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BUSINESS
September 13, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
California's navel-orange crop will be 34% smaller this season after higher-than-normal temperatures in May caused fruit to drop from trees prematurely, the U.S. Department of Agriculture said. Growers will pick 32 million boxes of the fruit (1.2 million tons), down from a revised estimate of 48.5 million boxes last season, the USDA said.
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BUSINESS
April 24, 1986
After a three-month absence from the U.S. market, the Soviet Union purchased 200,000 metric tons of corn--about 7.9 million bushels--for delivery through Sept. 30, the Agriculture Department said. Officials said the sales were reported to the USDA by private exporters as required by law. No prices or other details were disclosed.
BUSINESS
February 17, 2006 | From Reuters
A coalition of farmers, consumers and environmental activists Thursday sued the U.S. government over its approval of a biotech alfalfa that critics say will spell havoc for farmers and the environment. Opening another front in the battle over genetically modified crops, the lawsuit contends that the U.S. Department of Agriculture is improperly allowing Monsanto Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 1985 | Associated Press
The Agriculture Department said Thursday that two California poultry companies have been suspended from providing food to the government's school lunch program because of "alleged false representation" that their product met federal specifications. Officials identified the suspended firms as Cal-Pacific Poultry Inc. of Pomona and Beaumont Poultry Inc. of Beaumont. Both companies are under the same management.
OPINION
December 10, 2004
The Dec. 6 editorial, "New Farmer in Chief," ignores key accomplishments at the Department of Agriculture under the leadership of Secretary Ann M. Veneman. Significant food safety enhancements have helped reduce the prevalence of E. coli and salmonella in raw meat and poultry. Veneman put in place new safeguards against bovine spongiform encephalopathy. New forest rules have resulted in the treatment of a record 4 million acres for undergrowth in 2004 and intensified the fight against invasive species, treating 1.1 million acres.
BUSINESS
October 8, 2013 | By David Pierson and Tiffany Hsu
A salmonella outbreak in Foster Farms chicken contains several antibiotic-resistant strains that may explain an unusually high rate of hospitalization. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Tuesday that some salmonella strains found in the outbreak were resistant to one or more drugs -- and that 42% of those sickened have been hospitalized. "That's about double the hospitalization rate of a regular salmonella outbreak," said Caroline Smith DeWaal, food safety director for the Center for Science in the Public Interest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 2013 | By Darren McQuade, Fox40
A 25-pound feral cat was captured and neutered by a San Joaquin County animal rescue group after a neighbor mistook him for a mountain lion. Residents in the community of Mountain House call the big feline Man Face. “Man Face, yeah that's what we call him,” said neighbor Jimmy Sales. “He is a real mean cat. He beats up all the cats in the neighborhood.” Sales told FOX40 in Sacramento he would not mistake Man Face for a mountain lion but reiterated that the cat is really big. Neighbors are hoping Man Face will calm down after his neutering.
OPINION
March 4, 2008
The U.S. Department of Agriculture just issued the biggest beef recall in history. Not really. It was, in fact, the biggest recall, but not by the USDA, which has no power to recall tainted food. The agency has to prod and push meatpackers to do that. It also won't tell consumers in 49 states that they might have bought some of the 143 million pounds of suspect beef from a Chino slaughterhouse. Only Californians have access to such a list. (Go to the state Department of Public Health website, www.cdph.
NATIONAL
December 13, 2012 | By Andrew Khouri
The federal government is the ultimate master of the roughly 40 cats, many with six toes, that lounge around the Ernest Hemingway Home and Museum in Key West, Fla. A federal appeals court has ruled that the U.S. Department of Agriculture has the power to regulate the cats, agreeing with a district court that the museum is an animal exhibitor and can be regulated under the Animal Welfare Act. The cats, some of them kin of Ernest Hemingway's six-toed...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1985
This is in reference to John Kendall's article (May 28), "Southland Meat Industry, Inspections Under Probe." As a trade association representing many meat companies in Southern California, we are concerned that the article gives consumers the incorrect impression that bad meat is being shipped from Los Angeles-area meat plants to supermarkets, butcher shops, and restaurants. We are equally concerned about meat companies that do not adhere to the standards required by law. In the meat business, as has so often been the case, one bad actor spoils the whole show.
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