Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUss Posco Industries
IN THE NEWS

Uss Posco Industries

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
May 7, 1989
James Flanigan's column on the new USS-Posco Industries steel plant at Pittsburg, Calif., ("It Took Time, but U.S. Steel Learned Lesson," April 9) was excellent and pointed out some very important issues. But it missed one of the primary causes of the obsolescence of the basic industries of the United States: our tax laws. American industry does not normally get government subsidies, but the fact is that they are subject to reverse subsidies in the form of excessive tax rates. Every time an environmentalist sees what he perceives to be a problem, the legislature is called upon to tax industry to pay for fixing it. When the budget runs at a huge deficit, Congress first thinks of placing a new tax on industry.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 16, 1990 | BOB BAKER, TIMES LABOR WRITER
Wellford Wilms came back to the assembly line the other day, to the spot where he'd put thousands of right rear interior door handles on Toyota Corollas and Geo Prizms. The men and women on the line greeted him warmly with hugs and jokes. It would have made a great beer commercial. Except that Wilms isn't a retired auto worker. He's a prematurely gray professor in UCLA's Graduate School of Education who decided to learn about how a plant works by working there himself.
Advertisement
NEWS
June 16, 1990 | BOB BAKER, TIMES LABOR WRITER
Wellford Wilms came back to the assembly line the other day, to the spot where he'd put thousands of right rear interior door handles on Toyota Corollas and Geo Prizms. The men and women on the line greeted him warmly with hugs and jokes. It would have made a great beer commercial. Except that Wilms isn't a retired auto worker. He's a prematurely gray professor in UCLA's Graduate School of Education who decided to learn about how a plant works by working there himself.
BUSINESS
May 7, 1989
James Flanigan's column on the new USS-Posco Industries steel plant at Pittsburg, Calif., ("It Took Time, but U.S. Steel Learned Lesson," April 9) was excellent and pointed out some very important issues. But it missed one of the primary causes of the obsolescence of the basic industries of the United States: our tax laws. American industry does not normally get government subsidies, but the fact is that they are subject to reverse subsidies in the form of excessive tax rates. Every time an environmentalist sees what he perceives to be a problem, the legislature is called upon to tax industry to pay for fixing it. When the budget runs at a huge deficit, Congress first thinks of placing a new tax on industry.
BUSINESS
April 9, 1989 | JAMES FLANIGAN
In Pittsburg, Calif., last Thursday, the U.S. Steel division of USX Corp. and its partner, Pohang Steel Co. of South Korea, dedicated a parable for our times. With speeches hailing the globalization of industry from USX Chairman David M. Roderick and Pohang managing director Young-soo Han, the joint venture known as USS-Posco Industries launched a refitted steel mill equipped with the very latest in industrial technology. And there was evident pride among the 1,100 U.S. employees who would work the new machines.
NEWS
November 3, 1991 | BOB BAKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Martha Quesada remembers the old days on the General Motors assembly line, when she watched a co-worker suffer a heart attack. "They pulled him out and the line never stopped running," she said. "That shapes your attitude about the place you work. . . . I was a number." These days, the same GM plant in Fremont is jointly owned with Toyota. It's called New United Motor Manufacturing Inc. Quesada is called a "team member" in the assembly maintenance department.
BUSINESS
August 10, 1996 | LESLIE EARNEST, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
At one Orange County construction site, the traditional sounds of home building--hammers thumping on wood--have given way to a more grating noise. The air there rings with what some say are the sounds of the future: screws twisting into metal, saws slicing through steel. Instead of wood frames, the 14 houses on this street will have skeletons of steel. Taylor Woodrow Homes California Ltd. is introducing steel-frame tract housing in Orange County after launching a similar venture in Temecula.
NEWS
September 7, 1990 | BOB BAKER, TIMES LABOR WRITER
Many middle-aged corporate workers who are bored with their jobs have an enduring fantasy. It goes like this: Your employer, burdened by excess manpower, decides to cut costs by offering a company-wide early retirement "incentive" program. The company temporarily liberalizes its pension eligibility rules, raises monthly benefits and throws in months of severance pay. You can quit with a full pension at, say, age 52 instead of 62. Alas, the odds of this prayer being answered are shrinking.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|