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NEWS
September 21, 1988
About 400,000 people jammed the main square of Yerevan, the capital of Soviet Armenia, and heard renewed demands for annexation of Nagorno-Karabakh, a predominantly Christian Armenian enclave in the mainly Muslim republic of Azerbaijan, activists reported. Rafael Popoyan, one of the activists, said many residents in the capital who struck last Friday remained off the job, vowing to stay away until the Armenian Parliament meets in a new session to reconsider their plea to annex the region.
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NEWS
September 5, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev is ready to sign a decree at the end of this week that will recognize the independence of the Baltic states of Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania, the Kremlin told Baltic officials Wednesday. The presidential decree, as provided to Baltic officials, would declare invalid the Soviet Union's annexation of the three states in 1940 under a pact with Nazi Germany; its legal effect would be to restore their independence.
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NEWS
January 11, 1989
About 50,000 people in Vilnius freely protested the Hitler-Stalin pact, which led to Soviet annexation of Lithuania, Estonia and Latvia, activists reported from the Lithuanian capital. Twenty speakers demanded Lithuanian independence and withdrawal of "the Soviet occupation army," calling the 1939 pact a "shameful lie," journalist Valdas Analauskas said in a telephone call to Moscow. The Baltic nations were independent from the end of World War I until Soviet annexation in 1940.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 1990 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the aged bus rumbled along the road from Vilnius to Kaunas in Lithuania, Rep. C. Christopher Cox huddled at a makeshift table with the three men who are likely to draft a new constitution for an independent Lithuania. The Newport Beach Republican handed out copies of the U.S. Constitution, the Declaration of Independence and the Federalist Papers.
NEWS
June 22, 1988
The legislature in Nagorno-Karabakh, an enclave within the Azerbaijan Soviet republic, appealed to the national government that the territory be made independent until Moscow decides whether it belongs to Soviet Armenia or Azerbaijan, an Armenian activist said in Moscow. Koryun Nahabidyan said he spoke to Nagorno-Karabakh residents familiar with the decision. Azerbaijan has refused to give up the territory, and Moscow has not said when it will decide the question.
NEWS
August 24, 1988 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
Nationalists from the Soviet Baltic republics of Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania, on the 49th anniversary of Moscow's still-controversial pact with Nazi Germany, Tuesday fiercely debated the resulting incorporation of the three states into the Soviet Union. The official Soviet news agency Tass reported that about 100,000 people took part in the largest rally, in the Lithuanian capital of Vilnius, followed by candlelight processions through the city.
NEWS
September 5, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev is ready to sign a decree at the end of this week that will recognize the independence of the Baltic states of Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania, the Kremlin told Baltic officials Wednesday. The presidential decree, as provided to Baltic officials, would declare invalid the Soviet Union's annexation of the three states in 1940 under a pact with Nazi Germany; its legal effect would be to restore their independence.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 1990 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the aged bus rumbled along the road from Vilnius to Kaunas in Lithuania, Rep. C. Christopher Cox huddled at a makeshift table with the three men who are likely to draft a new constitution for an independent Lithuania. The Newport Beach Republican handed out copies of the U.S. Constitution, the Declaration of Independence and the Federalist Papers.
NEWS
May 20, 1988 | RONE TEMPEST, Times Staff Writer
On the map, the muddy Amu Darya River forms part of the frontier between Afghanistan and the Soviet Union, but Soviet soldiers are posted at both ends of the bridges that span the river. The local people, mostly Uzbeks, Tadzhiks and Turkmen, are largely the same on both banks of the river. The question of nationality is hazy, practically irrelevant. Signs on many of the shops here in Mazar-i-Sharif, as in other towns in the area, are in Russian as well as in Afghan Persian.
NEWS
January 11, 1989
About 50,000 people in Vilnius freely protested the Hitler-Stalin pact, which led to Soviet annexation of Lithuania, Estonia and Latvia, activists reported from the Lithuanian capital. Twenty speakers demanded Lithuanian independence and withdrawal of "the Soviet occupation army," calling the 1939 pact a "shameful lie," journalist Valdas Analauskas said in a telephone call to Moscow. The Baltic nations were independent from the end of World War I until Soviet annexation in 1940.
NEWS
September 21, 1988
About 400,000 people jammed the main square of Yerevan, the capital of Soviet Armenia, and heard renewed demands for annexation of Nagorno-Karabakh, a predominantly Christian Armenian enclave in the mainly Muslim republic of Azerbaijan, activists reported. Rafael Popoyan, one of the activists, said many residents in the capital who struck last Friday remained off the job, vowing to stay away until the Armenian Parliament meets in a new session to reconsider their plea to annex the region.
NEWS
August 24, 1988 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
Nationalists from the Soviet Baltic republics of Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania, on the 49th anniversary of Moscow's still-controversial pact with Nazi Germany, Tuesday fiercely debated the resulting incorporation of the three states into the Soviet Union. The official Soviet news agency Tass reported that about 100,000 people took part in the largest rally, in the Lithuanian capital of Vilnius, followed by candlelight processions through the city.
NEWS
June 22, 1988
The legislature in Nagorno-Karabakh, an enclave within the Azerbaijan Soviet republic, appealed to the national government that the territory be made independent until Moscow decides whether it belongs to Soviet Armenia or Azerbaijan, an Armenian activist said in Moscow. Koryun Nahabidyan said he spoke to Nagorno-Karabakh residents familiar with the decision. Azerbaijan has refused to give up the territory, and Moscow has not said when it will decide the question.
NEWS
May 20, 1988 | RONE TEMPEST, Times Staff Writer
On the map, the muddy Amu Darya River forms part of the frontier between Afghanistan and the Soviet Union, but Soviet soldiers are posted at both ends of the bridges that span the river. The local people, mostly Uzbeks, Tadzhiks and Turkmen, are largely the same on both banks of the river. The question of nationality is hazy, practically irrelevant. Signs on many of the shops here in Mazar-i-Sharif, as in other towns in the area, are in Russian as well as in Afghan Persian.
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