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NEWS
March 7, 1990 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
In the first substantive Democratic response to the upheaval in Eastern Europe, House Majority Leader Richard A. Gephardt on Tuesday outlined a broad program for U.S. assistance to the emerging democracies in what used to be the Soviet orbit and to the Soviet Union itself.
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NEWS
December 7, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With protesters picketing City Hall to demand better food supplies and increasing reports of raids by hungry urbanites on farm stocks, Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev appealed to leaders of four fertile republics on Friday to help feed the 9 million residents of Moscow.
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NEWS
October 22, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although President Mikhail S. Gorbachev has won his mandate to develop a market economy, bringing some of the most fundamental changes in Soviet history, he now faces a major struggle over the shape of that transformation.
NEWS
October 25, 1991 | DOUGLAS JEHL and JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush is expected to sign off on a new, $1.25-billion package of humanitarian assistance for the Soviet Union, which he plans to announce next week during talks with Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev in Madrid, according to senior officials. But the Administration has not decided how to respond to a Gorbachev request for a further $3.5 billion in direct economic aid and continues to debate whether U.S.
BUSINESS
July 12, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Soviets Will Have to Import More Grain: Poor growing conditions have trimmed the Soviet Union's harvest prospects this year and will force Moscow to import more than had been expected, the Agriculture Department report said. Grain output was forecast at 205 million metric tons, down 5 million from forecasts in June and far below the near-record output of 235 million tons last year.
NEWS
October 4, 1991 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In just a few weeks, Boris Teselkin, a soft-spoken captain in the Red Army's Taman Division, has gone from protecting a Russian president--and helping to make history--to pulling up cabbages from the mud. But for Teselkin and thousands of his military colleagues, putting food on the Russian table this winter may now be just as important to their nation's future as protecting the life of Boris N. Yeltsin.
NEWS
October 12, 1991 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Beneath a portrait of Soviet founder V. I. Lenin, in a dusty auditorium in the headquarters of the Ukrainian Agriculture Ministry, U.S. Agriculture Secretary Edward R. Madigan last Monday lectured a roomful of Ukrainian government officials--mostly former Communists--on the joys of capitalism and free-market farming. "We will help you, but the key to your reform is the development of markets and the liberalization of prices," Madigan told them.
NEWS
April 5, 1988 | From Reuters
More than 10 million Soviet peasants were persecuted under Josef Stalin's farm collectivization drive in the early 1930s, according to a member of the Soviet Academy of Agricultural Sciences. The figure, cited by academician Vladimir A. Tikhonov in the weekly Argumenty Fakty, was believed to be the highest published estimate in the Soviet Union of the toll of Stalin's forced collectivization of farmers.
NEWS
November 15, 1988
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev summoned top Communist Party and government officials to the provincial town of Orel, 230 miles south of Moscow, and told them his reforms will fail unless consumers get better food supplies. The meeting underlined the importance of the issue as well as the success of the Orel area in improving its farm output. "We don't need just words on this theme, there have been a lot of words spoken already," Gorbachev said in remarks carried by the Tass news agency.
BUSINESS
November 26, 1988 | From Reuters
U.S. and Soviet negotiators will meet for another round of grain trade talks in Moscow on Monday and hope to complete a new pact on Soviet purchases by the end of the week, U.S. sources in the Soviet capital said Friday. "We hope that something will be signed, but we can't say for sure," a U.S. official said. Earlier talks in London this fall stalled when the Soviet side refused to agree to buy as much grain as the U.S. side demanded.
NEWS
October 12, 1991 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Beneath a portrait of Soviet founder V. I. Lenin, in a dusty auditorium in the headquarters of the Ukrainian Agriculture Ministry, U.S. Agriculture Secretary Edward R. Madigan last Monday lectured a roomful of Ukrainian government officials--mostly former Communists--on the joys of capitalism and free-market farming. "We will help you, but the key to your reform is the development of markets and the liberalization of prices," Madigan told them.
NEWS
October 12, 1991 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Winter has come to Siberia. The last wheat has been laboriously gathered, and the potatoes have been scraped from the unyielding earth by hand. The first snow has dusted the landscape. Vast piles of freshly chopped firewood stand next to log cabins in readiness for the numbing cold about to descend. It's time to start eating the horses.
NEWS
October 10, 1991 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With food lines lengthening in major Soviet cities and winter fast approaching, Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev formally presented a detailed request to the United States for emergency food assistance in a Kremlin meeting Wednesday with U.S. Agriculture Secretary Edward R. Madigan. The details of Gorbachev's request were not disclosed, but U.S. officials said it includes specific dollar figures and tonnage amounts for each type of food the Soviets want from the West.
NEWS
October 5, 1991 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Half a mile down a winding dirt road in the foothills of the Caucasus Mountains, past quacking clusters of ducks, past the pigpen and stray cows, just past the thatched-roofed hut, Nikolai Petrovsky is trying to be a farmer. But with shortages of fuel and equipment--not to mention the frosty attitude of local authorities--each day is a grueling contest with time and nature.
NEWS
October 4, 1991 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In just a few weeks, Boris Teselkin, a soft-spoken captain in the Red Army's Taman Division, has gone from protecting a Russian president--and helping to make history--to pulling up cabbages from the mud. But for Teselkin and thousands of his military colleagues, putting food on the Russian table this winter may now be just as important to their nation's future as protecting the life of Boris N. Yeltsin.
NEWS
October 3, 1991 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Illinois corn farmer Maury Gordon came to the Gorky Collective Farm, 30 miles outside Moscow, on Wednesday looking for answers. He didn't get any good ones from the collective's manager, Vasily Momrov. So, like a stubborn detective searching for clues, Gordon lit out on his own, stomping through muddy fields and barns, talking to milkmaids and livestock tenders, probing one of the biggest mysteries in the Soviet Union: Why is this country's agricultural system so messed up?
NEWS
October 14, 1988 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, in a speech broadcast Thursday, outlined far-reaching changes in the country's agricultural policy as a first step toward broader economic reforms. Breaking with more than 50 years of Soviet socialism, Gorbachev described the changes, including a return to family farming and other individual enterprises, as "a colossal turn" for the Soviet Union.
NEWS
September 23, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet Union's dramatic economic free fall is continuing at a rate that economists fear will bring widespread social unrest and new political upheavals despite the defeat of conservatives in last month's abortive coup d'etat. Inflation is now running at nearly 300% a year. Industrial production has dropped 14% compared to a year ago, foreign trade is down 30% and the overall economy is shrinking at an annual rate of 12% to 15%, according to government figures.
BUSINESS
August 29, 1991 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Harried Bush Administration officials, pondering how to react to the most dramatic foreign crisis in a generation, quickly realized that they have only three available policy options--wheat, corn and soybeans. Largely by default, agriculture has become America's No. 1 foreign policy tool in dealing with the Soviet Union. Although some U.S.
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