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SCIENCE
July 30, 2012
1960 USSR - Marsnik 1: Rocket failed USSR - Marsnik 2: Rocket failed 1962 USSR - Sputnik 22: Exploded in Earth orbit during Cuban missile crisis; debris triggered U.S. early warning radar systems. USSR - Mars 1: Radio failed at 65.9 million miles. USSR - Sputnik 24: Achieved Earth orbit only. 1964 U.S. - Mariner 3: Cover of craft never detached from rocket. U.S. - Mariner 4: First Mars success; returned 21 photos.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SCIENCE
July 30, 2012
1960 USSR - Marsnik 1: Rocket failed USSR - Marsnik 2: Rocket failed 1962 USSR - Sputnik 22: Exploded in Earth orbit during Cuban missile crisis; debris triggered U.S. early warning radar systems. USSR - Mars 1: Radio failed at 65.9 million miles. USSR - Sputnik 24: Achieved Earth orbit only. 1964 U.S. - Mariner 3: Cover of craft never detached from rocket. U.S. - Mariner 4: First Mars success; returned 21 photos.
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SPORTS
November 24, 1987 | United Press International
J.R. Reid and Scott Williams scored 15 points each to lead North Carolina to a 73-71 exhibition victory Monday over the Soviet National Team. The second-ranked Tar Heels are 1-0 after Saturday's victory over Syracuse in the Tip-Off Classic. The Soviets, on a 10-game American tour, are 6-3. They play their final game Tuesday at Kentucky. Sergey Tarakanov led the USSR with 15 points.
NATIONAL
June 8, 2012 | By Richard Simon
WASHINGTON - Fifty-two years after his U-2 spy plane was shot down over the Soviet Union, famed Cold War pilot Francis Gary Powers will be posthumously awarded the Silver Star.  The medal will be presented by Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. Norton Schwartz to Powers' grandson and granddaughter at a Pentagon ceremony attended by other family members next Friday. Powers, who died in 1977 at age 47 in a helicopter crash in Los Angeles, will be recognized for his "indomitable spirit, exceptional loyalty" and "sustained courage in an exceptionally hostile environment," according to the citation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1988
Your article "Four Soviets Bring a Bit of Glasnost to Irvine" (June 3) might have left your readers wondering: How did those Soviets get here? Who brought them? The answer is--I brought them, and my friends and neighbors and other ordinary citizens all over the United States brought them, in an attempt by ordinary people in both of our countries to increase understanding and cooperation between the United States and the Soviet Union. Our President and First Lady demonstrated for the whole world to see that one visit can bring astonishing shifts in attitude.
NEWS
January 4, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
As a rash of anonymous bomb threats plagued authorities in Western Europe, the Soviet Union said Tuesday that it will join the international effort to track down the terrorists who planted an explosive aboard Pan Am Flight 103, killing 270 people. In Lockerbie, Scotland, site of the Dec. 21 crash of the Boeing 747 jumbo jet, investigators continued searching for 20% of the widely-spread wreckage not yet located.
NEWS
December 21, 1991 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Buffeted by drought, wars and political tumult, the world's food production dropped in 1991 for the first time in nearly a decade, accentuating grim prospects of famine in Iraq and the Horn of Africa and severe food shortages in parts of the old Soviet Union and Eastern Europe, U.N. experts report. "The world will enter 1992 once again consuming more than it produces, and stocks will be drawn down to dangerously low levels," Edouard Saouma, director general of the Rome-based U.N.
WORLD
April 6, 2012 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
MOSCOW — Josef Stalin ruled the Soviet Union for three decades, turning it from a backward agrarian country into a nuclear superpower — and a land of mass murder, political repression and gulags. After his communist successors acknowledged the brutality of his reign, Stalin's body was removed from its place of honor in a Red Square mausoleum and buried under the cover of darkness beneath the walls of the Kremlin. The harsher details of that history lesson might be lost on some Russian students, however, now that Stalin's face graces the covers of school notebooks that recently went on sale in Moscow and have become an immediate bestseller.
NEWS
June 3, 1988 | NIKKI FINKE, Times Staff Writer
Look at a group of women walking around Moscow these days and, besides their drawstring bags and sensible shoes, chances are good that they will be wearing the Soviet Union's newest fashion. It's "Raisa Red," the shade of the Soviet first lady's hair color. Appearing softer and lighter in person than it does on television and in newsmagazine photos, Mrs. Gorbachev's coppery gold coif is the height of fashion here.
