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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 1990 | ANNE C. ROARK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just as the United States is launching a war on scientific illiteracy, the Soviet Union is also trying to reform science and math education--but in almost exactly the opposite direction. At a meeting Friday at Cal State Long Beach, a leader of the Soviet reform movement told U.S. educators that the Soviet system fails to educate the best and brightest science and math students. Unlike the U.S.
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NEWS
December 19, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Branislava S. Fridman has been teaching history to Moscow schoolchildren for 41 years, but these days she has to spend three hours a night preparing her lessons. That's because much of what she used to teach now looks more like fiction than history. And Fridman, along with so many other teachers, is searching for the truth.
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BUSINESS
September 23, 1989 | JOHN O'DELL, Times Staff Writer
Bringing profit to the land of perestroika-- where President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's reform policies have barely begun to penetrate the Soviet Union's cumbersome bureaucracy--will be no easy task. But it is one that Dennis Aigner, dean of the UCI Graduate School of Management, is looking forward to. Aigner, in what would be the first program of its kind, is proposing to establish a joint two-year graduate program for students from UC Irvine and Moscow State University.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 1991 | MARY ANNE PEREZ
Changes proposed this week by Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev to move the Soviet Union away from Marxism have already begun in three schools, said a former Soviet minister of education who visited with high-tech firms and universities this week. The change is occurring as schools adopt different philosophies and as professors who refuse to accept new ideologies retire, said Ivan F. Obraztsov, who served as the top education official in the Soviet government for 17 years.
BUSINESS
September 13, 1989 | DAVID OLMOS, Times Staff Writer
Charles W. Missler, chairman of Phoenix Group International, said Tuesday that knowing the right people helped his Irvine-based, high-technology company nail down a deal to supply personal computers to the Soviet Union. But just in case knowing the right people was not enough, Missler said, his small company tried to impress its prospective Soviet customers by flying them to Silicon Valley meetings with corporate chieftains in a leased Lear jet and in a helicopter.
NEWS
June 17, 1988
President Reagan told a group of high school seniors that they and their Soviet counterparts must "bring peoples of other cultures together in a common bond of humanity." Reagan, addressing the winners of the Presidential Scholars Medallion, advised the students to "stand forthrightly for the values of our whole way of life and what it is based upon." The President, recalling that he had spoken to students at Moscow State University during the recent U.S.
NEWS
September 4, 1988 | From Reuters
Soviet high school students will be given supplements to their history books by the start of next year to fill in "blank spots" in their knowledge of the country's past, a senior education official said Saturday. Vladimir D. Shadrikov, deputy chief of the State Committee for People's Education, said the supplements will include chapters on a power struggle preceding the 1917 Bolshevik Revolution, the repressions of the Stalin Era and ousted leader Nikita S. Khrushchev.
NEWS
September 8, 1990 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviet history has taken on many forms for Yuri I. Korablev, a textbook writer who published one version of history before President Mikhail S. Gorbachev came to power and another after Gorbachev's openness policies proved the old version full of lies. Now he is working on yet a third. The first book was written in the late 1970s, when the only history published was history as it was proclaimed by now disgraced leader Leonid I. Brezhnev.
NEWS
November 9, 1989 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite years of studying the subject, the average Soviet citizen knows even less geography than the average American, according to a National Geographic Society survey released Wednesday. Both superpowers, in fact, are outclassed in geographical knowledge by countries like Sweden and West Germany. A sizable number of Soviets and Americans cannot even spot their own countries on a map. Only a few weeks before the December summit meeting between President Bush and Soviet President Mikhail S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 1991 | MARY ANNE PEREZ
Changes proposed this week by Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev to move the Soviet Union away from Marxism have already begun in three schools, said a former Soviet minister of education who visited with high-tech firms and universities this week. The change is occurring as schools adopt different philosophies and as professors who refuse to accept new ideologies retire, said Ivan F. Obraztsov, who served as the top education official in the Soviet government for 17 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 1990 | ANNE C. ROARK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just as the United States is launching a war on scientific illiteracy, the Soviet Union is also trying to reform science and math education--but in almost exactly the opposite direction. At a meeting Friday at Cal State Long Beach, a leader of the Soviet reform movement told U.S. educators that the Soviet system fails to educate the best and brightest science and math students. Unlike the U.S.
NEWS
October 25, 1990 | IVANA STEPANKOVA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Both the United States and the Soviet Union "are undermining and eroding their respective educational systems," Roald Sagdeev, a leading Soviet physicist and adviser to Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, has told a University of Maryland group. And in the future, he said, "the entire world may pay for these mistakes." Sagdeev, head of the newly created East-West Science and Technology Center on the College Park, Md.
NEWS
September 8, 1990 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviet history has taken on many forms for Yuri I. Korablev, a textbook writer who published one version of history before President Mikhail S. Gorbachev came to power and another after Gorbachev's openness policies proved the old version full of lies. Now he is working on yet a third. The first book was written in the late 1970s, when the only history published was history as it was proclaimed by now disgraced leader Leonid I. Brezhnev.
NEWS
April 12, 1990 | MASHA HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the old turntable played a pre-revolutionary Russian folk song at Preschool No. 804, 5-year-old Natasha was doing something that once would have been strictly forbidden in a Soviet classroom. She wasn't dancing. Because she felt shy, Natasha was allowed to watch quietly as her classmates spun and twirled.
NEWS
April 2, 1990 | MICHAEL QUINTANILLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If Semyon A. Simbirtsev and Artak Meyroyan have their way, millions of Soviets will soon be following the 12 steps of Alcoholics Anonymous. They will exercise to ease stress and disregard the advice of many Soviet physicians who prescribe "a shot of cognac" at the first sign of illness or depression. The two Soviets, specialists in alcoholism, are investigating American methods of treatment. That investigation recently brought them to a detox center in Skid Row.
NEWS
November 9, 1989 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite years of studying the subject, the average Soviet citizen knows even less geography than the average American, according to a National Geographic Society survey released Wednesday. Both superpowers, in fact, are outclassed in geographical knowledge by countries like Sweden and West Germany. A sizable number of Soviets and Americans cannot even spot their own countries on a map. Only a few weeks before the December summit meeting between President Bush and Soviet President Mikhail S.
NEWS
September 12, 1989 | DAVID OLMOS, Times Staff Writer
A small Irvine company has been picked to supply up to six million personal computers to schools and businesses in the Soviet Union and to assist the Soviets in establishing their own PC industry.
BUSINESS
September 23, 1989 | JOHN O'DELL, Times Staff Writer
Bringing profit to the land of perestroika-- where President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's reform policies have barely begun to penetrate the Soviet Union's cumbersome bureaucracy--will be no easy task. But it is one that Dennis Aigner, dean of the UCI Graduate School of Management, is looking forward to. Aigner, in what would be the first program of its kind, is proposing to establish a joint two-year graduate program for students from UC Irvine and Moscow State University.
BUSINESS
September 13, 1989 | DAVID OLMOS, Times Staff Writer
Charles W. Missler, chairman of Phoenix Group International, said Tuesday that knowing the right people helped his Irvine-based, high-technology company nail down a deal to supply personal computers to the Soviet Union. But just in case knowing the right people was not enough, Missler said, his small company tried to impress its prospective Soviet customers by flying them to Silicon Valley meetings with corporate chieftains in a leased Lear jet and in a helicopter.
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