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July 9, 2009 | Mark Wogenrich
Part meteorologist, part agronomist, part mad scientist, Mike Davis is the most feared person (at least among the women playing) at this week's 64th U.S. Women's Open. The USGA's course-setup head is the guy who, with a few orders to the folks controlling the mowers and sprinklers, can turn the Old Course into Oakmont. Or he can make it a benign home to a parade of birdie-binging 65s. It's clear which option the players predict.
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SPORTS
April 23, 2014 | By David Wharton
The upcoming U.S. Open in Pinehurst, N.C., will feature a nostalgic kind of golf course -- and perhaps a glimpse at the future of the sport. Pinehurst Resort officials have removed acre upon acre of rough that used to line the fairways of their No. 2 course. In its place, they have restored the sandy areas and wire grass that were part of architect Donald Ross' original design. "We lost the uniqueness of being this beautiful, 30 miles wide, 80 miles long, sand hills of North Carolina," course owner Bob Dedman said.
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SPORTS
June 19, 2010 | By Teddy Greenstein
Birdie: The USGA. Trimmed 34 yards off the fourth hole, leaving 290 yards. Tom Watson took a shot with a driver, saying: "It's a lot of fun to go ahead and take a crack at that green." Jerry Kelly hit a three-wood to 14 feet but missed the eagle try. Bogey: Mike Weir. Hard to believe he held the lead briefly Thursday. Weir followed his 79 on Friday with an 83 on Saturday, his highest score in 42 career U.S. Open rounds. And he made an eagle Saturday on No. 4. Birdie: At the risk of being repetitive … the USGA.
SPORTS
June 26, 2013 | By David Wharton
Thought the Casey Martin golf cart controversy was a thing of the past? Think again. It was back in 2001 when Martin, who suffers from a debilitating birth defect that makes walking painful, sued the PGA Tour for the right to drive a cart while playing tournaments. He won by citing the Americans with Disabilities Act. On Tuesday, Martin again clashed with golf officials over cart use. This time, Martin was working in his current role as the coach at Oregon, watching young players at a U.S. Junior Amateur qualifier in Oceanside, when USGA officials told him to remove his cart from the course.
SPORTS
June 20, 2010 | By Teddy Greenstein
PEBBLE BEACH, Calif. — Toward the end of his eight-minute, anti-USGA rant Sunday, Ryan Moore was asked if he would play at any future U.S Open. "Probably, just to torture myself," he told a handful of reporters off the 18th green. "I get angry, and it makes me hate golf for about two months, and then I'm OK again." Moore shot a solid two-over-par 73 on Sunday to put himself in position for a top-40 finish. But to hear him tell it, Moore got little out of the experience other than extreme frustration.
SPORTS
June 21, 2004 | Thomas Bonk, Times Staff Writer
After the first two groups played Shinnecock Hills' controversial seventh hole Sunday, the four players had three triple bogeys and a bogey. But before the next group stepped to the tee, the USGA delayed play for 10 minutes and called for a crew to drag a hose to the green and spray it with water. It was the proper, if not controversial and certainly completely surprising decision by the USGA championship committee and its chairman, Walter Driver.
SPORTS
June 29, 1991
I find it inconceivable that the PGA and the USGA have done nothing for the golf fans that were struck by lightning during the U.S. Open. The Open made $7 million from the gate alone ($175 per four-day pass times 40,000) and millions more from souvenirs. The USGA may not have a legal liability to help, but the moral responsibility is clear. DARRELL FOOKES Wilmington
SPORTS
August 2, 1997
I just read Jim Murray's moving tribute to the late Ben Hogan and I have a suggestion for Mr. Murray: If you (not seriously, I'm sure) considered yourself to be a "bad luck" charm in Mr. Hogan's life, now's your chance to make amends. Hogan won something called "the National Open" during World War II; the U.S. Open had been ostensibly canceled. Nevertheless, the USGA awarded Ben Hogan a medal for this victory that was virtually identical to the medals he earned for his four other (recognized)
SPORTS
August 17, 1986 | Associated Press
The No. 2 course at Pinehurst Country Club has been selected as the site of the 89th United States Women's Amateur Championship, America's oldest golf competition for women. The championship will be held July 31-Aug. 5, 1989. Of the eight USGA championships contested in North Carolina, four have been at Pinehurst. They were the 1967 World Senior Amateur Team Championship, the 1980 Women's and World Amateur Team Championships and the 1962 U.S. Amateur.
SPORTS
June 14, 2013 | By Mark Wogenrich
ARDMORE, Pa. -- Difficult, the U.S. Golf Assn.'s Mike Davis said this week, is "our DNA. " And making a course play difficult, the USGA's executive director said, is easy to do. For proof, Davis offered Friday's setup at Merion Golf Club, which played 95 yards shorter than its peak length and gave away only three completed rounds under par at the U.S. Open. Was that Merion proving length doesn't determine golf course difficulty, or the USGA proving it knows how to manipulate DNA?
