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April 24, 2010 | From Reuters
A strong earthquake with a magnitude of 6.1 struck in the Moluccas about 120 miles north of the Indonesian island of Ambon, the U.S. Geological Survey said on Saturday. There were no immediate reports of casualties or damage. The quake was measured at a depth of about 33 miles.
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WORLD
April 18, 2014 | By Tracy Wilkinson, This post has been updated with the latest developments.
MEXICO CITY -- A powerful earthquake shook a wide area of Mexico on Friday, terrifying residents and sending many fleeing into the streets. There were no initial reports of injuries and only minor damage in the capital, though information from elsewhere in central Mexico was still coming in. The United States Geological Survey said the quake at about 9:30 a.m. local time had a preliminary magnitude of 7.2, which would make it one of the stronger...
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2014 | By Robert J. Lopez
Officials with the U.S. Geological Survey were advising Southern California residents Monday evening about a hoax letter that is warning of an "impending large quake. " The letter with the agency's logo was apparently being sent to residents in Orange County, urging them to be prepared for a large quake. "California is issuing a statewide warning," the letter states. The agency advises residents to check the USGS website for the latest earthquake information. The letter comes in the wake of Friday's 5.1 magnitude temblor centered in La Habra.
NATIONAL
April 5, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
A retired librarian became the first of the at least 30 people killed in last month's landslide in Washington to be memorialized as several hundred people gathered to remember her life Saturday afternoon. Two weeks ago, Linda McPherson was reading a newspaper alongside her husband of 46 years when, in a quick blast of mud, she was killed at the age of 69. Gary McPherson was left injured in a freezing pile of the muck. Rescuers haven't abandoned the Snohomish County town of Oso. Thirteen people remained missing as of Saturday night.
NEWS
July 11, 2013 | By Patt Morrison
Where would science be without its brilliant amateurs? Not even close to where it is now. The likes of Gregor Mendel, Michael Faraday, Joseph Priestley -- even Benjamin Franklin -- and more put discipline to enthusiasm and taught us about natural selection, electromagnetism, chemistry and electricity. For centuries, the professional scientist -- the trained “natural philosopher” -- barely existed. Leonardo da Vinci had to paint pictures to keep the pot boiling so he could dream and imagine science and engineering far into the future.
SCIENCE
March 16, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
U.S. Geological Survey officials have chosen a name for the 9.0 temblor that struck Japan last week. They're calling it the Tohoku earthquake ? shortened from the original name used in Japan. Tohoku is a region in the northern part of Honshu, Japan's largest island. Though the region ? encompassing six of the island's northernmost prefectures ? sits north of the massive quake's offshore epicenter, it became its namesake because it takes up much of the area shaken by the earthquake's approximately 250-mile-long rupture area.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2014 | By Los Angeles Times staff, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
The U.S. Geological Survey is warning the public a letter that purports to be from the agency asking Orange County residents to be prepared for "a sizable earthquake" is a hoax. The letter featuring the agency's logo was apparently sent to area residents and circulated online. The letter claims "California is issuing a statewide warning" and five communities -- Westminster, Santa Ana, Long Beach, Newport Beach and La Habra -- could experience a 7.4 magnitude "tremor. " In a post on its Facebook account , the USGS said it was aware of the letter that "uses our logo.
NEWS
March 17, 2014 | By Ari Bloomekatz, Rong-Gong Lin II and Matt Stevens, This post had been corrected. See note below for details
Seismologists say Monday's magnitude 4.4 temblor near Westwood could mark the beginning of the end for L.A.'s years-long "earthquake drought. " Typically, they would expect a 4.4-sized earthquake about once a year in the Los Angeles Basin, but that hasn't happened for years. “We don't know if this is the end of the earthquake drought we've had over the last few years, and we won't know for many months,” said Caltech seismologist Egill Hauksson. FORESHOCK? What the odds are The magnitude 4.4 earthquake that struck near Westwood at 6:25 a.m. is the most significant shake in Southern California since a 5.5 earthquake hit Chino Hills in 2008.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 2013 | By Rong-Gong Lin II and Shelby Grad
The U.S. Geological Survey this week released a report assessing the tsunami risk in California. The research simulated a 9.1 quake off the Alaska coast that would send damaging waves to California. Here are some highlights. 1) What are the parts of Southern California most vulnerable to tsunami flooding? The USGS study listed several areas, including Marina del Rey and the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach as well as the low-lying coastal areas extending from the ports to Newport Beach.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2014 | By Rong-Gong Lin II
The magnitude 5.1 earthquake that rattled Southern California on Friday was a 10-second reminder of a fault that seismologists believe can produce a catastrophic disaster. The Puente Hills thrust fault is so dangerous because of its location, running from the suburbs of northern Orange County, through the San Gabriel Valley and under the skyscrapers of downtown Los Angeles before ending in Hollywood. Experts say a major, magnitude 7.5 earthquake on the fault could do more damage to the heart of Los Angeles than the dreaded Big One on the San Andreas fault, which is on the outskirts of metropolitan Southern California.
