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NEWS
May 9, 2012 | By Ian Duncan
WASHINGTON -- The United States Postal Service stayed the sword hanging over thousands of rural post offices, opting instead to cut opening hours in a bid to stem devastating financial losses. The USPS estimates that the plan will save $500 million a year once it is fully implemented in 2014. A previous proposal to close down more than 3,000 rural post offices completely would have saved $200 million a year. Under the proposal outlined Wednesday, 13,167 post offices will open for between two and six hours a day. A spokeswoman for the USPS said no post offices will be forced to close, although communities could choose closure and switch to home delivery.
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BUSINESS
April 24, 2014 | By Ricardo Lopez
Members of the American Postal Workers Union are launching protests Thursday in 27 states to decry a partnership between the U.S. Postal Service and office supply company Staples Inc. to run postal counters at its retail stores.   The agreement between the Postal Service and Staples, announced in November, created a pilot program to operate 82 postal counters at Staples locations across the country. The quick-service counters will be staffed by Staples employees.  Organizers plan to demonstrate at a Staples location in downtown Los Angeles on Thursday, one of four protests planned in California.
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BUSINESS
August 21, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
The U.S. Postal Service didn't do itself any favors with Homer and the rest of the Simpsons -- less than a third of the 1 billion stamps created to commemorate the cartoon family have been sold. The USPS wasted $1.2 million in printing costs overproducing 682 million stamps, according to an audit from the agency's inspector general. Just 318 million Simpsons stamps, which were created to mark the characters' two-decade stint on television, were sold in 2009 and 2010. ( Hat tip to Bloomberg )
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 2014 | By Ari Bloomekatz
A bomb squad called in to investigate a loud ticking sound emanating from a U.S. Postal Service mailbox in Westlake did not find any explosives Monday, instead finding a more obvious explanation -- a clock. Authorities were called just before 7 a.m. by a pedestrian who walked by the mailbox near the intersection of James M. Wood Boulevard and Blaine Street and heard a loud ticking noise, said Los Angeles Police Lt. Orlando Chandler. When a bomb squad responded to the mailbox to investigate, it "turned out to be an alarm clock," Chandler said.
MAGAZINE
September 10, 2000 | Nelson Handel
They're awkward looking, climate-control-challenged, uncomfortable and have a disturbing tendency to tip and roll above 40 mph. Yet in vehicularly unimpressible Southern California, everyone sneaks a peek when a customized postal jeep rumbles past. If you don't own one yet, though, you're plumb out of luck; environmental and safety concerns forced a halt to public sales in 1998. The U.S. Postal Service began decommissioning the remaining 450 in the L.A.
OPINION
August 12, 2012
Re "The business of mail," Editorial, Aug. 7 The Times touches only briefly on the primary reason for what many are calling a manufactured crisis in theU.S. Postal Service. In 2006, Congress required the USPS to pre-fund 75 years' worth of worker health benefits in the next 10 years. This means funding for workers not even hired yet. No other agency or corporation is required to do this. Congress should change this requirement to match the usual funding requirements for other agencies.
NEWS
April 10, 2013 | By Wes Venteicher
WASHINGTON--The US Postal Service has canceled a plan to end Saturday letter delivery this summer, conceding Wednesday that Congress had won a recent legal bout over the agency's attempt to cut costs. The USPS had announced in February that letter delivery would drop to five days starting Aug. 5. But Congress responded by adding a rider on a spending bill mandating Saturday delivery. The Postal Service's Board of Governors reviewed Congress' decision and determined Congress had the authority to make it, it said in a press release Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1998
Reports by the U.S. Postal Service of producing a "profit" of $1.26 billion in 1997 (Dec. 27) need to be taken with several grains of salt. The USPS is a government agency, not a "for real" business. It enjoys billions of dollars of taxpayer subsidies. Not only does it receive appropriate tax dollars for operations, but it is exempt from all sorts of taxes that real businesses pay. If the USPS were a true public service, it should be planning to use its $1.26-billion cash surplus to reduce postage rates after paying off its long-term debt.
BUSINESS
July 10, 2013 | By Shan Li
Britain is privatizing its Royal Mail postal service through a public stock offering within the next nine months. The step is expected as the British government has been giving the Royal Mail a big overhaul in preparation for going public, including paying its whopping $6.9-billion pension fund deficit and bolstering its profit. So far, so good. Revenue from parcel deliveries was up 13% in the last fiscal year, thanks to the growing popularity of online shopping. Overall profit climbed to $600.5 million, from $226.5 million in the previous year.
