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NEWS
July 28, 1991 | JACK NELSON, TIMES WASHINGTON BUREAU CHIEF
Soviet citizens, while obsessed with their country's dismal economic plight, overwhelmingly oppose private ownership of basic industries and have serious reservations about transforming their state-operated economy into a free-market system, a new poll indicates.
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NEWS
November 22, 1991 | Reuters
Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze will devote much of the early part of his new term of office to domestic affairs, his spokesman said Thursday. Vitaly Churkin told a news conference that Shevardnadze, reappointed Tuesday 11 months after he quit as foreign minister, has canceled all trips abroad. Instead, he will travel around the 12 Soviet republics.
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NEWS
November 22, 1991 | Reuters
Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze will devote much of the early part of his new term of office to domestic affairs, his spokesman said Thursday. Vitaly Churkin told a news conference that Shevardnadze, reappointed Tuesday 11 months after he quit as foreign minister, has canceled all trips abroad. Instead, he will travel around the 12 Soviet republics.
NEWS
September 6, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Power in the Soviet Union shifted decisively away from the central government Thursday, effectively ending not only seven decades of Soviet rule but centuries of Kremlin domination. The Congress of People's Deputies, acknowledging the failure of a political system that could not save the country from collapse, voted to abolish the system. Amending the Soviet constitution after four days of debate, the deputies left only a skeletal government in place.
NEWS
September 6, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Power in the Soviet Union shifted decisively away from the central government Thursday, effectively ending not only seven decades of Soviet rule but centuries of Kremlin domination. The Congress of People's Deputies, acknowledging the failure of a political system that could not save the country from collapse, voted to abolish the system. Amending the Soviet constitution after four days of debate, the deputies left only a skeletal government in place.
NEWS
September 6, 1991 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A heartened Bush Administration on Thursday welcomed the historic agreement in Moscow to remake the Soviet Union as a sign of an important new bonding between center and republics that senior officials said may halt the disruptive slide toward disunion. The favorable response reflected a widespread sense of relief in the Administration that, after 16 days in which events in the world's largest nation threatened to spin ever more out of control, the Soviets seemed to have fashioned a brake.
NEWS
May 19, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the blessing of President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, two Soviet officials have issued a startling proposal for the United States and other industrialized democracies: a request for massive economic aid in exchange for explicit, formal guarantees of continued domestic reform. The plan's chief author, Grigory A.
NEWS
August 1, 1991 | DOYLE McMANUS and MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
For the span of this week's superpower summit, the towers of the Kremlin almost sparkled under clear blue skies. A gentle breeze swept the air clean. Lovers promenaded in Gorky Park. And the uplifting spirit of summer seemed ready to last forever. Just so, George Bush and Mikhail S. Gorbachev ended their meetings Wednesday with plans for a "grand alliance" of boundless superpower cooperation.
NEWS
June 7, 1991 | From Associated Press
Mikhail S. Gorbachev, stung by criticism of his policy on the Baltic republics, warned Western powers Thursday against getting involved in internal Soviet affairs by encouraging separatist movements. Gorbachev visited Sweden and Norway, where he delivered his Nobel Peace Prize lecture Wednesday, but his triumph was clouded by questions about Soviet troop attacks in secessionist Lithuania.
NEWS
September 6, 1991 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Newly appointed Soviet Foreign Minister Boris N. Pankin on Thursday stressed continuity in foreign policy but left little doubt that as the country itself takes new shape, so too will the substance and conduct of its foreign affairs.
NEWS
September 6, 1991 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A heartened Bush Administration on Thursday welcomed the historic agreement in Moscow to remake the Soviet Union as a sign of an important new bonding between center and republics that senior officials said may halt the disruptive slide toward disunion. The favorable response reflected a widespread sense of relief in the Administration that, after 16 days in which events in the world's largest nation threatened to spin ever more out of control, the Soviets seemed to have fashioned a brake.
NEWS
September 6, 1991 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Newly appointed Soviet Foreign Minister Boris N. Pankin on Thursday stressed continuity in foreign policy but left little doubt that as the country itself takes new shape, so too will the substance and conduct of its foreign affairs.
NEWS
August 1, 1991 | DOYLE McMANUS and MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
For the span of this week's superpower summit, the towers of the Kremlin almost sparkled under clear blue skies. A gentle breeze swept the air clean. Lovers promenaded in Gorky Park. And the uplifting spirit of summer seemed ready to last forever. Just so, George Bush and Mikhail S. Gorbachev ended their meetings Wednesday with plans for a "grand alliance" of boundless superpower cooperation.
NEWS
July 28, 1991 | JACK NELSON, TIMES WASHINGTON BUREAU CHIEF
Soviet citizens, while obsessed with their country's dismal economic plight, overwhelmingly oppose private ownership of basic industries and have serious reservations about transforming their state-operated economy into a free-market system, a new poll indicates.
NEWS
June 7, 1991 | From Associated Press
Mikhail S. Gorbachev, stung by criticism of his policy on the Baltic republics, warned Western powers Thursday against getting involved in internal Soviet affairs by encouraging separatist movements. Gorbachev visited Sweden and Norway, where he delivered his Nobel Peace Prize lecture Wednesday, but his triumph was clouded by questions about Soviet troop attacks in secessionist Lithuania.
NEWS
May 19, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the blessing of President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, two Soviet officials have issued a startling proposal for the United States and other industrialized democracies: a request for massive economic aid in exchange for explicit, formal guarantees of continued domestic reform. The plan's chief author, Grigory A.
NEWS
February 23, 1991 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Concerned about the fate of Mikhail S. Gorbachev as a key element in future U.S.-Soviet relations, U.S. analysts say they are puzzled by the Soviet president's attempt to play peacemaker in the Persian Gulf. The effort, fraught with pitfalls, risks his ties to the Western nations he needs to help rebuild his shattered economy, they say.
NEWS
December 10, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This was to be President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's day of glory as he received the Nobel Peace Prize in recognition of the dramatic way in which his reforms of the Soviet Union have changed the world. But instead of receiving the prize in Oslo and outlining his vision of a peaceful new world order in his Nobel address, Gorbachev will be presiding today over a meeting of the Soviet Communist Party's Central Committee on what can be done to reverse the country's economic disintegration.
NEWS
February 23, 1991 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Concerned about the fate of Mikhail S. Gorbachev as a key element in future U.S.-Soviet relations, U.S. analysts say they are puzzled by the Soviet president's attempt to play peacemaker in the Persian Gulf. The effort, fraught with pitfalls, risks his ties to the Western nations he needs to help rebuild his shattered economy, they say.
NEWS
December 10, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This was to be President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's day of glory as he received the Nobel Peace Prize in recognition of the dramatic way in which his reforms of the Soviet Union have changed the world. But instead of receiving the prize in Oslo and outlining his vision of a peaceful new world order in his Nobel address, Gorbachev will be presiding today over a meeting of the Soviet Communist Party's Central Committee on what can be done to reverse the country's economic disintegration.
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