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NEWS
November 9, 1990 | From Associated Press
A man who opened fire on Red Square a short distance from President Mikhail S. Gorbachev during the Revolution Day parade has been charged with committing a terrorist act, a spokesman for the KGB secret police said Thursday. Alexander A. Shmonov, 38, of Leningrad, will undergo psychiatric tests to determine whether he was sane at the time of the shooting Wednesday, said Alexei Kandaurov, deputy director of the KGB public relations office. He gave no other details on the case.
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NEWS
November 8, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There was something for everyone on Thursday as this historic city marked the 74th anniversary of the Bolshevik Revolution in a style never seen before. A pitiful band of about 1,000 Communists gathered near the battleship Aurora, famous for its role in the revolution. But their faint cries of "Long live the revolution!" were drowned out by merrymaking elsewhere. At Palace Square, St. Petersburg Mayor Anatoly A.
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NEWS
May 8, 1990
The Red Army on Wednesday will parade through Moscow's Red Square to mark the 45th anniversary of the Allies' victory in World War II. There is speculation that President Mikhail S. Gorbachev may be staging the display as a gesture to the military, which has been restive over relentless budget cuts and the realization that in the Soviet Union of the future, the armed forces may have a diminished role. The parade also comes against the backdrop of moves toward German reunification.
NEWS
October 8, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The red flags had been stuck on the facades of buildings, making bright splashes in the usual dreariness of the Moscow autumn. Most people stayed home from work. As if caught in a collective time warp, the Soviet Union marked Constitution Day on Monday--even though the document that inspired the holiday, like the country itself, has effectively ceased to exist. "We used to celebrate this day as one of our socialist holidays. But no more," Nikolai S.
NEWS
May 10, 1990 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet military got its day in the sun Wednesday for an impressive flexing of its military muscle on Red Square and the airing of its views about security matters and the social upheavals sparked by President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's reforms.
NEWS
September 9, 1991 | Associated Press
Hopes for democracy mixed with fears of renewed anti-Semitism as Soviet Jews celebrated Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish new year, in their transformed country Sunday night. About 3,000 Jews crowded Moscow's main synagogue to usher in year 5752, according to the traditional Jewish count. They included guests from the United States and Israel and from Azerbaijan and Georgia, Soviet republics where Jews have been persecuted.
NEWS
January 1, 1988 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
Decorated with flags and lights and pictures of a cheery man in a red suit and white beard, Moscow wore a festive and non-political look Thursday for the start of 1988. Traditional banners and slogans and the enormous portraits of V. I. Lenin, founder of the Soviet state, that are normally seen on other holidays have given way to colorful signs bearing the message "Happy New Year, Dear Comrades" and pictures of Ded Moroz, the gift-bringing Grandfather Frost.
NEWS
November 8, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
Fewer tanks and missiles, no icon-like portraits of the ruling Politburo and warmer Soviet-American relations marked the Red Square parade celebrating the 71st anniversary Monday of the Bolshevik Revolution that led to the formation of the Soviet state. Western envoys including U.S. Charge d'Affaires John Joyce attended the festivities for the first time since the December, 1979, intervention in Afghanistan, and U.S. and Soviet flags fluttered side by side. Representatives of U.S.
NEWS
November 8, 1989 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviet radicals on Tuesday broke from the official celebrations of the 1917 Bolshevik Revolution to demand an end to the Communist Party's monopoly on political power. More than 10,000 people marched along a main thoroughfare in central Moscow with banners demanding "Power to the people, not the party!" as troops and party activists filled Red Square for the traditional parade marking the 72nd anniversary of the revolution that brought the Communists to power.
NEWS
November 8, 1990 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every year since he was 20, Anatoly Zhuravlev was ordered to march in official parades on Soviet Revolution Day, but on Wednesday the 35-year-old factory worker demonstrated proudly against the Bolshevik Revolution. "For the first time, I feel like a human and not a robot," Zhuravlev said as he walked along the Garden Ring Road with his lanky 15-year-old son, Andrei.
