Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUssr Culture
IN THE NEWS

Ussr Culture

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 1989 | GEORGE STEIN, Times Staff Writer
While Hollywood directors waited anxiously to see who would get the ultimate film prize this week, Soviet emigre director Boris Frumin wrestled with a more modest goal. He is hoping his recently released "Errors of Youth"--made in 1977--will be a ticket to work again as a director.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 31, 1991
The arts and athletics, like nearly everything in the Soviet Union, have been dominated by the state. Beginning in 1934, all forms of art had to conform to the contradictory edicts of "socialist realism"--which mandated that art reflect both revolutionary enthusiasm and the objective portrayal of reality. State-encouraged physical fitness has produced remarkable accomplishments.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1988 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
"Portrait of the Soviet Union" may be Ted Turner's crowning achievement in programming, a seven-hour documentary of panoramic sweep and rich, gleaming production values that narrows the gap between the United States and an old enemy. In many respects, unfortunately, it also projects a view through Red-colored glasses, one that maximizes Soviet strengths and minimizes Soviet weaknesses, one that disappoints even as it dazzles.
NEWS
November 26, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stanislav Gronsky, a gangly, 28-year-old engineer with a pale, horsy face, figures he could moonlight loading boxes or work as a watchman all three shifts a day and take home a triple salary. Lida, a slim, studious art historian, has started to think about abandoning her profession and taking a higher-paying job as a janitor. And Igor, a blond, acne-pitted wheeler-dealer of 22, calculates that if he can just get the start-up money, he could build his own china factory.
NEWS
October 9, 1988 | DAVID REMNICK, the Washington Post
Andrei Bitov offers his guests shot glasses of brandy for breakfast. It seems this is a literary meal. "There is a proverb all Russians repeat," Bitov says, "One drink in the morning and you are free for the whole day." Bitov, an extraordinary novelist and a world-class talker, lets his brandy sit. His guests, however, drink to the health of "Pushkin House," Bitov's psychological novel that has been published officially here 17 years after its completion.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Exiled from the Soviet Union more than a decade ago as an "ideological degenerate" and a "renegade to the motherland," the renowned cellist Mstislav Rostropovich returned to Moscow this week unrepentant--and victorious. "When we left, the Soviet Union was an island of lies, big lies," Rostropovich said, recalling how he had gone abroad to work in 1974 and then been stripped of his Soviet citizenship four years later. "Now the Soviet Union is cleansing itself. . . .
NEWS
October 17, 1989 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
We hate to tell you this, Comrade Mukhortov, but those aliens you claim to have interviewed near Moscow probably weren't really from another planet. For Times readers who do not subscribe to Komsomolskaya Pravda, the Communist Party youth newspaper, Pavel Mukhortov was identified in Thursday's edition of the official Soviet publication as a reporter who had chatted with a few exotic aliens.
NEWS
April 13, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After many a smirk and a giggle, Soviet lawmakers on Friday approved a liberal measure that, instead of cracking down on sexual glasnost , would set up a new government panel to draw the fine line between harmless erotica and nasty pornography.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Western cinematic images of the Soviet Union, mostly the product of decades of spy movies and other films about the Cold War, are about to be challenged by a new film that its director says will show "a different Russia," one that is gentler and more human, a country that today is deeply troubled but undergoing profound changes.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 1990 | ELIZABETH TUCKER, Tucker is a Moscow-based writer .
She stands like a steel reed on the stage of the Bolshoi Conservatory, her tiny figure encased in gold lame, her mouth marked by a single streak of scarlet. Only her hands move, now flaying a violent chord, now lulling the violin almost to sleep. At intermission, the audience is ecstatic; fans rush the stage, shower her with flowers, even kneel at her feet and kiss her hand. At performance's end, after three encores, she is flooded with roses, tulips and carnations--more than 50 bouquets in all.
