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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1990
The Los Angeles City Council on Tuesday exempted residential parking from the new city parking tax. In a unanimous vote, the council agreed that residents who pay to park at apartment houses or condominiums were not meant to be covered by the tax that took effect in July. It exacts a 10% levy on all commercial parking.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
November 6, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Uber, the San Francisco-based car service company, is using election day to get out the word on its mobile app. The mobile start-up is running a promotion today that offers free rides for first-time users to get to a polling location. The service can be used anywhere in the Los Angeles metropolitan area. Make plans for how you'll get back, though, as the offer can only be used for a one-way ride, not a round trip. If you want to ride back using Uber, it'll cost you a minimum of $15 in Los Angeles.
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NEWS
January 4, 2001 | LAWRENCE J. MAGID, larry.magid@latimes.com
One of the most annoying aspects of some PC programs is the way they try to take control. Some load automatically when you start your computer. Others become the default application for certain types of files. Some do both. There are those who call this type of automation a feature. I call it a nuisance. It's irksome on a number of levels. First, software that loads automatically slows down the computer's start-up because Windows has to load each program into memory.
BUSINESS
August 17, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Box, a cloud data storage provider, is offering users 25 gigabytes of free storage as part of a promotion with another tech company. The promotion lets new users get five times as much storage as the free 5 GB that Box normally offers. The offer is effective until the end of August. Users will get the additional storage after signing up for HelloSign's new digital document signature service. The offer also appeared earlier on Box's homepage, meaning some users could sign up with Box and get the 25 GB of storage without also signing up for HelloSign.
BUSINESS
November 6, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Uber, the San Francisco-based car service company, is using election day to get out the word on its mobile app. The mobile start-up is running a promotion today that offers free rides for first-time users to get to a polling location. The service can be used anywhere in the Los Angeles metropolitan area. Make plans for how you'll get back, though, as the offer can only be used for a one-way ride, not a round trip. If you want to ride back using Uber, it'll cost you a minimum of $15 in Los Angeles.
BUSINESS
August 17, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Box, a cloud data storage provider, is offering users 25 gigabytes of free storage as part of a promotion with another tech company. The promotion lets new users get five times as much storage as the free 5 GB that Box normally offers. The offer is effective until the end of August. Users will get the additional storage after signing up for HelloSign's new digital document signature service. The offer also appeared earlier on Box's homepage, meaning some users could sign up with Box and get the 25 GB of storage without also signing up for HelloSign.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1992 | JAMES BORNEMEIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rep. Duncan Hunter (R-Coronado) ranked as one of the top three congressmen in sending out taxpayer-supported newsletters during the first three months of the year, according to a report released Monday by a national taxpayers group. Another member of the California delegation, Rep. John Doolittle (R-Rockland), was rated the No. 1 mailer, spending $184,004.
BUSINESS
February 6, 2003 | Kathy M. Kristof, Times Staff Writer
The Internal Revenue Service's new free e-filing program is giving some Americans yet another reason to hate tax season. Less than a month old, the alliance between the IRS and private tax preparation firms that was designed to encourage more Americans to file their tax returns online is drawing some sour reviews. Among the gripes: Some taxpayers said they have been charged for services they thought were free.
NEWS
October 24, 1990 | JACK SMITH
In its Quarterly Review of Doublespeak the National Council of Teachers of English proves that this insidious distortion of the language still thrives in our society. It pervades business, politics, education, medicine and the military, and abundantly fulfills the prophecy of George Orwell in his novel "Nineteen Eighty-Four." Newspeak, as Orwell called it, was a language that served the police state by presenting lies as truth.
BUSINESS
February 6, 2003 | Kathy M. Kristof, Times Staff Writer
The Internal Revenue Service's new free e-filing program is giving some Americans yet another reason to hate tax season. Less than a month old, the alliance between the IRS and private tax preparation firms that was designed to encourage more Americans to file their tax returns online is drawing some sour reviews. Among the gripes: Some taxpayers said they have been charged for services they thought were free.
NEWS
January 4, 2001 | LAWRENCE J. MAGID, larry.magid@latimes.com
One of the most annoying aspects of some PC programs is the way they try to take control. Some load automatically when you start your computer. Others become the default application for certain types of files. Some do both. There are those who call this type of automation a feature. I call it a nuisance. It's irksome on a number of levels. First, software that loads automatically slows down the computer's start-up because Windows has to load each program into memory.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1992 | JAMES BORNEMEIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rep. Duncan Hunter (R-Coronado) ranked as one of the top three congressmen in sending out taxpayer-supported newsletters during the first three months of the year, according to a report released Monday by a national taxpayers group. Another member of the California delegation, Rep. John Doolittle (R-Rockland), was rated the No. 1 mailer, spending $184,004.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1990
The Los Angeles City Council on Tuesday exempted residential parking from the new city parking tax. In a unanimous vote, the council agreed that residents who pay to park at apartment houses or condominiums were not meant to be covered by the tax that took effect in July. It exacts a 10% levy on all commercial parking.
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