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NEWS
September 28, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III and Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze said Thursday that they are near agreement on a treaty limiting conventional arms in Europe, apparently clearing the way for a summit meeting of European and North American leaders in Paris in November. "We have made real headway," Shevardnadze said after a two-hour meeting in Baker's Waldorf Astoria Hotel suite. Baker agreed, saying, "We made some good progress."
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NEWS
August 20, 1991
The hard-liners who seized power in the Kremlin have long lamented the Soviets' losing control of Eastern Europe. But whether a Soviet invasion is likely remains open to question. Soviet troops have withdrawn or are in process of withdrawing from Eastern European nations, which would make it difficult to launch a military operation.
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NEWS
February 13, 1991 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States signaled the Soviet Union Tuesday that negotiations on troop ceilings in Europe are jeopardized by Moscow's interpretation of how the Conventional Forces in Europe treaty cuts the numbers of weapons such as tanks. The new talks, aimed at reducing manpower in line with the treaty's weapons cuts, will begin today in Vienna as scheduled, according to State Department spokeswoman Margaret Tutwiler.
NEWS
August 20, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Scenes of tanks thundering through Moscow after the fall of Mikhail S. Gorbachev and his age of reform have sent an unseasonable chill through Eastern Europe, where past victims of Stalinist aggression fear they are once again at the mercy of the Communist giant to the east.
NEWS
January 11, 1989
The Soviet Union will begin withdrawing some of its troops from Hungary within a few weeks, apparently as part of the Kremlin's plan to reduce its forces in Eastern Europe, Hungarian Communist Party leader Karoly Grosz said in an interview. "The partial withdrawal of Soviet troops from Hungarian territory is to commence within weeks," the Hungarian news agency MTI quoted Grosz as saying in an interview with a leading Japanese economic newspaper, Nihon Keizai Shimbun. Soviet President Mikhail S.
NEWS
August 20, 1991
The hard-liners who seized power in the Kremlin have long lamented the Soviets' losing control of Eastern Europe. But whether a Soviet invasion is likely remains open to question. Soviet troops have withdrawn or are in process of withdrawing from Eastern European nations, which would make it difficult to launch a military operation.
NEWS
September 7, 1990 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S.-Soviet plan to complete the treaty slashing the superpowers' conventional forces in Europe by the end of the year is being jeopardized almost at the last minute by concerns in Moscow over the rapid changes in Eastern Europe and the massive American military buildup in the Persian Gulf.
NEWS
February 12, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet Union, declaring the Cold War over, on Sunday stated its readiness to withdraw all of its troops from Central Europe, many of them unilaterally, in an effort to accelerate the negotiations now under way on reducing conventional forces in Europe.
NEWS
August 20, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Scenes of tanks thundering through Moscow after the fall of Mikhail S. Gorbachev and his age of reform have sent an unseasonable chill through Eastern Europe, where past victims of Stalinist aggression fear they are once again at the mercy of the Communist giant to the east.
NEWS
February 4, 1991 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The former Communist Party official was blunt and grave about his fears: "All signs point to a strong military dictatorship emerging in the Soviet Union," he said. "Not only is Hungary afraid of this, but all the other countries of this region are afraid of this as well." A politician in Budapest agreed.
NEWS
February 13, 1991 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States signaled the Soviet Union Tuesday that negotiations on troop ceilings in Europe are jeopardized by Moscow's interpretation of how the Conventional Forces in Europe treaty cuts the numbers of weapons such as tanks. The new talks, aimed at reducing manpower in line with the treaty's weapons cuts, will begin today in Vienna as scheduled, according to State Department spokeswoman Margaret Tutwiler.
NEWS
February 4, 1991 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The former Communist Party official was blunt and grave about his fears: "All signs point to a strong military dictatorship emerging in the Soviet Union," he said. "Not only is Hungary afraid of this, but all the other countries of this region are afraid of this as well." A politician in Budapest agreed.
NEWS
September 28, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III and Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze said Thursday that they are near agreement on a treaty limiting conventional arms in Europe, apparently clearing the way for a summit meeting of European and North American leaders in Paris in November. "We have made real headway," Shevardnadze said after a two-hour meeting in Baker's Waldorf Astoria Hotel suite. Baker agreed, saying, "We made some good progress."
NEWS
September 7, 1990 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S.-Soviet plan to complete the treaty slashing the superpowers' conventional forces in Europe by the end of the year is being jeopardized almost at the last minute by concerns in Moscow over the rapid changes in Eastern Europe and the massive American military buildup in the Persian Gulf.
NEWS
February 27, 1990 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A phased withdrawal of Soviet troops from Czechoslovakia began Monday as President Vaclav Havel witnessed in Moscow the signing of an agreement that calls for the removal of all 73,500 Soviet troops from Czechoslovakia by July 1, 1991. The Soviet pullout began with little fanfare and a striking lack of emotion on the part of Czechoslovaks, although they have been reluctant hosts to the troops since August, 1968, when Soviet tanks led a Warsaw Pact invasion to crush the Prague Spring reforms.
NEWS
February 12, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet Union, declaring the Cold War over, on Sunday stated its readiness to withdraw all of its troops from Central Europe, many of them unilaterally, in an effort to accelerate the negotiations now under way on reducing conventional forces in Europe.
NEWS
February 27, 1990 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A phased withdrawal of Soviet troops from Czechoslovakia began Monday as President Vaclav Havel witnessed in Moscow the signing of an agreement that calls for the removal of all 73,500 Soviet troops from Czechoslovakia by July 1, 1991. The Soviet pullout began with little fanfare and a striking lack of emotion on the part of Czechoslovaks, although they have been reluctant hosts to the troops since August, 1968, when Soviet tanks led a Warsaw Pact invasion to crush the Prague Spring reforms.
NEWS
January 11, 1989
The Soviet Union will begin withdrawing some of its troops from Hungary within a few weeks, apparently as part of the Kremlin's plan to reduce its forces in Eastern Europe, Hungarian Communist Party leader Karoly Grosz said in an interview. "The partial withdrawal of Soviet troops from Hungarian territory is to commence within weeks," the Hungarian news agency MTI quoted Grosz as saying in an interview with a leading Japanese economic newspaper, Nihon Keizai Shimbun. Soviet President Mikhail S.
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