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NEWS
October 1, 1988 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
At 7:59 p.m. on Aug. 4, thousands of feet above one of the world's most rugged borders, a Pakistani air force F-16 fighter plane opened fire on a Soviet SU-25 fighter-bomber that had penetrated Pakistani airspace. The encounter was brief: A single missile from the F-16 scored a direct hit. The Soviet plane, which Pakistan alleges was carrying cluster bombs meant for Pakistani villagers, crashed 15 miles inside Pakistan. The pilot, Col. Alexander V.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 2000 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wearing rows of aging medals on weary chests, hundreds of old soldiers from the Soviet army marched once more Tuesday--this time to a park in West Hollywood where they celebrated the end of World War II. It was a bittersweet reunion for veterans of the Red army who suffered mightily to beat back Nazi Germany's invasion of the Soviet Union, only to see it replaced with Cold War oppression that drove them from their homeland.
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NEWS
July 5, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
A Soviet jet fighter flew over three NATO nations Tuesday, after its pilot ejected over Poland, and crashed into a house near the French-Belgian border, killing a teen-ager inside. Officials of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, headquartered in Brussels, said U.S. F-15s intercepted the MIG-23 soon after it entered NATO airspace and accompanied it until it crashed. They said the Soviet plane was carrying only conventional weapons.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1997 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Yvenalia Rosenman stood straight and solemn under a near-summer sun that warmed his body as much as his passion for his native Ukraine. Waving 76-year-old hands still as steady as a young marksman's, he talked about a soldier's bittersweet pride, about his Red Army uniform festooned with medals garnered in the Second World War. "I earned this uniform," he said through a Russian translator, his voice shaking. "The things I saw, the friends I lost. I'm not ashamed to wear it.
NEWS
April 8, 1989 | JOHN M. BRODER and MELISSA HEALY, Times Staff Writers
An advanced Soviet attack submarine caught fire and sank in the Norwegian Sea on Friday, U.S. and Norwegian government sources reported. A Soviet official in Oslo confirmed that it had sunk. The nuclear-powered Mike-class submarine, which can carry a crew of 95, suffered a catastrophic accident involving "major loss of life," one U.S. government official said. An American monitoring reports on the incident said the vessel surfaced briefly, then sank.
NEWS
January 31, 1989 | DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writer
In a move that Western analysts here said has more political than practical importance, the Soviet-led Warsaw Pact nations published Monday for the first time detailed data on their military forces in Europe and their estimates of NATO forces. East Bloc defense ministers said in an accompanying statement that the data shows "rough parity" between the two sides.
NEWS
February 5, 1990 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seeking further savings from the declining Soviet threat, Democratic House and Senate leaders said Sunday that U.S. troop levels in Central Europe should be cut to about 100,000 within a few years, or roughly half the level proposed last week by President Bush. But the suggestion by House Speaker Thomas S. Foley (D-Wash.) and Senate Majority Leader George J. Mitchell (D-Me.) drew immediate fire from President Bush's chief of staff, John H.
NEWS
July 7, 1989 | MASHA HAMILTON, Times Staff Writer
In remarkably candid comments, a senior officer of the Soviet air force said Thursday that he was disappointed by the inability of Warsaw Pact air commanders to identify and stop a pilotless Soviet MIG-23 before it crossed four international borders and crashed into a house in Belgium, killing one man. Lt. Gen. Yevgeny I.
NEWS
January 18, 1990 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration said Wednesday that it does not support demands for an independent Azerbaijan and reaffirmed U.S. backing for Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev in his efforts to halt fighting between Azerbaijanis and Armenians. State Department spokeswoman Margaret Tutwiler, asked whether the Administration favors independence for the Azerbaijan republic, told reporters: "Since 1933, we have recognized the territorial integrity of the Soviet Union."
NEWS
December 16, 1989 | From Reuters
The Soviet Union said Friday that it will reduce its military spending by more than 8% next year, and gave the most detailed description to date of its armed forces. Col. Gen. Nikolai Chervov told a news conference that cutting the military budget 8.2%, to $115 billion, was part of a program of shifting Soviet armed forces from an offensive posture to a more defensive role. As of January, 1990, Soviet military forces will number 3,993,000, he said.
