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BUSINESS
June 12, 2001 | Brad Berton
Developers of the 2-million-square-foot, $66.5-million Thoroughbred Business Park near Ontario International Airport have entirely leased the industrial development's 653,759-square-foot third phase to six tenants. The park's developers--Master Development Corp. and Old English Rancho--say the combined value of the lease transactions at the final phase is just over $16.4 million. Thoroughbred's largest new tenants include Genera Corp., which leased 163,105 square feet for 10 years in a $6.
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BUSINESS
March 10, 2001
* Lillian Vernon Corp., which sells household items and clothing through its namesake catalogs and Web site, cut 12% of its salaried work force, or 40 people, and said it might have had a loss in fiscal 2001. * USFreightways Corp. said it expects first-quarter results to fall "very substantially" below estimates and that it has reduced spending and cut an unspecified number of jobs. The trucking company's shares fell $3.81 to close at $30.38 on Nasdaq. * Work.
BUSINESS
September 4, 2002 | From Bloomberg News
Roadway Corp., Yellow Corp. and Arkansas Best Corp. shares rose as the truckers began divvying up $1.5 billion or more in annual sales from collapsed rival Consolidated Freightways Corp. Home Depot Inc., the largest home-improvement retailer, said it started shifting freight to Roadway in August as Consolidated began to founder. The trucker, with sales of $2.
BUSINESS
October 23, 2001 | Times Wire Services
American Express Co. said Monday that third-quarter profit dropped 60%, hammered in part by the effects of the Sept. 11 attacks. Americans canceled vacations and avoided stores and restaurants, eroding American Express' revenue from charge cards and travel services in an already weak economy. The New York-based company, known for its signature green charge cards, warned of a profit shortfall in September, after companies shelved business trips.
BUSINESS
November 23, 2000 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last holiday season, online retailers were struggling to ship orders on time. Now they're scrambling to avoid another potentially costly pitfall--product returns that can sap profits and alienate customers. When the return season begins in earnest Dec. 26, unprepared online retailers risk being buried under a wave of unwanted Palms, ill-fitting sweaters and toys that didn't play well with kids.
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