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February 17, 2006 | From Reuters
A coalition of farmers, consumers and environmental activists Thursday sued the U.S. government over its approval of a biotech alfalfa that critics say will spell havoc for farmers and the environment. Opening another front in the battle over genetically modified crops, the lawsuit contends that the U.S. Department of Agriculture is improperly allowing Monsanto Co.
April 9, 1997
Dr. Samuel Epstein is off base on his views about the current trade dispute between the U.S. and the European Union over the use of animal growth promotants ("None of Us Should Eat Extra Estrogen," Commentary, March 24). For the record, the EU ban is an unfair trade barrier. The EU's original intent was to protect European beef producers due to large surpluses of beef produced in Europe. The joint United Nations committee that prepared the report determining the safety of growth promotants was described by Epstein as having "minimal expertise in public health" and "high representation of . . . senior FDA and USDA officials."
June 14, 1985
The Southern California area produces millions of pounds of beef every day and feeds millions of people throughout Southern California, the nation and the world. The meat industry in conjunction with USDA inspection procedures has provided the consumer with a wholesome and nutritious product in the past and will continue to do so in the future. The Times article cited a report put out by the USDA, which is based on inspections of meat houses in January and February of 1985. The public needs to be made aware of what the figures presented actually mean to them.
April 24, 1986
After a three-month absence from the U.S. market, the Soviet Union purchased 200,000 metric tons of corn--about 7.9 million bushels--for delivery through Sept. 30, the Agriculture Department said. Officials said the sales were reported to the USDA by private exporters as required by law. No prices or other details were disclosed.
September 13, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
California's navel-orange crop will be 34% smaller this season after higher-than-normal temperatures in May caused fruit to drop from trees prematurely, the U.S. Department of Agriculture said. Growers will pick 32 million boxes of the fruit (1.2 million tons), down from a revised estimate of 48.5 million boxes last season, the USDA said.
January 4, 1985 | Associated Press
The Agriculture Department said Thursday that two California poultry companies have been suspended from providing food to the government's school lunch program because of "alleged false representation" that their product met federal specifications. Officials identified the suspended firms as Cal-Pacific Poultry Inc. of Pomona and Beaumont Poultry Inc. of Beaumont. Both companies are under the same management.
December 10, 2004
The Dec. 6 editorial, "New Farmer in Chief," ignores key accomplishments at the Department of Agriculture under the leadership of Secretary Ann M. Veneman. Significant food safety enhancements have helped reduce the prevalence of E. coli and salmonella in raw meat and poultry. Veneman put in place new safeguards against bovine spongiform encephalopathy. New forest rules have resulted in the treatment of a record 4 million acres for undergrowth in 2004 and intensified the fight against invasive species, treating 1.1 million acres.
December 18, 2013 | By Saba Hamedy
The U.S. Department of Agriculture fined Harvard Medical School $24,036 on Wednesday for 11 Animal Welfare Act violations, including four animal deaths, from February 2011 through July 2012. The government's decision to fine the university wraps up an ongoing investigation of the medical school's animal facilities. One facility, the New England Primate Research Center , located in Southborough, Mass., announced its decision to close in April. In a document sent to the university's Center for Animal Resources and Comparative Medicine, USDA officials outlined the alleged violations.
March 4, 2008
The U.S. Department of Agriculture just issued the biggest beef recall in history. Not really. It was, in fact, the biggest recall, but not by the USDA, which has no power to recall tainted food. The agency has to prod and push meatpackers to do that. It also won't tell consumers in 49 states that they might have bought some of the 143 million pounds of suspect beef from a Chino slaughterhouse. Only Californians have access to such a list. (Go to the state Department of Public Health website, www.cdph.
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