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NATIONAL
February 25, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
A $52-million project will renovate and rebuild the USS Arizona Memorial Visitor Center, officials said Friday. The center is on unstable ground and slowly sinking below the ocean water in Pearl Harbor. Built in 1980, the center has been releveled five times, even as some of the supporting columns have sunk more than 30 inches into the shaky soil, causing cracks and other stresses on the two buildings.
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NEWS
July 12, 2013 | By Jay Jones
The USS Missouri, one of the United States' most iconic warships, this summer marks the 15 th anniversary of its permanent mooring at Pearl Harbor.  The ship saw action in World War II, the Korean conflict, Operation Desert Storm and a motion picture. It arrived in Honolulu in June 1998 and is moored bow to bow with the submerged USS Arizona, sunk in the attack on Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941.  Visitors to the Battleship Missouri Memorial are immersed in the history of World War II, beginning with America's entry into the war after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor and concluding with the Axis power's signing of documents of surrender on Sept.
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NEWS
December 7, 2000 | From Associated Press
On the morning of Dec. 7, 1941, Lewis P. Robinson stood on a dock at Pearl Harbor waiting for a boat to return him to the USS Arizona after an overnight shore leave. The clear blue skies suddenly darkened as a wave of Japanese planes descended, raining bombs on the harbor. Within minutes, blasts ripped open the 608-foot battleship Arizona, killing 1,177 crew members and sinking the ship.
NATIONAL
February 25, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
A $52-million project will renovate and rebuild the USS Arizona Memorial Visitor Center, officials said Friday. The center is on unstable ground and slowly sinking below the ocean water in Pearl Harbor. Built in 1980, the center has been releveled five times, even as some of the supporting columns have sunk more than 30 inches into the shaky soil, causing cracks and other stresses on the two buildings.
OPINION
March 8, 1998
Re "Resolve This Wartime Injustice," editorial, Feb. 25: Yes, absolutely! I agree reparations should be paid--but paid to the families of the American military men entombed in the sunken hulk of the USS Arizona. Japan should definitely "redress this outrage with an apology and economic compensation to the" heroes "of the ordeal." To further insult the memory of American heroes by paying reparations to Japanese interned in relocation camps is bordering on treason! What Quisling wrote this editorial?
MAGAZINE
August 6, 1995
Why can't we put to rest all the agonizing over whether the United States did the right thing in developing and using the atomic bomb ("The Tough Question," by Mary Palevsky Granados, June 25)? We had no choice. The basic principles of atomic power were well known, and both Russia and Germany were working on the development of nuclear weapons. I was an American soldier stationed in China at that time. I remember well the roars of relief and approval that went up when the news of Hiroshima and Nagasaki were posted on the company bulletin board.
NEWS
July 12, 2013 | By Jay Jones
The USS Missouri, one of the United States' most iconic warships, this summer marks the 15 th anniversary of its permanent mooring at Pearl Harbor.  The ship saw action in World War II, the Korean conflict, Operation Desert Storm and a motion picture. It arrived in Honolulu in June 1998 and is moored bow to bow with the submerged USS Arizona, sunk in the attack on Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941.  Visitors to the Battleship Missouri Memorial are immersed in the history of World War II, beginning with America's entry into the war after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor and concluding with the Axis power's signing of documents of surrender on Sept.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 1999
At the time we heard about the attack at Pearl Harbor, we were unaware that my cousin was there, stationed aboard the USS Arizona. The last time I had seen him, he was in his uniform, looking so handsome and happy to be off to a great adventure overseas. The true reality and sadness of his death did not come until many years later when I visited Honolulu. I took the Navy tour to the Arizona Memorial where I read his name written on the marble tablet, and looked into the water to see the eerie shadow of the hull of the Arizona that was the tomb for so many young men, along with my cousin Jimmy Moore.
NEWS
May 21, 1995 | RANDOLPH E. SCHMID, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Navy Fireman Wes Heidt lost his life the day World War II came to America, while Army Technician Donald Cortwright was on the scene at war's end. The personal stories of these men and many others make the humanity--and inhumanity--of war real in a new National Archives exhibit. "I am safer here on this battleboat than I would be driving back and forth to work if I was home," Wesley John Heidt reassured his mother in Los Angeles in one of the first letters to greet exhibit visitors.