NEWS
September 9, 1991 | Associated Press
Hopes for democracy mixed with fears of renewed anti-Semitism as Soviet Jews celebrated Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish new year, in their transformed country Sunday night. About 3,000 Jews crowded Moscow's main synagogue to usher in year 5752, according to the traditional Jewish count. They included guests from the United States and Israel and from Azerbaijan and Georgia, Soviet republics where Jews have been persecuted.
NEWS
May 2, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For an hour on Wednesday, about 50,000 workers stood in Red Square in the heart of the Soviet capital in nominal celebration of May Day, the holiday of the international labor movement. When the half a dozen speeches were over, they left. And there is little more to be said of May Day, 1991, in Moscow.
NEWS
February 26, 1991
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev marks his 60th birthday Saturday in an atmosphere of accelerating domestic crisis and gloomy uncertainty about the Soviet future. According to most Soviet opinion polls, Gorbachev's popularity is probably at its lowest point since he took power almost six years ago. When he took over, he did away with such rites as elaborate birthday tributes to glorify the Kremlin leadership.
NEWS
January 7, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the first time in more than seven decades, Christmas--celebrated today by Russian Orthodox Christians--is a full state holiday across Russia's vast and snowy expanse. As part of Russian Federation President Boris N. Yeltsin's ambitious plan to revive the traditions of Old Russia, the republic's legislature declared last month that Christmas, long ignored under atheist Communist ideology, should be written back into the public calendar.
NEWS
November 16, 1990 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The man who fired shots during the Revolution Day parade on Red Square last week was attempting to assassinate Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, but a police sergeant overpowered him, forcing the shots into the air, Soviet newspapers reported Thursday.
NEWS
November 11, 1990 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Red Square gunman who fired two shots across from Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev was identified Saturday as a radical activist who had hawked subversive leaflets and belonged to a new party pledged to remove the Communists from power. Vladimir A. Kryuchkov, chief of the KGB security agency, had indicated last week that officials believed Alexander A. Shmonov, 38, of Leningrad, who fired a sawed-off shotgun during the annual Revolution Day parade Wednesday, was simply insane.
NEWS
May 9, 1990 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When World War II-vintage tanks trundle across Red Square this morning, the roar of their engines will be a hymn to an institution once virtually sacrosanct but now subject to increasingly harsh criticism: the Soviet armed forces. On this Victory Day, when the Soviet Union marks the 45th anniversary of Nazi Germany's surrender and the end of the Red Army's long trek to Berlin, Mikhail S. Gorbachev, the commander in chief, has ordered a military parade.
NEWS
November 8, 1990 | Times Staff Writer
Never before have the Kremlin's high walls echoed to such words of fury on Revolution Day. As rival processions of right-wingers and radicals trooped across Red Square's slippery cobbles, these were some of the slogans they shouted or the protest signs they raised, symptoms of growing Soviet anger: RADICALS: --"1917--the Crime. 1990--the Punishment." --"Communism Is Worse Than AIDS." --"The Fascists Annihilated Other Peoples, the CPSU (Soviet Communist Party) Its Own."
NEWS
November 9, 1990 | From Associated Press
A man who opened fire on Red Square a short distance from President Mikhail S. Gorbachev during the Revolution Day parade has been charged with committing a terrorist act, a spokesman for the KGB secret police said Thursday. Alexander A. Shmonov, 38, of Leningrad, will undergo psychiatric tests to determine whether he was sane at the time of the shooting Wednesday, said Alexei Kandaurov, deputy director of the KGB public relations office. He gave no other details on the case.
NEWS
November 8, 1990 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every year since he was 20, Anatoly Zhuravlev was ordered to march in official parades on Soviet Revolution Day, but on Wednesday the 35-year-old factory worker demonstrated proudly against the Bolshevik Revolution. "For the first time, I feel like a human and not a robot," Zhuravlev said as he walked along the Garden Ring Road with his lanky 15-year-old son, Andrei.
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