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March 17, 2014 | By Ari Bloomekatz, Rong-Gong Lin II and Matt Stevens, This post had been corrected. See note below for details
Seismologists say Monday's magnitude 4.4 temblor near Westwood could mark the beginning of the end for L.A.'s years-long "earthquake drought. " Typically, they would expect a 4.4-sized earthquake about once a year in the Los Angeles Basin, but that hasn't happened for years. “We don't know if this is the end of the earthquake drought we've had over the last few years, and we won't know for many months,” said Caltech seismologist Egill Hauksson. FORESHOCK? What the odds are The magnitude 4.4 earthquake that struck near Westwood at 6:25 a.m. is the most significant shake in Southern California since a 5.5 earthquake hit Chino Hills in 2008.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2014 | By Hector Becerra and Rosanna Xia
The magnitude 5.1 La Habra earthquake that shook Southern California isn't going into the seismic history books for its modest size and small damage totals. But it was an event on social media, which transmitted stories and images of the quake and its many aftershocks with a speed and breadth that left seismologists and emergency personnel taking notice. The first signs of damage came not from authorities but from residents posting photos on Facebook of broken dishes and fallen cabinets.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2014 | By Rong-Gong Lin II
The magnitude 5.1 earthquake that rattled Southern California on Friday was a 10-second reminder of a fault that seismologists believe can produce a catastrophic disaster. The Puente Hills thrust fault is so dangerous because of its location, running from the suburbs of northern Orange County, through the San Gabriel Valley and under the skyscrapers of downtown Los Angeles before ending in Hollywood. Experts say a major, magnitude 7.5 earthquake on the fault could do more damage to the heart of Los Angeles than the dreaded Big One on the San Andreas fault, which is on the outskirts of metropolitan Southern California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2014 | By Rong-Gong Lin II
The magnitude 5.1 earthquake that rattled Southern California on Friday was a 10-second reminder of a fault that seismologists believe can produce a catastrophic disaster. The Puente Hills thrust fault is so dangerous because of its location, running from the suburbs of northern Orange County, through the San Gabriel Valley and under the skyscrapers of downtown Los Angeles before ending in Hollywood. Experts say a major, magnitude 7.5 earthquake on the fault could do more damage to the heart of Los Angeles than the dreaded Big One on the San Andreas fault, which is on the outskirts of metropolitan Southern California.
WORLD
April 24, 2010 | From Reuters
A strong earthquake with a magnitude of 6.1 struck in the Moluccas about 120 miles north of the Indonesian island of Ambon, the U.S. Geological Survey said on Saturday. There were no immediate reports of casualties or damage. The quake was measured at a depth of about 33 miles.
NEWS
July 11, 2013 | By Patt Morrison
Where would science be without its brilliant amateurs? Not even close to where it is now. The likes of Gregor Mendel, Michael Faraday, Joseph Priestley -- even Benjamin Franklin -- and more put discipline to enthusiasm and taught us about natural selection, electromagnetism, chemistry and electricity. For centuries, the professional scientist -- the trained “natural philosopher” -- barely existed. Leonardo da Vinci had to paint pictures to keep the pot boiling so he could dream and imagine science and engineering far into the future.
SCIENCE
March 16, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
U.S. Geological Survey officials have chosen a name for the 9.0 temblor that struck Japan last week. They're calling it the Tohoku earthquake ? shortened from the original name used in Japan. Tohoku is a region in the northern part of Honshu, Japan's largest island. Though the region ? encompassing six of the island's northernmost prefectures ? sits north of the massive quake's offshore epicenter, it became its namesake because it takes up much of the area shaken by the earthquake's approximately 250-mile-long rupture area.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2014 | By Hector Becerra and Rosanna Xia
The magnitude 5.1 La Habra earthquake that shook Southern California isn't going into the seismic history books for its modest size and small damage totals. But it was an event on social media, which transmitted stories and images of the quake and its many aftershocks with a speed and breadth that left seismologists and emergency personnel taking notice. The first signs of damage came not from authorities but from residents posting photos on Facebook of broken dishes and fallen cabinets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 2013 | By Rong-Gong Lin II and Shelby Grad
The U.S. Geological Survey this week released a report assessing the tsunami risk in California. The research simulated a 9.1 quake off the Alaska coast that would send damaging waves to California. Here are some highlights. 1) What are the parts of Southern California most vulnerable to tsunami flooding? The USGS study listed several areas, including Marina del Rey and the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach as well as the low-lying coastal areas extending from the ports to Newport Beach.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 2014 | By Shelby Grad, This post has been updated. See the notes below for details.
A magnitude 6.9 earthquake occurred off the coast of Eureka in Northern California on Sunday night, the U.S. Geological Survey reported. The temblor hit at 10:18 p.m. 50 miles west of Eureka in Humboldt County. According to the USGS, the earthquake was felt over a large swath of the North Coast as well as other parts of Northern California. There were no immediate reports of injuries or tsunami warnings. [Updated, 10:49 p.m. PST March 9: According to the USGS, the quake was felt over a large swath of the North Coast as well as other parts of Northern California.
