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Ussr Development And Redevelopment

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NEWS
April 20, 1991 | From Associated Press
The Soviet Union and South Korea agreed today to broad new economic cooperation and a joint multibillion-dollar natural gas development project in the Soviet Far East, state-run KBS television reported. The Soviet Union also reaffirmed its position that if North Korea refuses to sign the nuclear safeguard treaty it will suspend supplies of nuclear fuel, technology and other help to its longtime Communist ally, KBS said.
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NEWS
October 27, 1991 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last spring, the Soviet government announced plans to build a coal-fired, 800-megawatt electricity generating station in this Siberian industrial city. The plant would have been so huge that designers were planning a smokestack 500 feet high to get rid of all the smoke. In years past, the project might have caused little stir under a system whose main slogan was "communism equals Soviet power plus electrification of the whole country."
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NEWS
January 8, 1988 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
The late Soviet leader Nikita S. Khrushchev received a rare accolade in the press Thursday, one day after his successor's name was all but wiped off the map. The praise for Khrushchev, who was general secretary of the Soviet Communist Party from 1953 to 1964, came in a commentary by a local newspaper, Moscow Pravda, applauding the decision to remove the name of Leonid I. Brezhnev from a neighborhood district in Moscow, a city in the Tatar Autonomous Republic and squares in Leningrad and Moscow.
NEWS
October 4, 1991 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rising out of the Kazakhstan steppe just southeast of this Central Asian coal mining city is a slice of the American dream: a private housing development. Although the land remains state-owned and supervised, the roughly 1,000 houses under construction here are the property of private Soviet citizens, who, much like millions of homeowners in the West, have taken out 25-year mortgages from the local bank to fulfill one of the most bourgeois of hopes.
NEWS
October 4, 1991 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rising out of the Kazakhstan steppe just southeast of this Central Asian coal mining city is a slice of the American dream: a private housing development. Although the land remains state-owned and supervised, the roughly 1,000 houses under construction here are the property of private Soviet citizens, who, much like millions of homeowners in the West, have taken out 25-year mortgages from the local bank to fulfill one of the most bourgeois of hopes.
NEWS
October 27, 1991 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last spring, the Soviet government announced plans to build a coal-fired, 800-megawatt electricity generating station in this Siberian industrial city. The plant would have been so huge that designers were planning a smokestack 500 feet high to get rid of all the smoke. In years past, the project might have caused little stir under a system whose main slogan was "communism equals Soviet power plus electrification of the whole country."
BUSINESS
June 13, 1991 | KAREN TUMULTY and CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The World Bank, stepping up its assistance to the formerly communist republics of Eastern Europe, announced Wednesday that it has extended $680 million in loans to Poland and that it expects to offer an additional $1.5 billion to projects in the region in coming weeks. The loans are targeted at projects the bank believes are crucial to helping those nations make the difficult conversion from government-run to market economies.
NEWS
August 8, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Abruptly dropping his diplomatic reserve, outgoing U.S. Ambassador Jack F. Matlock Jr. on Wednesday attacked Congress as the source of his greatest frustrations while in Moscow, accusing lawmakers of ignoring the needs of his staff and even endangering their lives by failing to agree on how to replace the decrepit U.S. mission here.
NEWS
August 1, 1991 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Senate, moving an embarrassing 6-year-old diplomatic fiasco a little closer to a conclusion, voted Wednesday to spend $130 million to demolish and begin reconstruction of the new U.S. Embassy in Moscow, which is riddled with bugging devices. The money to tear down the building, left unfinished after the Soviet listening devices were discovered, was included in a $22-billion appropriations bill for the departments of State, Justice and Commerce.
NEWS
August 8, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Abruptly dropping his diplomatic reserve, outgoing U.S. Ambassador Jack F. Matlock Jr. on Wednesday attacked Congress as the source of his greatest frustrations while in Moscow, accusing lawmakers of ignoring the needs of his staff and even endangering their lives by failing to agree on how to replace the decrepit U.S. mission here.
NEWS
August 1, 1991 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Senate, moving an embarrassing 6-year-old diplomatic fiasco a little closer to a conclusion, voted Wednesday to spend $130 million to demolish and begin reconstruction of the new U.S. Embassy in Moscow, which is riddled with bugging devices. The money to tear down the building, left unfinished after the Soviet listening devices were discovered, was included in a $22-billion appropriations bill for the departments of State, Justice and Commerce.
BUSINESS
June 13, 1991 | KAREN TUMULTY and CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The World Bank, stepping up its assistance to the formerly communist republics of Eastern Europe, announced Wednesday that it has extended $680 million in loans to Poland and that it expects to offer an additional $1.5 billion to projects in the region in coming weeks. The loans are targeted at projects the bank believes are crucial to helping those nations make the difficult conversion from government-run to market economies.
NEWS
April 20, 1991 | From Associated Press
The Soviet Union and South Korea agreed today to broad new economic cooperation and a joint multibillion-dollar natural gas development project in the Soviet Far East, state-run KBS television reported. The Soviet Union also reaffirmed its position that if North Korea refuses to sign the nuclear safeguard treaty it will suspend supplies of nuclear fuel, technology and other help to its longtime Communist ally, KBS said.
NEWS
January 8, 1988 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
The late Soviet leader Nikita S. Khrushchev received a rare accolade in the press Thursday, one day after his successor's name was all but wiped off the map. The praise for Khrushchev, who was general secretary of the Soviet Communist Party from 1953 to 1964, came in a commentary by a local newspaper, Moscow Pravda, applauding the decision to remove the name of Leonid I. Brezhnev from a neighborhood district in Moscow, a city in the Tatar Autonomous Republic and squares in Leningrad and Moscow.
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