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BUSINESS
August 21, 1991 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Messages flashing on the Macintosh computer screens at the offices of San Francisco/Moscow Teleport tell of tanks rumbling through Moscow and crowds massed in the streets shouting support for Boris Yeltsin and other opponents of the right-wing coup. "We are ready to give the hunta (sic) an airplane so they would fly away from our country," one politician is quoted as telling the gathering.
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BUSINESS
November 5, 1991 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
Ronald McDonald could stand a lesson in public relations--Soviet style. So could dozens of Western companies lining up to do business in the Soviet Union. That, at least, is the opinion of one Soviet official who three months ago formed the Soviet Union's first independent public relations group. But its ultimate aim isn't to teach American firms about Russian etiquette. Its goal is to learn about American style propaganda: PR.
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BUSINESS
August 23, 1991 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
IDB Communications of Culver City was just one of thousands of small telecommunications companies dotting the United States at the beginning of the week. But that has all changed. IDB stepped into a tiny slice of the spotlight thrown off by the Soviet Union's turmoil this week when it won the much coveted right to begin offering public access telephone service to the Soviet Union via Intersputnik, a Russian satellite.
NEWS
September 7, 1991 | Times Wire Services
The turmoil in the Soviet Union shows the value placed on international communications. AT&T wants the government to open additional satellite capacity to help unsnarl telephone traffic between the U.S. and the Soviet Union. Some highlights: * CONTROL. The Federal Communications Commission controls access to satellite traffic. * CALLS. AT&T says call volume to the Soviet Union is about 25 times above average, about 13,000 calls an hour.
BUSINESS
September 6, 1991 | From Associated Press
American Telephone & Telegraph Co. is seeking permission to use additional circuits on a Soviet satellite system as it attempts to unsnarl a surge in telephone traffic between the United States and the Soviet Union. AT&T, the primary carrier of calls between the two nations, asked the Federal Communications Commission to open 42 more circuits on the Soviet Intersputnik satellite system.
NEWS
December 1, 1988 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
For the first time since it went on the air 35 years ago, Radio Liberty, originally a CIA-sponsored project to broadcast news to the Soviet Union in defiance of Moscow's censors, is getting through without jamming, the U.S. government announced Wednesday. U.S. officials said the halt in jamming probably was intended by Moscow as a good-will gesture before Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's meeting next week with President Reagan and President-elect George Bush.
NEWS
September 8, 1988 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
Scientists in the Soviet Union are having trouble communicating with a sophisticated spacecraft that is speeding toward Mars, possibly jeopardizing a major U.S.-Soviet effort to study the sun with satellites from both countries. Although the Soviets have not specifically asked for U.S. assistance, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration has been informed "that they are having a problem communicating" with the spacecraft, called Phobos 1, said Raymond J.
NEWS
August 21, 1991 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL and ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Perhaps the best signal of how difficult it may be for Communist Party hard-liners to roll back the reforms of perestroika and resume power in the Soviet Union came the first morning of their coup. Among the first acts of the new Committee for the State of Emergency--after seizing control of government broadcasting facilities--was to hold a lengthy press conference.
BUSINESS
February 13, 1989 | EVELYN RICHARDSON, The Washington Post
Gregg Maryniak used to wait up to six weeks for an answer when he wrote letters to Soviet scientists with whom he is working on space technology issues. Now he just bangs a message into his computer at the Space Studies Institute in Princeton, N.J., and sends it off by electronic mail. A satellite carries it to Moscow almost instantly. As communications technology advances and international tensions abate, the flow of electronic data between the United States and the Soviet Union is quickening.
BUSINESS
September 6, 1991 | From Associated Press
American Telephone & Telegraph Co. is seeking permission to use additional circuits on a Soviet satellite system as it attempts to unsnarl a surge in telephone traffic between the United States and the Soviet Union. AT&T, the primary carrier of calls between the two nations, asked the Federal Communications Commission to open 42 more circuits on the Soviet Intersputnik satellite system.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 1991 | ANTHONY MILLICAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The message was cryptic: "I've seen the tanks with my own eyes. . . . Communists cannot rape the Mother Russia once again!" It flashed on the screens of untold thousands of personal computers across the globe, sent from the Soviet Union by a senior programmer at a fledgling communications network just hours after hard-line members of the Soviet government launched their failed coup attempt last month.
BUSINESS
August 23, 1991 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
IDB Communications of Culver City was just one of thousands of small telecommunications companies dotting the United States at the beginning of the week. But that has all changed. IDB stepped into a tiny slice of the spotlight thrown off by the Soviet Union's turmoil this week when it won the much coveted right to begin offering public access telephone service to the Soviet Union via Intersputnik, a Russian satellite.
NEWS
August 21, 1991 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL and ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Perhaps the best signal of how difficult it may be for Communist Party hard-liners to roll back the reforms of perestroika and resume power in the Soviet Union came the first morning of their coup. Among the first acts of the new Committee for the State of Emergency--after seizing control of government broadcasting facilities--was to hold a lengthy press conference.
BUSINESS
August 21, 1991 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Messages flashing on the Macintosh computer screens at the offices of San Francisco/Moscow Teleport tell of tanks rumbling through Moscow and crowds massed in the streets shouting support for Boris Yeltsin and other opponents of the right-wing coup. "We are ready to give the hunta (sic) an airplane so they would fly away from our country," one politician is quoted as telling the gathering.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 1991 | ANTHONY MILLICAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The message was cryptic: "I've seen the tanks with my own eyes. . . . Communists cannot rape the Mother Russia once again!" It flashed on the screens of untold thousands of personal computers across the globe, sent from the Soviet Union by a senior programmer at a fledgling communications network just hours after hard-line members of the Soviet government launched their failed coup attempt last month.
BUSINESS
June 7, 1990 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite America's rapidly warming friendship with the Soviet Union, the Commerce Department said Wednesday that it will move to block the export of U.S. technology for the creation of a vast, $500-million fiber-optic network that would span the Soviet Union. U.S. defense officials apparently fear that the fiber-optic network could be used for Soviet military communications, replacing the current microwave transmissions, which are relatively easy to intercept.
BUSINESS
June 7, 1990 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite America's rapidly warming friendship with the Soviet Union, the Commerce Department said Wednesday that it will move to block the export of U.S. technology for the creation of a vast, $500-million fiber-optic network that would span the Soviet Union. U.S. defense officials apparently fear that the fiber-optic network could be used for Soviet military communications, replacing the current microwave transmissions, which are relatively easy to intercept.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 1990 | ESTHER SCHRADER
Hubert Grusnys swivels his chair, flips a switch and leans towards the microphone. "That was the Boomtown Rats," he says in smooth Lithuanian. "And this is radio M-1, your independent music radio station. And now, our review of today's press. . . ." Grusnys may sound like just another disc jockey, but he works for the first independent radio station in the Soviet Union, and he and his colleagues struggled for two years just to get permission to go on the air.
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