SPORTS
June 17, 2013 | By David Wharton
One more special memory from the U.S. Open at Merion Golf Club, a moment that might have gotten lost in a weekend of dramatic birdies, costly bogeys and seemingly constant lead changes. On Sunday afternoon, as winner Justin Rose and co-runner-up Phil Mickelson duked it out, a guy nowhere near the lead made headlines. Shawn Stefani, who finished at 19-over, was teeing off at No. 17, a 229-yard, par-3 hole. His 4-iron sailed a little off line, but bounced out of the rough and rolled some 50 feet across the green.
SPORTS
June 16, 2013 | By Mark Wogenrich and Teddy Greenstein
ARDMORE, Pa. - Even though he recorded his highest score at a major since turning professional, Tiger Woods said he would like to see the U.S. Open return to Merion. He's not sure if the U.S. Golf Assn. feels the same. "Certainly as a golf course, it could definitely host another major championship," Woods said after a final-round 74 that left him 13 over for the week. "But I don't know if the USGA wants to; they make a lot of money on other venues. " Because of limited space for spectators and corporate hospitality suites, this U.S. Open probably will produce a revenue loss, USGA Executive Director Mike Davis has said.
SPORTS
June 15, 2013 | Bill Dwyre
ARDMORE, Pa. - Life went on in this leafy Philadelphia suburb Friday, despite near-catastrophic injuries inflicted on the egos of 156 golfers. They were playing in the U.S. Open. Friday, it was the U.S. Oops. It was a day featuring men thrashing around in ankle-deep grass. Also, men, looking shocked as, time after time, their putts slid past the hole. In golf, they call it the cup. Friday, at the wonderfully evil Merion Golf Club, it was a keyhole. "They've given us some really, really tough pins," said Tiger Woods, one of the golfers who escaped serious injury and is firmly in contention after 36 holes at three over par. The "they" is the United States Golf Assn., also known as the American Society of Sadism.
SPORTS
June 14, 2013 | By Mark Wogenrich
ARDMORE, Pa. -- Difficult, the U.S. Golf Assn.'s Mike Davis said this week, is "our DNA. " And making a course play difficult, the USGA's executive director said, is easy to do. For proof, Davis offered Friday's setup at Merion Golf Club, which played 95 yards shorter than its peak length and gave away only three completed rounds under par at the U.S. Open. Was that Merion proving length doesn't determine golf course difficulty, or the USGA proving it knows how to manipulate DNA?
SPORTS
June 12, 2013 | Bill Dwyre
ARDMORE, Pa. - Wednesday was a beautiful day at the Merion Golf Club. Soft clouds, perfect temperature, gently cooling breezes. It was also the day before the U.S. Golf Assn., the diabolical mastermind of the U.S. Open, hands 150 players blindfolds and offers each a final puff on a cigarette. The 113th edition of this annual golf agony is meant, as always, to make the greatest golfers in the world feel as if they are wearing starched underwear. Mike Davis, executive director of the USGA, summed up nicely Wednesday morning.
SPORTS
June 12, 2013 | By David Wharton
Lift, clean and play? Not for the big boys at the U.S. Open. United States Golf Assn. officials have insisted that no special accommodations will be made for players despite a rainy week and a forecast that calls for additional downpours during the first round on Thursday. "I'd be a fan of being able to clean the mud off," Matt Kuchar said. "I think it's one of those really rotten breaks in golf.... You drive it down the middle of the fairway and get mud on the ball.
SPORTS
June 7, 2013 | By Chris Dufresne
The United States Golf Assn. on Friday released the groupings for next week's U.S. Open at Merion Golf Club in Pennsylvania and missed a Golden Bear opportunity to titillate the Twitter and pajama blogger crowd by not pairing Tiger Woods with Sergio Garcia. Aw, shoot (under par, fellas, if you can). The USGA has a history of having fun with quirky matchups that are sometimes inside jokes. Last year the USGA played off variations of “Charles” with the grouping of Charl Schwartzel, Carl Pettersen and Charles Howell III.” The USGA made up for not pairing Woods with Garcia - a relationship that may still be a little bit too raw and sensitive - by putting Woods in an all-star threesome with Rory McIlroy and Adam Scott.
SPORTS
June 25, 1994
Monday's 20-hole playoff at the U.S. Open should be dedicated to all the duffers and hackers all over the world. Wow! WALT HARPER San Juan Capistrano In regard to Jim Murray's article of June 21, "These Guys Play by Different Rules," I could not agree more. When I play golf with my son-in-law, he doesn't give me any drops like the USGA officials handed out in the U.S. Open. And I even permit him to sleep with my daughter seven nights a week. ROBERT L. WEST Calabasas
SPORTS
June 11, 2013
ARDMORE, Pa. - Last we heard from Luke Donald, he was feasting on perfectly marbled steak after a victory in Japan yielded a shipment of 200 pounds of Miyazaki beef. "Brought a few here this week," Donald said. "Hopefully some good protein. " Asked if the rib-eyes and filets will give him a few extra yards off the tee, Donald grinned and replied, "I wish it was that easy. " The world's former No. 1 player - he's No. 6 now after a so-so start to the year - has yet to win a major.
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