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NEWS
June 27, 1988 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
A vast complex of new laws is being readied here as the Soviet Communist Party prepares to yield much of its direct authority to government bodies and economic enterprises in an extraordinary retreat from power. At a press conference Sunday, Deputy Justice Minister Mikhail P. Vyshinsky used these words to describe the undertaking: "A revolution is taking place here. Not everyone realizes this, but that is what it is--a revolution."
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NEWS
October 13, 1990 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a court case without precedent in the Soviet Union, an ultra-nationalist Russian was sentenced Friday to two years at hard labor for stirring up ethnic hatred at a time of increasing anti-Semitism here. Konstantin Smirnov-Ostashvili, 54, a leader of the right-wing Pamyat Society, was convicted of leading an attack on Jewish writers. He was prosecuted under a Soviet law intended to ensure harmony among the country's 100 or more ethnic groups.
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NEWS
April 10, 1988
The Soviet Union is planning sweeping legal reforms that will abolish capital punishment for all crimes except mass murder, a leading Soviet lawyer said in an interview published in the Swedish daily, Dagens Nyheter. Alexander Y. Sukharev, first deputy state prosecutor and former deputy justice minister, gave no details about when the reforms will occur. The Soviet Union allows the death penalty for 18 crimes.
NEWS
July 7, 1989
The Soviet legislature refused to confirm the first deputy chairman of the nation's highest court because he was an official in the period before perestroika, President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's program of restructuring, the official Tass news agency reported. The Supreme Soviet rejected Sergei I. Gusev by a vote of 162-127, with 73 abstentions, Tass said. Gusev, who assumed the No.
NEWS
October 13, 1990 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a court case without precedent in the Soviet Union, an ultra-nationalist Russian was sentenced Friday to two years at hard labor for stirring up ethnic hatred at a time of increasing anti-Semitism here. Konstantin Smirnov-Ostashvili, 54, a leader of the right-wing Pamyat Society, was convicted of leading an attack on Jewish writers. He was prosecuted under a Soviet law intended to ensure harmony among the country's 100 or more ethnic groups.
NEWS
November 20, 1988 | Associated Press
The Soviet Supreme Court has sentenced an Azerbaijani to death by firing squad for leading a mob that killed seven people in ethnic riots earlier this year, a witness said Saturday. The verdict against Akhmed I. Akhmedov from the republic of Azerbaijan was handed down Friday, Kuryun Naganpetyan, a Moscow-based Armenian activist, said. It was the first death penalty issued by Soviet courts growing out of the Feb. 28 riots in the Azerbaijan city of Sumgait.
NEWS
May 14, 1987 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
Karl Linnas, the wartime commandant of a German concentration camp in Estonia, has reportedly asked a Soviet court to pardon him from a death sentence imposed after his 1962 conviction, in absentia, as a war criminal. Tass, the Soviet news agency, said Wednesday that Linnas, in requesting the pardon, argued that more than 40 years have passed since the alleged offenses took place. He was convicted of ordering mass executions at the concentration camp, located at Tartu.
NEWS
May 30, 1988 | ROBERT C. TOTH, Times Staff Writer
With arms control negotiations temporarily on the back burner, the always-sensitive issue of human rights has moved up on the agenda of the summit talks that began here Sunday between President Reagan and Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 1985
In his first, real eye-to-eye confrontation with the Soviet KGB on American soil, President Ronald Reagan blinked and the Soviets laughed. As the President entertained Prince Charles and Princess Diana at a "glitz and glamour" White House reception, Ukrainian seaman Miroslav Medvid, drugged and beaten, lay, no doubt, shackled in the damp, dark hold of the Marshal Koniev as it made its way toward the Gulf of Mexico. The man who ordered the interception of an Egyptian airliner carrying Palestine Liberation Organization terrorists in international air space was afraid to intercept a Soviet grain ship carrying KGB terrorists in the Mississippi River.
NEWS
November 20, 1988 | Associated Press
The Soviet Supreme Court has sentenced an Azerbaijani to death by firing squad for leading a mob that killed seven people in ethnic riots earlier this year, a witness said Saturday. The verdict against Akhmed I. Akhmedov from the republic of Azerbaijan was handed down Friday, Kuryun Naganpetyan, a Moscow-based Armenian activist, said. It was the first death penalty issued by Soviet courts growing out of the Feb. 28 riots in the Azerbaijan city of Sumgait.
NEWS
June 27, 1988 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
A vast complex of new laws is being readied here as the Soviet Communist Party prepares to yield much of its direct authority to government bodies and economic enterprises in an extraordinary retreat from power. At a press conference Sunday, Deputy Justice Minister Mikhail P. Vyshinsky used these words to describe the undertaking: "A revolution is taking place here. Not everyone realizes this, but that is what it is--a revolution."
NEWS
May 30, 1988 | ROBERT C. TOTH, Times Staff Writer
With arms control negotiations temporarily on the back burner, the always-sensitive issue of human rights has moved up on the agenda of the summit talks that began here Sunday between President Reagan and Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev.
NEWS
May 14, 1987 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
Karl Linnas, the wartime commandant of a German concentration camp in Estonia, has reportedly asked a Soviet court to pardon him from a death sentence imposed after his 1962 conviction, in absentia, as a war criminal. Tass, the Soviet news agency, said Wednesday that Linnas, in requesting the pardon, argued that more than 40 years have passed since the alleged offenses took place. He was convicted of ordering mass executions at the concentration camp, located at Tartu.
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