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Ussr Budget

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NEWS
December 16, 1989 | From Reuters
The Soviet Union said Friday that it will reduce its military spending by more than 8% next year, and gave the most detailed description to date of its armed forces. Col. Gen. Nikolai Chervov told a news conference that cutting the military budget 8.2%, to $115 billion, was part of a program of shifting Soviet armed forces from an offensive posture to a more defensive role. As of January, 1990, Soviet military forces will number 3,993,000, he said.
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NEWS
December 1, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian Federation President Boris N. Yeltsin, moving to resolve a major budget crisis, agreed on Saturday to bail out Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's near-bankrupt central government--at a price.
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NEWS
June 14, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet legislature voted Wednesday to accelerate the development of a market economy based on the principles of supply and demand with limited government direction, thus ending the state ownership and central planning that for seven decades has been the basis of socialism here. After agonized and often angry debate, the Supreme Soviet approved by wide margins eight parts of the government's program for the difficult transition. It gave Prime Minister Nikolai I. Ryzhkov until Sept.
NEWS
November 30, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet state bank has run out of money, and the massive machine of Soviet government could grind to a halt unless Parliament unblocks new budget allotments, the bank's chairman asserted Friday. Victor V. Gerashchenko, chairman of Gosbank, told Soviet television that his staff had gathered to calculate how much was left in the treasury, and "we came to the conclusion that . . . there was no money left in the bank."
NEWS
December 30, 1990 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, his government desperately strapped for cash to finance next year's budget, imposed a 5% sales tax Saturday on all consumer goods and services, effective New Year's Day. In a brief decree, Gorbachev said that the tax is needed mainly for social programs and to reduce the budget deficit and that it will apply to sales of "manufactured and technological commodities, consumer goods, work and paid services."
NEWS
December 28, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin, in a major confrontation over the future of the Soviet Union as a federal state, has cut his republic's contribution to the national budget by 85%, threatening the whole country with imminent economic collapse, Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev told the national Parliament on Thursday.
NEWS
January 4, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Mikhail S. Gorbachev on Thursday announced a breakthrough agreement with the leaders of the Soviet Union's constituent republics on the principles of revenue-sharing that will underlie the national budget and become the basis for holding the Soviet federation together.
NEWS
January 12, 1991 | Associated Press
Lawmakers on Friday cut Soviet military spending by 8%, to 97 billion rubles, or $155 billion, a step one general called a sign of Moscow's "fundamentally new approach" to defense. The cut was part of the Kremlin's effort to reduce the government budget deficit and to ease the strain on its economy, in addition to taking advantage of warmer East-West ties.
NEWS
January 9, 1991 | Times Wire Services
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev and Russian Federation leader Boris N. Yeltsin on Tuesday resolved a dispute over the 1991 budget that threatened to cripple the Soviet economy, Tass news agency said. Vitaly Ignatenko, Gorbachev's spokesman, said that the president and Yeltsin had ironed out differences over how much money the Russian Federation should contribute to the central budget, the independent Interfax news service reported.
NEWS
August 6, 1989
The Kremlin painted a gloomy picture of the Soviet economy, with a national debt of nearly $500 billion--one that is also growing faster than that of the United States. The assessment came in a speech by State Planning Committee chairman Yuri D. Maslyukov before the Supreme Soviet, or legislature, which is to consider the 1990 budget during a session that begins Sept. 26.
NEWS
July 24, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gen. Colin L. Powell, chairman of the U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff, found a common language with Soviet generals Tuesday as they commiserated with each other over the budget cuts imposed on them by their governments. After watching a dozen Soviet T-80 main battle tanks and armored fighting vehicles fire thundering round after thundering round, Powell and Gen. Anatoly N.
NEWS
January 12, 1991 | Associated Press
Lawmakers on Friday cut Soviet military spending by 8%, to 97 billion rubles, or $155 billion, a step one general called a sign of Moscow's "fundamentally new approach" to defense. The cut was part of the Kremlin's effort to reduce the government budget deficit and to ease the strain on its economy, in addition to taking advantage of warmer East-West ties.
NEWS
January 9, 1991 | Times Wire Services
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev and Russian Federation leader Boris N. Yeltsin on Tuesday resolved a dispute over the 1991 budget that threatened to cripple the Soviet economy, Tass news agency said. Vitaly Ignatenko, Gorbachev's spokesman, said that the president and Yeltsin had ironed out differences over how much money the Russian Federation should contribute to the central budget, the independent Interfax news service reported.
NEWS
January 6, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Boris N. Yeltsin, leader of the powerful Russian republic, warned on Saturday that a "budget war" continues to threaten the Soviet Union with collapse, contrary to President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's confident predictions of a new national agreement on the economy.
NEWS
January 4, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Mikhail S. Gorbachev on Thursday announced a breakthrough agreement with the leaders of the Soviet Union's constituent republics on the principles of revenue-sharing that will underlie the national budget and become the basis for holding the Soviet federation together.
NEWS
December 30, 1990 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, his government desperately strapped for cash to finance next year's budget, imposed a 5% sales tax Saturday on all consumer goods and services, effective New Year's Day. In a brief decree, Gorbachev said that the tax is needed mainly for social programs and to reduce the budget deficit and that it will apply to sales of "manufactured and technological commodities, consumer goods, work and paid services."
NEWS
February 18, 1989 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
The Soviet leadership on Friday announced a series of broad decisions to reorient the country's economy toward greater production of consumer goods at the expense of defense spending and new development projects. The Communist Party's ruling Politburo, meeting with other top party and government officials, also ordered immediate steps to reduce the government's huge budget deficit.
NEWS
February 11, 1989 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
Challenged to prove its commitment to glasnost by disclosing its finances, the Soviet Communist Party reported Friday that its current annual budget is nearly $2.7 billion, most of which is financed by members' dues. The party newspaper Pravda said it had received many letters asking about the organization's finances, which had not been disclosed even to most party members for decades.
NEWS
December 28, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin, in a major confrontation over the future of the Soviet Union as a federal state, has cut his republic's contribution to the national budget by 85%, threatening the whole country with imminent economic collapse, Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev told the national Parliament on Thursday.
NEWS
September 26, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Soviet military spending fell last year for the first time since President Mikhail S. Gorbachev came to power in 1985, the Pentagon said. Moscow slowed the pace of arms production in 1989, particularly tanks, artillery pieces and other equipment for ground forces, the Defense Department said in an annual assessment of Soviet military might. "The likelihood of a conflict stemming from U.S.
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