NEWS
March 22, 2001 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"The ship, a fragment detached from the Earth, went on lonely and swift like a small planet." --Joseph Conrad * For 15 years, it has circled the world, silently keeping aloft the dream that humans will one day colonize the cosmos. Now, as the Mir space station drifts toward its demise tonight--a plummet in a blazing cascade over the southern Pacific Ocean--those who have built and flown the hulking marvel are mourning the passage of one of history's valiant ships.
WORLD
April 6, 2012 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
MOSCOW — Josef Stalin ruled the Soviet Union for three decades, turning it from a backward agrarian country into a nuclear superpower — and a land of mass murder, political repression and gulags. After his communist successors acknowledged the brutality of his reign, Stalin's body was removed from its place of honor in a Red Square mausoleum and buried under the cover of darkness beneath the walls of the Kremlin. The harsher details of that history lesson might be lost on some Russian students, however, now that Stalin's face graces the covers of school notebooks that recently went on sale in Moscow and have become an immediate bestseller.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 2012 | By Paula Woods, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Four years ago, "Child 44," Tom Rob Smith's debut thriller set in Stalinist Russia, was a literary sensation. An edgy, intense portrait of Russia's secret police and the lengths they would go to to protect their country's image as a crime-free society, "Child 44" managed to straddle a fine line between well-researched, absorbing historical fiction and propulsive thriller that would earn the book universal praise, sales of more than 1.5 million copies...
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2011 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
The quietly powerful documentary "My Perestroika" opens with images of uniformed children covering a massive parade ground in Moscow, with one youngster thanking the Soviet leader at the time, Leonid Brezhnev, for their "happy childhood. " As the camera continues to pan across that sea of similarity, we hear a woman's thoughtful ruminations: "I can't say I wanted to be like everyone else, it wasn't that exactly, I simply was like everyone else. " The voice belongs to Lyuba Meyerson, one of five ordinary Russians featured in filmmaker Robin Hessman's compelling portrait of the generation who came of age as the USSR crumbled around them.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2010 | By Mark Olsen, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
It is easy to feel that pop culture is merely a superficial distraction. Yet what if those junky TV shows and trashy stars were actually the leading edge of a revolutionary vanguard, overturning whole systems of government? Such is the idea posited by " Disco and Atomic War," a cheeky, odd little documentary that blends family photos and vintage newsreels with new interviews and re-created scenes to tell a story that is at once extremely personal and sweepingly broad. When he was growing up in Estonia, then part of the Soviet Union, director Jaak Kilmi would take pictures of his television set. It was the most interesting thing he knew.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 2009 | Randy Lewis
Within the confines of his Corona work space, guitar designer Yuriy Shishkov had transformed a plank of blond ash wood into the body of a new Fender Telecaster. Seated at his bench, where he spends hours every day creating one-of-a-kind hand-crafted instruments, he studied the nascent creation.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2008 | Olga Bondaruk, Associated Press
KIEV, Ukraine -- Tens of thousands of people braved heavy rain and thunder Saturday night to see Paul McCartney perform a charity concert on Kiev's central Independence Square. The outdoor show, the first in Ukraine for the ex-Beatle, was billed as the biggest concert ever in the former Soviet republic. It was broadcast live on national television and on giant screens in five cities.
BUSINESS
June 29, 1990 | From Associated Press
East Bloc consumers recognize a wide range of Western brand names even though many of the products have not been actively marketed or may not be available in their countries, a survey says. But many U.S. brands ranked much lower on quality than on name recognition, raising disturbing questions for American exporters. The lagging quality perception could give Japanese and Western European competitors an advantage.
BOOKS
August 20, 2006 | Michael Sims, Michael Sims is the author of "Adam's Navel" and editor of "The Annotated Archy and Mehitabel."
THE Serbian writer Danilo Kis once described the unique tone of Central European literature in the mid- and later 20th century as "ironic lyricism," but the writings of Mikhail Zoshchenko suggest that this literary alloy was being produced even earlier and farther east. In 1930, Maxim Gorky wrote to Zoshchenko, "You have all the qualities of a satirist, a very acute sense of irony accompanied by lyricism in an extremely original way.
WORLD
March 3, 2006 | Tracy Wilkinson, Times Staff Writer
It has persisted as one of the most mysterious cases of international intrigue in recent times: Who shot the pope? A committee of Italy's Parliament investigating the 1981 attempt to assassinate John Paul II released its conclusion Thursday that "beyond any reasonable doubt" the Soviet Union ordered the attack that seriously wounded the pope as he greeted crowds in St. Peter's Square. The Turkish gunman, Mehmet Ali Agca, was long ago condemned in the shooting and served 19 years in jail.
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