NEWS
March 28, 2014 | By Ken Schwencke
Two shallow earthquakes were reported Friday evening one mile from Brea, according to the U.S. Geological Survey: A magnitude 2.7 earthquake at a depth of 0.6 miles occurred at 9:45 p.m., and a magnitude 2.9 temblor at a depth of 3.1 miles followed at at 9:47 p.m. According to the USGS, the epicenters were one mile from La Habra, two miles from Rowland Heights and four miles from Fullerton. In the last 10 days, there have been four earthquakes magnitude 3.0 or greater centered nearby.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 2014 | By Emily Alpert Reyes
An oil and gas industry association blasted a push by several members of the Los Angeles City Council to investigate whether hydraulic fracturing and other forms of oil well stimulation played any role in the earthquake that rattled Los Angeles on Monday, calling the move "appallingly irresponsible. " "It does not surprise us that the handful of extremist environmental organizations ... would attempt to make an entirely unfounded connection between hydraulic fracturing and the earthquake," Western States Petroleum Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2014 | By Ari Bloomekatz and Ruben Vives
A magnitude 4.4 earthquake that struck near Westwood provided an early morning jolt for Greater Los Angeles, but there were no immediate reports of damage or injuries. The quake struck at 6:25 a.m. at a depth of 5.3 miles , according to the  U.S. Geological Survey . The quake was centered near the intersection of Mulholland Drive and the 405 Freeway. A shallow magnitude 2.7 earthquake followed up at 7:23 a.m. four miles from Westwood, according to the USGS. That quake was reported at a depth of 4.3 miles.  LIVE BLOG: 4.4 earthquake strikes Los Angeles The Los Angeles Fire Department was in "earthquake emergency mode" as crews surveyed the city by air and on the ground, but public safety officials across the region said there did not appear to be any significant damage.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2014 | By Ari Bloomekatz and Rong-Gong Lin II
The magnitude 4.4 earthquake that struck near Westwood is the most significant shake in Southern California since a 5.5 earthquake hit Chino Hills in 2008, a U.S. Geological Survey seismologist told reporters at a news conference Monday morning. Robert Graves said there have been at least six aftershocks since the 6:25 a.m. earthquake. The largest so far has been a magnitude 2.7 earthquake that struck five miles northwest of Westwood. Graves said there is always the small possibility that the 4.4 earthquake was only a prelude to an equal or stronger shake.
NEWS
March 17, 2014 | By Ari Bloomekatz, Rong-Gong Lin II and Matt Stevens, This post had been corrected. See note below for details
Seismologists say Monday's magnitude 4.4 temblor near Westwood could mark the beginning of the end for L.A.'s years-long "earthquake drought. " Typically, they would expect a 4.4-sized earthquake about once a year in the Los Angeles Basin, but that hasn't happened for years. “We don't know if this is the end of the earthquake drought we've had over the last few years, and we won't know for many months,” said Caltech seismologist Egill Hauksson. FORESHOCK? What the odds are The magnitude 4.4 earthquake that struck near Westwood at 6:25 a.m. is the most significant shake in Southern California since a 5.5 earthquake hit Chino Hills in 2008.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2014 | By Ari Bloomekatz
Dozens of aftershocks have occurred since Sunday's magnitude-6.9 earthquake that rattled Northern California, the state's largest temblor in nearly a decade. The largest of the aftershocks, near Ferndale in Humboldt County, measured a magnitude 4.5, and officials expected them to continue for several days. Overall, the aftershocks have been getting smaller and less frequent. Sunday's quake caused no damage or injuries because it was centered 50 miles off the coast of Eureka and occurred at a depth of "10 miles beneath the Pacific seabed," according to the U.S. Geological Survey . By the time the seismic energy reached the shore, it had dissipated significantly.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2014 | By Ari Bloomekatz and Rong-Gong Lin II
The magnitude 4.4 earthquake that struck near Westwood is the most significant shake in Southern California since a 5.5 earthquake hit Chino Hills in 2008, a U.S. Geological Survey seismologist told reporters at a news conference Monday morning. Robert Graves said there have been at least six aftershocks since the 6:25 a.m. earthquake. The largest so far has been a magnitude 2.7 earthquake that struck five miles northwest of Westwood. Graves said there is always the small possibility that the 4.4 earthquake was only a prelude to an equal or stronger shake.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 2013 | By Kate Mather, Rong-Gong Lin II and Kurt Streeter
The magnitude of Wednesday's earthquake off the Santa Barbara coast has been upgraded to 4.8, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. The earthquake -- which struck at 7:38 a.m. about five miles west of UC Santa Barbara -- was initially reported at magnitude 4.9, then adjusted to 4.6, according to the USGS website. It was upgraded by late morning. The Santa Barbara area is home is a number of earthquake faults, the largest of which is the Santa Ynez Fault, which is 80 miles long and runs just north of the city.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2014 | By Shelby Grad
A magnitude 6.9 earthquake off the coast of Eureka in Northern California on Sunday night was felt as long and slow by residents from San Francisco to southern Oregon. Eureka police have told several Northern California media outlets that the department has no immediate reports of injuries or major damage. The Humboldt County Sheriff's Department also said it had no reports of injuries. "This lasted longer than any earthquake I've ever felt," Raquel Maytorena, 52, who lives about a mile from the coast in Ferndale near Eureka, told The Times.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2014 | By Ari Bloomekatz and Richie Duchon
The magnitude 6.9 earthquake that rattled Northern California on Sunday was the state's largest temblor in nearly a decade. But it caused no damage or injuries. That's because the quake was centered 50 miles off the coast of Eureka and occurred at a depth of "10 miles beneath the Pacific seabed," according to the U.S. Geological Survey. By the time the seismic energy reached the shore, it had dissipated significantly. The USGS said the North Coast felt only moderate to light shaking.
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