--which would be the biggest in a series of recent global airline alliances--would cripple Arlington, Va.-based USAir by effectively barring it from the lucrative U.S.-London market, USAir contended in the suit filed in federal court in New York.
NEWS
June 29, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The cockpit crew of a USAir Shuttle 727 was grounded after taking off in a storm so severe that controllers fled the tower and National Airport shut for 40 minutes, an airline official said. The crew was grounded pending a federal investigation and an airline review, the official said. Flight 6500, carrying 111 passengers, was shaken by wind shear and one of its wings was damaged when it may have dipped so low that it hit a runway light, aviation officials said. No one was injured.
BUSINESS
January 17, 1996 | From the Washington Post
Stephen M. Wolf, a longtime airline executive who specializes in turning around troubled carriers, was hired Tuesday to do just that at USAir, the nation's fifth-largest airline. Wolf was named chairman and chief executive of Arlington, Va.-based USAir Inc., with the immediate task of trimming more than $1 billion in labor costs from the airline. He will take over Monday from Seth Schofield, who tried and failed to persuade the airline's unions to make contract concessions.
NEWS
April 5, 1995 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A USAir DC-9 crashed in North Carolina last July because of a deadly combination of crew mistakes, bad weather and incomplete information from air traffic controllers, federal safety authorities concluded Tuesday. Thirty-seven people died in the crash.
NEWS
March 26, 1995 | The Washington Post
USAir and its pilots' union broke an eight-month logjam Saturday and reached a tentative agreement on wage and benefit concessions that both sides said are essential to the airline's survival. Several weeks of negotiations lie ahead, including settlements with three other unions. But the talks with the pilots were by far the most difficult and most important in the airline's quest to cut its costs, which are the highest in the industry. USAir Group Inc., based in Arlington, Va., has lost $2.
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