NEWS
January 6, 1995 | PAVEL FELGENHAUER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Pavel Felgenhauer, a military history specialist, is defense and national security editor of the Moscow newspaper Sevodnya
For nearly half a century, the West waited with dread for an onslaught of Russian tank divisions into Europe. Today, after the beating the Russians took in an abortive New Year's tank assault on the capital of tiny breakaway Chechnya, that dread has been replaced by puzzlement: What happened to the great and terrible Red Army? No one anticipated that the Russians would fight so poorly against Chechen President Dzhokar M.
NEWS
August 29, 1993 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1954, the Soviet army exploded a nuclear bomb over Yuri D. Sorokin's head. The 68-year-old veteran said he is among the last survivors of the 44,000 Soviet troops who were massed on the plain in Russia's southern Urals on Sept. 13, 1954, to take part in a giant war game featuring a real atomic bomb. Sorokin, who was an intelligence officer, said he and his troops were marched through the epicenter six hours after the blast, with no protection from the radiation.
NEWS
July 20, 1993 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER; Sergei L. Loiko and Andrei V. Ostroukh of The Times' Moscow Bureau contributed to this report
One daily drill of soldiers in the new Georgian army is to launch rockets across the Gumista River at a three-story building by the Black Sea. Their aim is lousy, but after months of occasional hits, the windows are gone and the concrete walls look like Swiss cheese. Still, the strategic value of the site is intact--a deep underground seismic laboratory used by Russia's army to detect nuclear explosions in Southern Europe, the Middle East and Africa.
NEWS
April 25, 1992 | From Reuters
The 3.7-million-member former Soviet armed forces were condemned Friday as a breeding ground for bullies who killed tens of thousands of recruits. One of the world's biggest military powers was a leader in brutality to draftees, said Anatoly Alekseyev, head of a Russian presidential panel on troops and their families. The armed forces lost far more young recruits in barracks violence and torture than they did in combat against Afghan guerrillas, he said.
MAGAZINE
April 12, 1992 | Kathleen Hunt, Kathleen Hunt is a Moscow correspondent for National Public Radio. Her work has appeared in the New Yorker and the New York Times Magazine
IN A CRAMPED AUTOPSY ROOM IN MOSCOW, with bulky, antiquated equipment, a scruffy workman with a hammer and chisel tears open a soldered zinc box to reveal a slender coffin covered with thin red cotton. With the stench of putrefying flesh rushing in each time the door to the morgue flies open, the workman and a helper raise the coffin lid. The bruised and strangled body of a tall, 19-year-old sailor from the Vladivostok fleet lies crammed into the box.
NEWS
March 30, 1992 | TAMARA JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One afternoon last month, the Red Army cordially invited the international media to observe what was being billed as a historic occasion: the first withdrawal of former Soviet troops from this newly independent Baltic nation after 50 years of occupation. The gates of the army compound just outside Vilnius were flung open, and seven massive trucks bearing surface-to-air missiles revved their engines.
NEWS
December 2, 1989 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As hard-line communism in Czechoslovakia went into its death throes last week, an eerie quiet fell over Mlada Boleslav, an industrial town just northeast of Prague. Soviet troops, stationed here since 1968, simply disappeared. "They went inside and stayed there for days," Oldrich Kubala, an editor at the regional newspaper Zar (Light), told a visitor.
NEWS
August 18, 1988 | Times Wire Services
Muslim rebels destroyed a major Soviet arms depot in northern Afghanistan in a rocket attack that left as many as 109 dead, a Western diplomat based in Kabul said Wednesday. The diplomat quoted "multiple Afghan sources" as saying 109 Soviet troops died in the Aug. 10 blast caused by two rockets hitting the facility at Kalagay, about 100 miles north of the capital.
SPORTS
March 7, 1992
Viacheslav Kozlov has been cleared by a Circuit Court judge in Wayne County, Mich., to join the Detroit Red Wings, despite a contract with the former Soviet Red Army team. Judge Sharon Tevis Finch, citing lack of evidence to the contrary, agreed with Kozlov's assertion that he signed the contract with the Soviet club under duress.
NEWS
February 21, 1992 | MARY MYCIO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One of the two largest aircraft carriers ever designed by the mighty Soviet military is being put on the auction block. For a mere $100 million down--the balance is negotiable--an aspiring naval power can buy the Varyag, now under construction, a ship the Pentagon has described as "a dramatic leap forward in technical fleet air defense capability."
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