Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUssr Arms Sales
IN THE NEWS

Ussr Arms Sales

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 10, 1988
Worldwide arms sales may have peaked, according to figures released by the U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, but the new pattern of the weapons market shows some new and energetic players, including China, Brazil and Israel. The annual report on world military expenditures and arms transfers showed a sharp drop in 1985 and 1986, the most recent years available, from 1984. The world total of arms imports in 1984 was about $50 billion, the report said. By 1986 it had dropped to $34.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 4, 1994 | From a Times Staff Writer
Secretary of State Warren Christopher has decided to block the importation of as many as 7.6 million handguns and rifles from the former Soviet Union, the State Department said Monday. Christopher also ordered a study to determine why so many Russian guns are appearing on the world market and recommend what U.S. policy should be, spokesman Mike McCurry said.
Advertisement
NEWS
May 25, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Global military spending and arms trading fell significantly in 1990 despite the buildup to the Gulf War, and the United States replaced the Soviet Union as the main exporter, taking 40% of the market, the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute said in its 1991 yearbook. Total world military spending fell in real terms by 5% to $950 billion in 1990, compared with a 2% decline in 1989, the institute said. Global trade in conventional arms fell 35%.
NEWS
December 14, 1991 | JOHN M. BRODER and DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The United States, expressing concern that Soviet nuclear weapons could be sold to hostile forces overseas, has made "very, very concrete proposals" to four nuclear-armed Soviet republics on ways to block any unauthorized exports of weaponry or technology, a senior State Department official said Friday.
NEWS
December 14, 1991 | JOHN M. BRODER and DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The United States, expressing concern that Soviet nuclear weapons could be sold to hostile forces overseas, has made "very, very concrete proposals" to four nuclear-armed Soviet republics on ways to block any unauthorized exports of weaponry or technology, a senior State Department official said Friday.
NEWS
November 10, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
U.S. officials are expressing increasing concern that the Soviet Union's extensive inventory of defense technology--including nuclear weapons hardware and expertise--may soon go on the world market as a new class of opportunistic capitalists try to turn a fast profit from superpower disintegration. Echoing a theme that has been discussed privately among U.S.
NEWS
October 4, 1994 | From a Times Staff Writer
Secretary of State Warren Christopher has decided to block the importation of as many as 7.6 million handguns and rifles from the former Soviet Union, the State Department said Monday. Christopher also ordered a study to determine why so many Russian guns are appearing on the world market and recommend what U.S. policy should be, spokesman Mike McCurry said.
NEWS
May 11, 1990 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A rogue business enterprise covertly sold to foreigners two high-tech items from the Soviet military arsenal, MIG-29 jet fighters and T-72 tanks, in "dirty and shameful" deals, according to the KGB, the state security agency. The latest chapter in arms sale scandals in the East Bloc was revealed in the agency's monthly publication, "KGB U.S.S.R."
NEWS
March 24, 1991 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Picture it: a bevy of Moscow's finest military officers standing around in a tank shed at the largest Soviet base in this city hustling an impressive array of arms and equipment to anyone with ready cash to buy. A slightly used MIG-23 attack aircraft? It's there. So is an MI-8 helicopter--at $140,000, the best deal going, confided Col. Alexander Pordunov, who squired visitors through the air force part of the sale. Something else? A few thousand 57-millimeter hand grenades, perhaps?
NEWS
November 10, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
U.S. officials are expressing increasing concern that the Soviet Union's extensive inventory of defense technology--including nuclear weapons hardware and expertise--may soon go on the world market as a new class of opportunistic capitalists try to turn a fast profit from superpower disintegration. Echoing a theme that has been discussed privately among U.S.
NEWS
May 25, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Global military spending and arms trading fell significantly in 1990 despite the buildup to the Gulf War, and the United States replaced the Soviet Union as the main exporter, taking 40% of the market, the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute said in its 1991 yearbook. Total world military spending fell in real terms by 5% to $950 billion in 1990, compared with a 2% decline in 1989, the institute said. Global trade in conventional arms fell 35%.
NEWS
March 24, 1991 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Picture it: a bevy of Moscow's finest military officers standing around in a tank shed at the largest Soviet base in this city hustling an impressive array of arms and equipment to anyone with ready cash to buy. A slightly used MIG-23 attack aircraft? It's there. So is an MI-8 helicopter--at $140,000, the best deal going, confided Col. Alexander Pordunov, who squired visitors through the air force part of the sale. Something else? A few thousand 57-millimeter hand grenades, perhaps?
NEWS
May 11, 1990 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A rogue business enterprise covertly sold to foreigners two high-tech items from the Soviet military arsenal, MIG-29 jet fighters and T-72 tanks, in "dirty and shameful" deals, according to the KGB, the state security agency. The latest chapter in arms sale scandals in the East Bloc was revealed in the agency's monthly publication, "KGB U.S.S.R."
NEWS
April 10, 1988
Worldwide arms sales may have peaked, according to figures released by the U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, but the new pattern of the weapons market shows some new and energetic players, including China, Brazil and Israel. The annual report on world military expenditures and arms transfers showed a sharp drop in 1985 and 1986, the most recent years available, from 1984. The world total of arms imports in 1984 was about $50 billion, the report said. By 1986 it had dropped to $34.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|