NATIONAL
February 7, 2013 | By David Horsey
As AOL used to say, “You've got mail!” But maybe not on Saturdays if the mail you are looking for is being delivered by the much-maligned “snail mail” of the United States Postal Service. On Wednesday, the USPS announced Saturday delivery of letters would be eliminated by August in order to save $2 billion annually. The Postal Service has been struggling financially for a long time, as we all know, so this sort of cutback is hardly surprising. As the latest reduction in service is discussed and debated, though, it is worth remembering that the Postal Service's troubles are not entirely a result of the historic shift in how Americans communicate with one another.
BUSINESS
July 10, 2013 | By Shan Li
Britain is privatizing its Royal Mail postal service through a public stock offering within the next nine months. The step is expected as the British government has been giving the Royal Mail a big overhaul in preparation for going public, including paying its whopping $6.9-billion pension fund deficit and bolstering its profit. So far, so good. Revenue from parcel deliveries was up 13% in the last fiscal year, thanks to the growing popularity of online shopping. Overall profit climbed to $600.5 million, from $226.5 million in the previous year.
OPINION
April 11, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
When the U.S. Postal Service announced in February that it would end Saturday mail delivery this summer, most Americans reacted with a mixture of wistfulness and resignation. Yes, it was sad that the mail carrier wouldn't be dropping off letters on Saturday anymore, but scaling back to five days was a necessary concession to the agency's financial problems and a reflection of changes in communication wrought by the Internet. But not everyone saw it that way: The unions representing postal employees and their champions on Capitol Hill were especially determined to block the change, and a continuing resolution passed by Congress last month prohibited the USPS from curtailing service.
NEWS
April 10, 2013 | By Wes Venteicher
WASHINGTON--The US Postal Service has canceled a plan to end Saturday letter delivery this summer, conceding Wednesday that Congress had won a recent legal bout over the agency's attempt to cut costs. The USPS had announced in February that letter delivery would drop to five days starting Aug. 5. But Congress responded by adding a rider on a spending bill mandating Saturday delivery. The Postal Service's Board of Governors reviewed Congress' decision and determined Congress had the authority to make it, it said in a press release Wednesday.
OPINION
February 8, 2013
Re "Saturday mail delivery slated to end in August," Feb. 7 It's called the U.S. Postal Service because it is a service, not a corporation. Who decided the Postal Service must be profitable? Do other government agencies, like the Defense Department and the Department of Education, have to turn a profit? Benjamin Franklin was the first postmaster general, and the Post Office has effectively served the American people for 237 years. But now it is under attack because, gasp, it's losing money.
NATIONAL
February 7, 2013 | By David Horsey
As AOL used to say, “You've got mail!” But maybe not on Saturdays if the mail you are looking for is being delivered by the much-maligned “snail mail” of the United States Postal Service. On Wednesday, the USPS announced Saturday delivery of letters would be eliminated by August in order to save $2 billion annually. The Postal Service has been struggling financially for a long time, as we all know, so this sort of cutback is hardly surprising. As the latest reduction in service is discussed and debated, though, it is worth remembering that the Postal Service's troubles are not entirely a result of the historic shift in how Americans communicate with one another.
SPORTS
October 10, 2012 | By Houston Mitchell and Lance Pugmire
  Join us for a live Google+ Hangout at 1 p.m. when Times reporter Lance Pugmire and columnist Helene Elliott will discuss Lance Armstrong. The live video chat will take place on this blog post. Until then, you can watch a replay of our Lakers and Clippers chat from earlier today above. Later today, the United States Anti-Doping Agency , which banned seven-time Tour de France winner Lance Armstrong from competition for life in August, is set to reveal the findings that led to the discipline Wednesday.
BUSINESS
August 21, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
The U.S. Postal Service didn't do itself any favors with Homer and the rest of the Simpsons -- less than a third of the 1 billion stamps created to commemorate the cartoon family have been sold. The USPS wasted $1.2 million in printing costs overproducing 682 million stamps, according to an audit from the agency's inspector general. Just 318 million Simpsons stamps, which were created to mark the characters' two-decade stint on television, were sold in 2009 and 2010. ( Hat tip to Bloomberg )
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