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SPORTS
November 17, 1989 | MIKE REILLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kelly Garrison knew the risk every time she ran down the runway toward the vaulting horse. She knew that proper timing and accuracy were a must in international gymnastics and that the slightest slip could mean the difference between winning and losing, or between winning and injury. But while training at the University of Oklahoma for the 1988 Olympics, Garrison decided to take an extra risk. Her hopes of making the team had been sinking, along with her vaulting scores.
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SPORTS
September 14, 1992 | LISA DILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Whether or not it was an unconscious reflex, former NHL defenseman Nick Beverley immediately spotted teen-ager Alexei Zhitnik playing steady defense for the then-Soviet national team at a tournament in Stockholm two years ago. Beverley, now the Kings' general manager, was then the team's assistant general manager. He searched for Zhitnik's number on his program. "When we looked him up on the roster and saw his birth date, we couldn't believe it," Beverley said.
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SPORTS
July 18, 1992 | RANDY HARVEY and SERGEI L. LOIKO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
When the game finally ended, the commentator for Soviet television, Nina Eremina, a former player for the women's national team, was too overcome by emotion to describe what she had just seen. She sat before millions of viewers across 11 time zones and 15 republics and cried. In another time and place, but in an equally improbable Olympic moment, one of Eremina's American counterparts would say, "Do you believe in miracles?"
SPORTS
July 18, 1992 | RANDY HARVEY and SERGEI L. LOIKO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
When the game finally ended, the commentator for Soviet television, Nina Eremina, a former player for the women's national team, was too overcome by emotion to describe what she had just seen. She sat before millions of viewers across 11 time zones and 15 republics and cried. In another time and place, but in an equally improbable Olympic moment, one of Eremina's American counterparts would say, "Do you believe in miracles?"
SPORTS
July 18, 1992 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Inside a small office in a deserted gym outside St. Petersburg, Russia, Vladimir Kondrashin has built a shrine to Alexander Belov, who scored the winning points in the Soviet Union's historic victory over the United States in the championship game of the 1972 Summer Olympics at Munich. Medals and pictures surround a letter of condolence from International Olympic Committee President Juan Antonio Samaranch, Spain's ambassador to the Soviet Union when Belov died in 1978.
SPORTS
April 17, 1990 | RANDY HARVEY
Soviet sports officials say that athletes formerly were considered soldiers in ideological warfare. "For a long time, there existed the belief here that the results of U.S. and Soviet athletes depicted the social systems of those countries," Marat Gramov, chairman of the national Olympic committee and a member of the International Olympic Committee, said in a recent interview. "There was an opinion that the socialist system guaranteed outstanding results. This is rubbish.
SPORTS
March 28, 1988 | Associated Press
Akhmed Atavov and the Soviet Union wrestling team beat the United States, 6-4, Sunday and won the World Cup of International Wrestling tournament title at the University of Toledo. The Soviet team finished with eight points, two ahead of the United States, after beating Australia and Cuba Saturday and defeating South Korea and the United States Sunday. Teams earned two points for each match won. The U.S.
SPORTS
September 14, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
The newly independent Baltic republics of Latvia and Estonia on Friday rejected an invitation to join a Soviet team for next year's Olympics, a Soviet wire service reported. Ulyana Semyonova, vice president of Latvia's Olympic Committee, said the republic would "by no means" accept an appeal from Soviet sports officials to form a united team for the Albertville and Barcelona Games. "We have become a separate state and we have nothing to do with the U.S.S.R.
SPORTS
September 21, 1988 | RICHARD HOFFER, Times Staff Writer
How good are the Soviets? The search for relative standards is daunting. "Their alternate , Valentin Mogulinyi, could probably be the best gymnast on any other team here," U.S. Coach Abie Grossfeld said. "Their worst score would probably be the best in any event." And so on. Let's put it another way: One of their gymnasts uncorked the first triple back somersault in Olympic competition and received a 9.85 on floor, second worst on his team.