NEWS
November 23, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nikolai Golovenkov took the tiny hand of his son, Tolik, and walked up to a barricade of stones, concrete slabs and metal playground equipment that stands near the Russian Parliament as a symbol of the victory of the people's resistance over the reactionary coup. He crouched down to Tolik's eye level and pointed to places where tanks had stood and to one of the doorways of the mammoth, white-stone building where he had been posted to prevent "evil men" from entering.
NEWS
November 14, 1991 | STEVEN GUTTERMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Misha Belyayev stands in the failing light of a gray autumn afternoon beneath an overpass at the busy intersection of Moscow's main Ring Road and the Boulevard of Flowers. In his hands, the 12-year-old holds the tools of his trade: a filthy scrap of cloth and a rusty can of window cleaner.
NEWS
November 7, 1991 | ZAN DUBIN, Zan Dubin is a Times staff writer who writes about the arts for The Times Orange County Edition
Like legions of little boys, Bibs Ekkel played piano as a child. But at 18, he fell inlove with the balalaika and never looked back. The result is Tziganka, a Russian folk troupe that will bring music, song and dance to Costa Mesa's Orange Coast College Saturday night.
BUSINESS
November 5, 1991 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
Ronald McDonald could stand a lesson in public relations--Soviet style. So could dozens of Western companies lining up to do business in the Soviet Union. That, at least, is the opinion of one Soviet official who three months ago formed the Soviet Union's first independent public relations group. But its ultimate aim isn't to teach American firms about Russian etiquette. Its goal is to learn about American style propaganda: PR.
NEWS
September 29, 1991 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"I would hang Gorbachev from a tree!" shouts Maria Ivanova, a retired dishwasher, pointing to the very branch she has in mind for the man she blames for the plunge in her standard of living. But at the mention of dictator Josef Stalin--who killed, jailed or tortured millions of Soviets earlier this century while building a state-run economy of stifling bureaucracy--Ivanova's 75-year-old eyes brighten and she flashes the thumbs-up sign: "I still love him!"
NEWS
September 24, 1991 | TYLER MARSHALL
Russians have not always worried about winter. Despite its renowned severity, the season of hard, numbing cold was once a time of leisure for the Russian peasant--a time to sleep in front of the stove and enjoy the fruits of his labors during the previous three seasons. It is a time of year glorified in Russian lore and romanticized in the country's literature.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 1989 | ELIZABETH CHRISTIE
Glasnost has freed artist Andrei Kazakov. A 28-year-old graduate of one of Moscow's most prestigious art institutes, Kazakov no longer faces the choice that so many nonconformist artists have had to make in the Soviet Union over the years--paint according to Socialist Realism or starve. President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's policy of glasnost, or political openness, is allowing Kazakov to prosper in ways unimaginable even four or five years ago. "What freedom!"
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 1988 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
Soviet rock music, on a roll for a year or more in this Gorbachev era of glasnost , has become a politically divisive issue. In ever stronger counterpoint, conservative critics, using language that strangely echoes the hysterical anti-rock sentiments heard in the West, have charged that the popularity of rock is a threat to the nation's moral fiber and possibly even a plot by anti-Communist strategists in the West. Rock musicians scoff at the allegations.
NEWS
September 17, 1991 | STANLEY MEISLER and ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
"An intelligent woman is the enemy of men," lamented a middle-aged woman pediatrician here in the grim, depressed capital of East Slovakia. More than a thousand miles away in a suburb of bustling Madrid, Jose Paniagua, the Spanish owner of a car agency and repair garage, set down his maxim about women on the job: "I don't like women at work, at least in my business. Because they are always asking for time off. . . .
NEWS
September 9, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The artist in Valery Lepikura gets the better of him as he tries to explain why the banned Communist Party, stripped of its riches and branded as criminal, will still be the guiding force in Soviet life. The bearded radio personality pulls a clean sheet of paper before him to draw what he cannot describe. On the left side, he sketches a hierarchy representing the management of Ukrainian Radio and Television, where he has worked for 26 years.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|