NATIONAL
March 24, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Plans are underway in Honolulu to build a $34-million visitors center and museum at the USS Arizona Memorial, and officials say they will address concerns about whether it is appropriate to put a retail center near Pearl Harbor. Veterans groups have said a private retail center would be crass for a national park that honors 2,390 people killed in the Dec. 7, 1941, attack.
NATIONAL
March 24, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Plans are underway in Honolulu to build a $34-million visitors center and museum at the USS Arizona Memorial, and officials say they will address concerns about whether it is appropriate to put a retail center near Pearl Harbor. Veterans groups have said a private retail center would be crass for a national park that honors 2,390 people killed in the Dec. 7, 1941, attack.
NEWS
December 7, 2000 | From Associated Press
On the morning of Dec. 7, 1941, Lewis P. Robinson stood on a dock at Pearl Harbor waiting for a boat to return him to the USS Arizona after an overnight shore leave. The clear blue skies suddenly darkened as a wave of Japanese planes descended, raining bombs on the harbor. Within minutes, blasts ripped open the 608-foot battleship Arizona, killing 1,177 crew members and sinking the ship.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 1999
At the time we heard about the attack at Pearl Harbor, we were unaware that my cousin was there, stationed aboard the USS Arizona. The last time I had seen him, he was in his uniform, looking so handsome and happy to be off to a great adventure overseas. The true reality and sadness of his death did not come until many years later when I visited Honolulu. I took the Navy tour to the Arizona Memorial where I read his name written on the marble tablet, and looked into the water to see the eerie shadow of the hull of the Arizona that was the tomb for so many young men, along with my cousin Jimmy Moore.
OPINION
March 8, 1998
Re "Resolve This Wartime Injustice," editorial, Feb. 25: Yes, absolutely! I agree reparations should be paid--but paid to the families of the American military men entombed in the sunken hulk of the USS Arizona. Japan should definitely "redress this outrage with an apology and economic compensation to the" heroes "of the ordeal." To further insult the memory of American heroes by paying reparations to Japanese interned in relocation camps is bordering on treason! What Quisling wrote this editorial?
MAGAZINE
August 6, 1995
Why can't we put to rest all the agonizing over whether the United States did the right thing in developing and using the atomic bomb ("The Tough Question," by Mary Palevsky Granados, June 25)? We had no choice. The basic principles of atomic power were well known, and both Russia and Germany were working on the development of nuclear weapons. I was an American soldier stationed in China at that time. I remember well the roars of relief and approval that went up when the news of Hiroshima and Nagasaki were posted on the company bulletin board.
NEWS
May 21, 1995 | RANDOLPH E. SCHMID, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Navy Fireman Wes Heidt lost his life the day World War II came to America, while Army Technician Donald Cortwright was on the scene at war's end. The personal stories of these men and many others make the humanity--and inhumanity--of war real in a new National Archives exhibit. "I am safer here on this battleboat than I would be driving back and forth to work if I was home," Wesley John Heidt reassured his mother in Los Angeles in one of the first letters to greet exhibit visitors.
TRAVEL
August 20, 1989
"A War of Remembrance in Nagasaki" (Savvy Traveler, Aug. 6) was a very touching article. One must agree with Hideko Yoshiyama's words as she tends the Atomic Bomb Museum: "People should come here and see what happened . . . they will know never to do it again." Yes, yes, of course. Perhaps they will also visit Pearl Harbor to see the USS Arizona Memorial, and know what it really means to never do it again. ROY ROUDINE Los Alamitos
TRAVEL
November 6, 1994
The most popular visitor attractions in the Aloha State Attraction Island Visitors USS Arizona Memorial Oahu 1,635,591 Volcanoes National park Big Island 1,250,000 Dole Plantation Oahu 893,000 Polynesian Cultural Center Oahu 838,000 Honolulu Zoo Oahu 704,424 Sea Life Park Oahu 638,973 Iao Valley State Monument Maui 589,000 Dole Cannery Square Oahu 562,000 Bishop Museum Oahu 509,627 Waimea Falls State Park Oahu 458,131 Source: Hawaii Dept. of Business, Economic Development and Tourism.
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