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NEWS
May 31, 1987 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
Defense Minister Sergei L. Sokolov and the head of Soviet air defenses were removed Saturday after the Politburo denounced the military for allowing a teen-age West German pilot to fly a light plane from the Baltic to the heart of Moscow. The Tass news agency said Sokolov, 75, was relieved of his duties in "connection with his retirement" and replaced by General of the Army Dmitri T. Yazov, 63. The head of the air defense forces, Chief Marshal Alexander I. Koldunov, 63, was fired.
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NEWS
December 20, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Secretary of State James A. Baker III agreed Thursday that Russia should retain part of the massive Soviet nuclear arsenal, even though most of the missiles are aimed at the United States and its allies, because a nuclear-free Russia would upset the concept of deterrence that has kept the peace for the last four decades.
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NEWS
June 1, 1987 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev acted quickly to shake up his defense command "before the military could protect themselves" after the penetration of Soviet air defenses by a teen-aged West German pilot, Western analysts here said Sunday. "He needed to show them (the military) who is in charge," one Soviet specialist here commented. The dismissal of Defense Minister Sergei L. Sokolov and the head of the air defense forces, Chief Marshal Alexander I.
NEWS
November 10, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
U.S. officials are expressing increasing concern that the Soviet Union's extensive inventory of defense technology--including nuclear weapons hardware and expertise--may soon go on the world market as a new class of opportunistic capitalists try to turn a fast profit from superpower disintegration. Echoing a theme that has been discussed privately among U.S.
NEWS
February 11, 1990 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee proposed Saturday that the United States and Soviet Union undertake an unprecedented overhaul of the safeguards they have in place to protect against an accidental or unauthorized launch of nuclear weapons. Sen. Sam Nunn (D-Ga.) said he will make a formal proposal soon to Defense Secretary Dick Cheney to begin a sweeping review of existing mechanisms adopted by the armed forces to ensure the security of the nation's nuclear weapons.
NEWS
July 23, 1989 | ROBERT C. TOTH, Times Staff Writer
Quietly and without any public debate, the Bush Administration is preparing drastic changes in the basic U.S. strategy for fighting a nuclear war with the Soviet Union, including the creation of new weapons so devastating that they could penetrate the deepest underground bunkers and "decapitate" the entire Soviet leadership.
NEWS
December 27, 1987 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
The Soviet Union disclosed for the first time Saturday that it has about 50,000 tons of chemical weapons in its arsenal, which it said corresponds to the American arsenal of poisonous substances. Until earlier this year, the Kremlin never admitted that its armed forces had any chemical weapons, but the revelation of an approximate figure by the Soviet Foreign Ministry in a formal statement may speed negotiation of a Soviet-American treaty to ban production or possession of such toxic materials.
NEWS
December 16, 1989 | From Reuters
The Soviet Union said Friday that it will reduce its military spending by more than 8% next year, and gave the most detailed description to date of its armed forces. Col. Gen. Nikolai Chervov told a news conference that cutting the military budget 8.2%, to $115 billion, was part of a program of shifting Soviet armed forces from an offensive posture to a more defensive role. As of January, 1990, Soviet military forces will number 3,993,000, he said.
NEWS
January 13, 1988 | SARA FRITZ, Times Staff Writer
Contrary to President Reagan's public statements at the time, U.S. intelligence officials quickly determined in 1983 that the Soviet Union had shot down a Korean Air Lines 747 without realizing that it was a civilian airliner, according to documents made public Tuesday. On Sept.
NEWS
December 2, 1990 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, warning that his country's defense capabilities are under threat, decreed Saturday that rebellious Soviet republics no longer can be allowed to challenge Moscow's military policy, particularly by interfering with conscription. Gorbachev's decree came in reaction to attempts by governments in the Soviet Union's 15 constituent republics to establish their own armies or to limit the military service of their youth to their own territory.
NEWS
October 15, 1991 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For 10 years, Sergei Kushpetovsky loyally served the Motherland, rising to the rank of captain in the Soviet army. Then eight months ago, the unthinkable happened--the Motherland fired him. "I gave everything I had to the country and got nothing back," Kushpetovsky said. "I have a family to support, and they didn't give me a kopeck to live on."
NEWS
October 12, 1991 | ROBERT C. TOTH and MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
By agreeing to consider proposals for non-nuclear antimissile defense systems, Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev has breathed new life into the controversial "Star Wars" program at a time when it is particularly vulnerable to post-Cold War defense cuts. The startling move, which came last week in the Soviet response to President Bush's reductions in the U.S.
NEWS
October 6, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a full week's deliberation, Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev responded dramatically to President Bush on Saturday night by announcing sweeping cuts in Soviet tactical nuclear arms and seeking urgent talks to slash already dwindling superpower strategic arsenals by half. In his Sept. 27 initiative, Bush urged the Soviets to destroy their short-range nuclear weapons.
NEWS
October 6, 1991 | Associated Press
Highlights of Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's announcement of major nuclear-arms reductions, in response to President Bush's proposals of Sept. 27: UNILATERAL MOVES * Eliminate nuclear artillery and nuclear warheads from tactical rockets. * Move nuclear-tipped Zenith missiles to a central base and destroy some of them. * Remove all tactical nuclear weapons from ships and from multipurpose submarines. * Remove heavy bombers similar to the U.S.
NEWS
October 2, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet Union, which has the world's largest armed forces, is considering plans to cut them by as much as half in the next three years, a senior Soviet Defense Ministry official said Tuesday. Col. Gen. Pavel Grachev, the newly appointed first deputy defense minister, told a legislative hearing that the reduction could take the Soviet armed forces from the present 4.2 million to as few as 2 million or 2.5 million by the end of 1994, the news agency Interfax reported.
NEWS
September 30, 1991 | DON SHANNON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bush Administration officials said Sunday that the Soviets have responded enthusiastically to President Bush's initiative unilaterally reducing nuclear weapons and called the prospects for a complementary reaction promising. Secretary of Defense Dick Cheney, interviewed on ABC's "This Week with David Brinkley," said Bush telephoned both Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev and Russian Federation President Boris N. Yeltsin before making his Oval Office address Friday night.
NEWS
July 29, 1991 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When negotiations for the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty, or START, began in 1982, the two superpowers stared each other down with arsenals of long-range nuclear weapons that totaled roughly 8,500 Soviet warheads and 9,000 American units. In those chilly days of nuclear rivalry, Dmitri F. Ustinov, the Soviet defense minister at the time, marked the occasion by charging that Washington was aiming to "attain military superiority over the Soviet Union."
NEWS
September 30, 1991 | DON SHANNON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bush Administration officials said Sunday that the Soviets have responded enthusiastically to President Bush's initiative unilaterally reducing nuclear weapons and called the prospects for a complementary reaction promising. Secretary of Defense Dick Cheney, interviewed on ABC's "This Week with David Brinkley," said Bush telephoned both Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev and Russian Federation President Boris N. Yeltsin before making his Oval Office address Friday night.
NEWS
September 29, 1991 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush's sweeping proposals to reduce short-range nuclear weapons and pull U.S. nuclear forces back from the brink of confrontation were aimed principally at helping Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev do the same things in the Soviet Union--where the issue of who controls nuclear weapons is still a chillingly open question.
NEWS
September 29, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev on Saturday praised the reductions in the U.S. nuclear arsenal announced by President Bush as "significant steps toward a nuclear-free world," and he promised that the Soviet Union "will reciprocate." Without responding with immediate proposals of his own, Gorbachev said he and Bush agreed Friday to immediate Soviet-American talks on ways to accelerate the disarmament process.
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