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NEWS
February 13, 1990 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush said Monday he will not revise his formula for a joint U.S.-Soviet military reduction in Europe even though the Soviets have rejected the idea because it would leave U.S. forces with an additional 30,000 troops. Pointing to the geographical advantage the Soviet Union would have in redeploying units to Central and Eastern Europe west of Soviet borders, Bush said that "we've got a big ocean between us and . . . Western Europe" that would delay a speedy redeployment.
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NEWS
May 28, 1991 | From Reuters
U.S. Defense Secretary Dick Cheney on Monday attacked what he called Soviet intransigence over a treaty reducing conventional forces in Europe, hinting that it could jeopardize a planned superpower summit. Cheney told French television during a visit to Paris that "there is a whole series of problems still to be solved" on the conventional forces in Europe and strategic arms reduction treaties under discussion between the United States and the Soviet Union.
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NEWS
November 9, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush's announcement Thursday that he is sending nearly a quarter million more troops to the Persian Gulf reflects the military payoff for the end of the Cold War and 18 months of massive change in the international balance of power. No longer needed to stand guard against the Soviet Union in Europe, an entire Army corps--about 110,000 soldiers--will be moved from Germany to Saudi Arabia, cutting U.S. armed forces in Europe in half.
NEWS
May 12, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN and DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev told President Bush on Saturday that the arms control disagreements that have delayed a superpower summit can be easily solved so the two leaders can meet soon in Moscow, the official news agency Tass reported. In an extended telephone conversation, Gorbachev said his commitment to U.S.-Soviet relations is as "unchangeable as his choice for a fundamental democratic transformation of the Soviet state," Tass said.
NEWS
October 3, 1990 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. and Soviet arms negotiators meeting in New York have reached agreement on virtually all outstanding issues on slashing conventional forces in Europe, from the Atlantic to the Ural Mountains, U.S. officials said Tuesday. The settlement opens the way for the Europe-wide summit Nov. 19-21 to sign a treaty that will essentially codify the new post-Cold War political shape of the Continent.
NEWS
September 2, 1990 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
About 24 hours before the announcement of next Sunday's U.S.-Soviet summit, a reporter asked Mikhail S. Gorbachev about his travel plans. "I will limit my trips abroad to the minimum in this period--to the possible minimum," the Soviet president replied after two days of meetings on how to salvage the economy.
NEWS
September 11, 1990 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III declared Monday that the landmark U.S.-Soviet agreement on troop ceilings in Europe, reached only seven months ago, has been "overtaken by events" and that the future level of U.S. forces on the Continent is "very much in the air." Baker's statement confirmed that the issue of East-West forces levels was not resolved at the Helsinki summit Sunday. It will be taken up by Baker, who was in Brussels on Monday, during a visit to Moscow this week.
NEWS
May 12, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN and DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev told President Bush on Saturday that the arms control disagreements that have delayed a superpower summit can be easily solved so the two leaders can meet soon in Moscow, the official news agency Tass reported. In an extended telephone conversation, Gorbachev said his commitment to U.S.-Soviet relations is as "unchangeable as his choice for a fundamental democratic transformation of the Soviet state," Tass said.
NEWS
May 28, 1991 | From Reuters
U.S. Defense Secretary Dick Cheney on Monday attacked what he called Soviet intransigence over a treaty reducing conventional forces in Europe, hinting that it could jeopardize a planned superpower summit. Cheney told French television during a visit to Paris that "there is a whole series of problems still to be solved" on the conventional forces in Europe and strategic arms reduction treaties under discussion between the United States and the Soviet Union.
NEWS
May 23, 1990 | DOYLE McMANUS and ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Soviet Union's virtual freeze on negotiations toward a landmark treaty to reduce conventional armed forces in Europe raises serious doubts that the agreement can be concluded on schedule this year, U.S. officials said Tuesday. In recent weeks, Soviet diplomats at the talks on non-nuclear forces in Vienna have politely refused to discuss possible compromises on major issues, Western negotiators said. And last week, when Secretary of State James A.
