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BUSINESS
April 9, 2012 | By Michelle Maltais
Maybe Instagram needs a better filter for how it announces its deals. Its user base seems to have a twitchy reaction with every announcement. Last week, it was the end of the world as they knew it for iPhone users, who had the Instagram universe all to themselves until Android users were given the keys. It seemed a photo joust might have been in order. And now Facebook has announced it's buying the super popular photo-sharing app and social network for $1 billion. As @HmSeb put it on Twitter, Instagram is in a relationship now, and it's complicated.
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BUSINESS
October 11, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
There was a brief moment of confusion on Twitter on Friday afternoon, as what appears to be a widespread glitch wiped out users' timelines, making it impossible for them to see any tweets. The problem didn't last long, and Twitter was back to normal in no time. And of course, users quickly tweeted about the situation. PHOTOS: Top 11 hidden, cool features in Apple's  iOS  7 Here are a few funny tweets from confused users. twitter was telling me there were no tweets in my timeline and my first thought was that i was left behind #rapture - KFitz (@kfitzzz)
BUSINESS
June 14, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- Looking to shield itself from a growing public backlash over damaging revelations that it turned over user data to the National Security Agency's clandestine Internet surveillance program Prism, Facebook said late Friday it had reached an agreement to divulge some details about the government requests it receives for information about its users. Ted Ullyot, Facebook's general counsel, said the company had urged authorities "to allow more transparency and flexibility around national security-related orders we are required to comply with.
SPORTS
January 9, 2013 | By Mike Hiserman
Users of performance-enhancing drugs have not been forgiven by Hall-of-Fame-voting members of the Baseball Writers' Assn. of America. That much became clearer than ever on Wednesday. Roger Clemens was named on only 37.6% of ballots; home run king Barry Bonds on just 36.2%. To be inducted, a player must be mentioned on 75% of the ballots. But the most striking example of a player tainted by PED use was illustrated further down the list of 37 players who were potential inductees.
BUSINESS
April 12, 2012 | By Michelle Maltais
If smartphones could talk, they'd probably tell of how much smarter they are than their owners. We users put them through all the elements and then some. Fire, water, wind, snow, safari -- they've seen it all. Consumer electronics warranty provider SquareTrade asked owners to post on Facebook some of the trials and tribulations their phones endured. Several met their demise by car -- either sliding off the top of the car into traffic or just being dropped by overwhelmed or clumsy hands and getting run over as the car backed out. Some got dunked in a coffee bath like a biscotti at breakfast.
BUSINESS
April 27, 2012 | By Michelle Maltais
Most cloud-service privacy policies address how they deal with your personal information and data about your usage, but less clear is whether they would tell you when and if law enforcement sought access to your files residing on their servers. As the virtual reality online storage wars gear up, many consumers and privacy advocates have expressed concern about the policies that will be applied to the content that they would be moving into remote servers. All of the services include a clause expressing that they will act in accordance with legal requests for data.
BUSINESS
December 10, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO - Social networks have found a promising new source of advertising revenue: targeting users with ads for products they browsed online. The latest form of advertising, called "retargeting," is expected to not only get more pervasive but intensify worries over privacy. Tania Mulry, an entrepreneur from Santa Clarita, said she and other people are noticing and talking about the flood of retargeting ads. One of Mulry's students in a mobile app design class at USC was unnerved that a swimsuit she browsed on Nordstrom.com showed up as an ad on her Facebook page.
BUSINESS
August 18, 2013 | By Jessica Naziri
I'm no Type A personality, but I can say that there are few things worse than living with a terrible roommate. One of those is having to find a new roommate, fast. But finding a compatible roommate can be a long, hard quest. To help ease that burden, we scoured the Internet for roommate-finding apps and websites. Here are some of the best we found. Roommates: Finding the perfect roommate is comparable to finding a significant other. That's why the Roommates app by ApartmentList, a rental real estate search engine start-up, took a few pointers from online dating services that sync to the user's Facebook account to build a profile and pre-screen potential dates -- or, in this case, roommates.
BUSINESS
December 19, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Vine will begin letting users register for custom website URLs, like the ones they can already get on Twitter and Facebook, on Monday. The benefit to custom URLs, which look like "vine.co/salrodriguez," is it lets users direct others toward their profiles with short and easy-to-remember links, rather than links with seemingly random numbers. Users can head to vine.co on Monday to register for their custom, or vanity, URL. To do so, users will log in with the information for their Vine account.
BUSINESS
January 16, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Starbucks has come under fire in the tech world this week for the security measures -- or lack thereof -- that it uses to protect user information stored within its mobile payment app. Security researcher Daniel Wood published a report Monday that says Starbucks stores user passwords, email addresses, user names and GPS location files in plain text in its mobile payment app -- a claim that has been confirmed by the coffee company. Potentially, this put users at risk should anyone steal their smartphone.
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