NATIONAL
April 3, 2014 | By Richard Simon
WASHINGTON -- A group of lawmakers is hoping the recent string of Southern California temblors will jolt Congress into funding an earthquake warning system. The lawmakers are seeking some of the $38.3 million needed to build the system on the West Coast and the $16.1 million a year needed to operate and maintain it. "Even a few seconds of warning before the next Big One will allow people to seek cover, automatically slow or stop trains, pause surgeries and more -- and the benefits of this small investment now will be paid back many times over after the first damaging quake,'" said Rep. Adam B. Schiff (D-Burbank)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2014 | By Los Angeles Times staff, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
The U.S. Geological Survey is warning the public a letter that purports to be from the agency asking Orange County residents to be prepared for "a sizable earthquake" is a hoax. The letter featuring the agency's logo was apparently sent to area residents and circulated online. The letter claims "California is issuing a statewide warning" and five communities -- Westminster, Santa Ana, Long Beach, Newport Beach and La Habra -- could experience a 7.4 magnitude "tremor. " In a post on its Facebook account , the USGS said it was aware of the letter that "uses our logo.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2014 | By Robert J. Lopez
Officials with the U.S. Geological Survey were advising Southern California residents Monday evening about a hoax letter that is warning of an "impending large quake. " The letter with the agency's logo was apparently being sent to residents in Orange County, urging them to be prepared for a large quake. "California is issuing a statewide warning," the letter states. The agency advises residents to check the USGS website for the latest earthquake information. The letter comes in the wake of Friday's 5.1 magnitude temblor centered in La Habra.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2014 | By Hector Becerra and Rosanna Xia
The magnitude 5.1 La Habra earthquake that shook Southern California isn't going into the seismic history books for its modest size and small damage totals. But it was an event on social media, which transmitted stories and images of the quake and its many aftershocks with a speed and breadth that left seismologists and emergency personnel taking notice. The first signs of damage came not from authorities but from residents posting photos on Facebook of broken dishes and fallen cabinets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2014 | By Rosanna Xia and Hector Becerra
An estimated 17 million people felt Friday's magnitude 5.1 quake centered in La Habra. U.S. Geological Survey seismologist David Wald said officials received valuable information from the 16,000 reports by individuals who used the Did You Feel It? reporting system on the agency website. “About one in 1,000 are actually reporting... That's a pretty good [data] sample. If you're polling for political responses, that would be a huge sample,” said Wald, who co-created and operates the DYFI system.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2014 | By Rong-Gong Lin II
The Puente Hills fault, which scientists believe could be responsible for Friday's 5.1 earthquake in La Habra, is considered very dangerous. Here are some basic questions about the fault. Q: What would be the difference in shaking between a 5.1 quake and a truly huge quake? Friday night's earthquake was caused by the underground fault slipping for half a second, said U.S. Geological Survey seismologist Lucy Jones, prompting about 10 seconds of shaking at the surface. But a 7.5 quake on the Puente Hills fault could cause the fault to slip for 20 seconds - and the shaking could last far longer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2014 | By Rong-Gong Lin II
The Puente Hills fault, which scientists believe could be responsible for Friday's 5.1 earthquake in La Habra, is considered very dangerous. Here are some basic questions about the fault. Q: What would be the difference in shaking between a 5.1 quake and a truly huge quake? Friday night's earthquake was caused by the underground fault slipping for half a second, said U.S. Geological Survey seismologist Lucy Jones, prompting about 10 seconds of shaking at the surface. But a 7.5 quake on the Puente Hills fault could cause the fault to slip for 20 seconds - and the shaking could last far longer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 2013 | By Kate Mather, Rong-Gong Lin II and Kurt Streeter
The magnitude of Wednesday's earthquake off the Santa Barbara coast has been upgraded to 4.8, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. The earthquake -- which struck at 7:38 a.m. about five miles west of UC Santa Barbara -- was initially reported at magnitude 4.9, then adjusted to 4.6, according to the USGS website. It was upgraded by late morning. The Santa Barbara area is home is a number of earthquake faults, the largest of which is the Santa Ynez Fault, which is 80 miles long and runs just north of the city.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2014 | By Rong-Gong Lin II
The magnitude 5.1 earthquake that rattled Southern California on Friday was a 10-second reminder of a fault that seismologists believe can produce a catastrophic disaster. The Puente Hills thrust fault is so dangerous because of its location, running from the suburbs of northern Orange County, through the San Gabriel Valley and under the skyscrapers of downtown Los Angeles before ending in Hollywood. Experts say a major, magnitude 7.5 earthquake on the fault could do more damage to the heart of Los Angeles than the dreaded Big One on the San Andreas fault, which is on the outskirts of metropolitan Southern California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2014 | By Rong-Gong Lin II
A prototype earthquake early-warning system worked again Friday night, giving seismologists in Pasadena about a four-second heads-up before shaking was felt from the magnitude 5.1 quake that struck near La Habra. The system is being tested by a team of scientists on a U.S. Geological Survey project to create a statewide network. USGS seismologist Lucy Jones has said the system works because while earthquakes travel at the speed of sound, sensors that initially detect the shaking near the epicenter of a quake can send a message faster -- at the speed of light -- to warn residents farther away that the quake is coming.
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