SPORTS
April 17, 1990 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When asked last week whether elite sports in the Soviet Union will survive the country's restructuring, known as perestroika , Alexander Kozlovsky, deputy chairman of the country's state-controlled sports committee, Goskomsport, responded with a story. He said he was touring Leningrad a few years ago, when a friend asked why the beautiful Summer Garden, built in 1720 by Peter the Great, was not destroyed during the Russian Revolution.
SPORTS
July 18, 1992 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Inside a small office in a deserted gym outside St. Petersburg, Russia, Vladimir Kondrashin has built a shrine to Alexander Belov, who scored the winning points in the Soviet Union's historic victory over the United States in the championship game of the 1972 Summer Olympics at Munich. Medals and pictures surround a letter of condolence from International Olympic Committee President Juan Antonio Samaranch, Spain's ambassador to the Soviet Union when Belov died in 1978.
SPORTS
July 5, 1992 | MARK HEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As good old days go, there have been better than July of 1972, when 12 young U.S. basketball players gathered in the heavy air of Pearl Harbor to prepare to defend the national honor. This was before Reagan and Gorbachev. There were two superpowers and neither was Japan. There was a Cold War, and an undeclared hot war in Vietnam, which President Richard Nixon said must be pursued to an honorable conclusion, lest the world regard the United States as "a pitiful, helpless giant."
SPORTS
July 5, 1992 | T.J. SIMERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The KGB put Alexander Gomelski there, imprisoned in a Moscow apartment in front of a television, while his team pursued basketball immortality. Munich, 1972. No country had defeated the United States' basketball team in Olympic competition, but with only six seconds remaining, a great victory was within the Russians' grasp. Gomelski, the best basketball coach in the Soviet Union, sat silently in his chair far away. Happy, but sad.
SPORTS
March 11, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Viacheslav Kozlov, a former Soviet hockey star, has cleared a couple of hurdles in his efforts to join the Red Wings.
SPORTS
March 10, 1992 | Associated Press
The International Olympic Committee won agreement Monday for the former Soviet republics to compete together in the Olympics for the last time. Despite requests from Ukraine and Georgia to compete independently, the IOC persuaded all 12 former republics to field a unified team during the Summer Games in Barcelona, Spain. The IOC granted provisional recognition to each of the national Olympic committees of the 12 republics on the condition that they take part in a joint team.
NEWS
December 31, 1991
The arts and athletics, like nearly everything in the Soviet Union, have been dominated by the state. Beginning in 1934, all forms of art had to conform to the contradictory edicts of "socialist realism"--which mandated that art reflect both revolutionary enthusiasm and the objective portrayal of reality. State-encouraged physical fitness has produced remarkable accomplishments.
SPORTS
December 9, 1991 | RANDY HARVEY
Most experts on the riddle that is sports in the Soviet Union had one question when the government dissolved the central sports committee last week. What took so long? The committee, known as Gossport, was an inert, gluttonous dinosaur filled with pre-perestroika bureaucrats that survived as long as it did only because the government had more pressing concerns.
SPORTS
July 29, 1990 | From Associated Press
The United States wrestlers pulled off a major upset at the Goodwill Games Saturday night by defeating the Soviet Union, 17-13, before a crowd of 6,741 at Hec Edmundson Pavilion. It was the first time in 30 years that the Americans had beaten the Soviets in team competition that featured the best Soviet wrestlers. The U.S. victory was not ensured until two protests by Soviet Coach Yargin Yarygin was rejected. Four U.S. wrestlers won individual gold medals: Cory Baze at 105.
SPORTS
December 25, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The chief of the former Soviet Olympic Committee said he has pledges of financial support from abroad to field a team at the 1992 Games under the Olympic flag, the Tass news agency reported. Vitaly Smirnov said in an open letter that 11 former Soviet republics have agreed to send a joint team to the Albertville and Barcelona games.
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