NEWS
November 9, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush's announcement Thursday that he is sending nearly a quarter million more troops to the Persian Gulf reflects the military payoff for the end of the Cold War and 18 months of massive change in the international balance of power. No longer needed to stand guard against the Soviet Union in Europe, an entire Army corps--about 110,000 soldiers--will be moved from Germany to Saudi Arabia, cutting U.S. armed forces in Europe in half.
NEWS
October 3, 1990 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. and Soviet arms negotiators meeting in New York have reached agreement on virtually all outstanding issues on slashing conventional forces in Europe, from the Atlantic to the Ural Mountains, U.S. officials said Tuesday. The settlement opens the way for the Europe-wide summit Nov. 19-21 to sign a treaty that will essentially codify the new post-Cold War political shape of the Continent.
NEWS
September 14, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although President Bush and Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev have vowed to complete two major arms control agreements this year, the pace of negotiations appears to have stalled. Secretary of State James A. Baker III met for an hour with Gorbachev and for two hours with Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze on Thursday without coming to grips with either strategic arms reduction or conventional forces in Europe.
NEWS
September 11, 1990 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III declared Monday that the landmark U.S.-Soviet agreement on troop ceilings in Europe, reached only seven months ago, has been "overtaken by events" and that the future level of U.S. forces on the Continent is "very much in the air." Baker's statement confirmed that the issue of East-West forces levels was not resolved at the Helsinki summit Sunday. It will be taken up by Baker, who was in Brussels on Monday, during a visit to Moscow this week.
NEWS
September 2, 1990 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
About 24 hours before the announcement of next Sunday's U.S.-Soviet summit, a reporter asked Mikhail S. Gorbachev about his travel plans. "I will limit my trips abroad to the minimum in this period--to the possible minimum," the Soviet president replied after two days of meetings on how to salvage the economy.
NEWS
May 30, 1990 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first signs of a break in the East-West impasse on reducing conventional forces in Europe have come in "constructive responses" by Soviet arms negotiator Viktor P. Karpov to earlier U.S. suggestions, State Department officials said Tuesday. The progress toward eliminating obstacles to an agreement in the so-called CFE talks, coming on the eve of Soviet President Mikhail S.
NEWS
November 26, 1989 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even though arms control is not formally on the Malta summit agenda, some Bush Administration officials expect Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev to make new offers to speed up the negotiations now under way on reducing long-range nuclear arms and non-nuclear weapons in Europe. But for Gorbachev, there is a significant risk, these officials say. Any such dramatic move could trigger a negative reaction from President Bush.
NEWS
February 14, 1990 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a dramatic and surprising concession, the Soviet Union on Tuesday accepted the U.S.-proposed ceiling for troop levels in Europe less than a week after it had indicated opposition to the numbers. The Soviet change of heart means that a treaty on conventional forces in Europe would allow the United States to keep 30,000 more troops there than the Soviet Union would have based in Warsaw Pact countries.
NEWS
May 23, 1990 | DOYLE McMANUS and ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Soviet Union's virtual freeze on negotiations toward a landmark treaty to reduce conventional armed forces in Europe raises serious doubts that the agreement can be concluded on schedule this year, U.S. officials said Tuesday. In recent weeks, Soviet diplomats at the talks on non-nuclear forces in Vienna have politely refused to discuss possible compromises on major issues, Western negotiators said. And last week, when Secretary of State James A.
NEWS
February 14, 1990 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a dramatic and surprising concession, the Soviet Union on Tuesday accepted the U.S.-proposed ceiling for troop levels in Europe less than a week after it had indicated opposition to the numbers. The Soviet change of heart means that a treaty on conventional forces in Europe would allow the United States to keep 30,000 more troops there than the Soviet Union would have based in Warsaw Pact countries.
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