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NEWS
March 22, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under pressure from top Soviet government and Communist Party officials, Moscow city authorities agreed Wednesday to permit a weeklong international Jewish film festival despite their earlier fears that the festival might bring anti-Semitic demonstrations. Reversing their previous decision, the city authorities said that "the political situation in the city . . . was less complicated" and that security could be provided for those attending the festival, scheduled to begin Saturday.
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NEWS
September 22, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mikola Khorbal would have been much more impressive if he had taped his suit jacket to the seat of his pants. But for someone unschooled in the tricks of the television trade, the former political prisoner, now active in the Ukrainian independence movement, did fairly well in his first on-camera interview. "It happens often that your jacket will crease, riding up on your shoulders as you lean forward to talk," explained John B.
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NEWS
May 31, 1988 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
Liberal supporters of Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev complained Monday that their conservative opponents are squeezing them out of a special Communist Party conference called to push forward his sweeping program of political, economic and social reforms.
NEWS
June 14, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the majority of people of this graceful city of canals, bridges and European architecture, the revolutionary name of Leningrad no longer described who they were and what they were about. St. Petersburg, the name the city's founder had given it nearly three centuries ago, proved closer to their spirit as the fervor of Soviet socialism waned. So they did something about it. Preliminary results showed Thursday that 55% of its 4.
NEWS
June 14, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the majority of people of this graceful city of canals, bridges and European architecture, the revolutionary name of Leningrad no longer described who they were and what they were about. St. Petersburg, the name the city's founder had given it nearly three centuries ago, proved closer to their spirit as the fervor of Soviet socialism waned. So they did something about it. Preliminary results showed Thursday that 55% of its 4.
NEWS
June 16, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A moderate reformer was elected the prime minister of the Soviet Union's Russian Republic on Friday after a radical proposed by Boris N. Yeltsin, the republic's populist president, was rejected. Ivan S. Silayev, 60, a Soviet deputy chairman in charge of the country's machine-tool and engineering industry, was elected with 163 votes from among the 239 deputies of the Russian Supreme Soviet, the republic's legislature, after Yeltsin withdrew his support from his own nominee in favor of Silayev.
NEWS
June 5, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Ukrainian Communist Party chief Vladimir Ivashko was elected president of the Soviet Union's second largest republic Monday after more than 100 radical deputies walked out of Parliament in protest. The independent Rukh news agency reported that Ivashko won the Ukraine's top government office by polling 278 votes to 52 against in the 450-seat Parliament.
NEWS
February 15, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev met serious resistance Wednesday in his bid for greater powers as liberal lawmakers criticized his plan for a Western-style, executive presidency and forced a postponement of the parliamentary session that would consider the required constitutional amendments.
NEWS
February 10, 1990
After reading "East Bloc's Fall Fans Flames of Ethnic Conflicts" (by Doyle McManus, Part A, Jan. 28), I have serious questions about how knowledgeable are those scholars, advisers, and think-tank experts our government relies on for accurate information concerning the developments in the Soviet Bloc. For starters, unnamed Bush Administration officials are quoted as saying that they are at a loss of "how to cope with a possible collapse of the Soviet Union as a single nation."
NEWS
February 9, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS and DAN FISHER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Soviet Communist Party reversed 70 years of history this week when its policy-making Central Committee voted after three days of heated debate to yield its constitutionally guaranteed monopoly on power. The action has raised a number of questions. Question: Why is the Soviet Communist Party giving up power? Answer: It really doesn't want to give up power.
NEWS
April 6, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A beaming Boris N. Yeltsin emerged victorious on Friday from a nine-day Congress session, which, instead of dumping him from the Russian leadership as conservatives had plotted, ended up granting him greater powers and bolstering his chances to become Russia's first popularly elected president.
NEWS
March 22, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
Lawmakers urged national and republic leaders on Thursday to use the recent referendum on preserving the union as a springboard to approving a new treaty joining the republics.
NEWS
March 19, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Mikhail S. Gorbachev appears to have won the mandate he wanted to preserve the Soviet Union as a federal state but far less convincingly than he had hoped, according to preliminary results Monday from the country's first national referendum. At the same time, Gorbachev's political rival Boris N.
NEWS
March 18, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviet citizens voted by the tens of millions Sunday in an unprecedented referendum on their country's future that for many was principally a ballot box showdown between President Mikhail S. Gorbachev and his radical rival, Boris N. Yeltsin. The growing antagonism between the two leaders, increasingly the focus of Soviet politics, was evident as they voted in the Soviet capital.
NEWS
March 17, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This country's future will be placed today in the hands of, among others, Alexander I. Demyensky, a ruddy-faced foreman at the sprawling shipyards here on the banks of the Dnieper River. With the hour of decision fast approaching, the 42-year-old Ukrainian, like many of his countrymen, was still puzzling over what to do.
NEWS
March 5, 1991 | From Associated Press
The 12-member European Community agreed in principle Monday to restore more than $1 billion in food aid to the Soviet Union. The aid was withheld after a bloody crackdown in the Baltic republics. The EC ministers issued a statement expressing satisfaction that Soviet authorities had not interfered with referendums held Sunday in Latvia and Estonia. Latvians and Estonians voted overwhelmingly for independence in the non-binding referendums; Lithuania did the same thing last month.
NEWS
April 16, 1990 | United Press International
A democratic faction has nominated Communist maverick Boris N. Yeltsin to run for president of the Russian Federation, the largest of the Soviet Union's 15 republics and a potential power base against President Mikhail S. Gorbachev. The president of the Russian Soviet Federated Socialist Republic will be chosen by the republic's 1,026-member Congress of People's Deputies when it convenes in Moscow on May 16 packed with radical legislators who won seats in last month's elections.
NEWS
July 11, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite sharp conservative criticism of his leadership, President Mikhail S. Gorbachev won reelection Tuesday as the general secretary of the Soviet Communist Party after telling delegates to a party congress that he will not slow or curtail his reforms and that they have too much momentum to be reversed. Gorbachev, 59, who has held the party's top post for the past five years, received 3,411 votes out of the 4,527 cast, and he welcomed the election as "support for my position."
NEWS
February 26, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet legislature, trying to brake burgeoning separatist movements throughout the country, on Monday voided actions by some republics that it said would have barred voter participation in the March 17 referendum on a new federal structure.
NEWS
February 7, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, struggling to hold his crisis-torn country together, appealed Wednesday for popular support in a national referendum on reconstituting the Soviet Union as a federal state and warned that its breakup would bring unimagined grief to all its people. Criticizing the Baltic republics of Lithuania and Estonia for their plans to hold separate plebiscites on independence, Gorbachev reaffirmed his intention to use all his power and authority to preserve the Soviet Union.
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