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Ussr Emigration

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NEWS
April 17, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration obtained advance support of American Jewish leaders before imposing new rules that had the effect of diverting most Soviet Jewish emigres from the United States to Israel, according to informed sources. Administration officials and Jewish leaders both said that the consultations defused what could have turned into a firestorm of controversy.
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NEWS
September 20, 1992 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Red and green pins dot the six-foot-wide map of the former Soviet Union--all spots where sizable Jewish communities remain, where economic collapse could bring political unrest and ethnic conflict but where Israel now has its own agents able to help the Jews to flee. "There must be the option for every Jew to leave and to come to Israel, and I can say now that there is," Baruch Gur, the head of the Jewish Agency's Eastern Europe department, declared with a sweep of his hand across the map.
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NEWS
February 19, 1989 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, Times Staff Writer
For a decade, this down-at-the-heels resort town northwest of Rome has served as a friendly staging point for emigre Soviet Jews headed to the United States. Now, with refugees arriving in unprecedented numbers, disillusionment washes Ladispoli's dour streets and polluted beaches. It is glasnost backlash.
NEWS
February 14, 1992 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although Israel and America have been wrangling over limits on construction in the West Bank and Gaza Strip, here in a burgeoning West Bank enclave representatives of Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir's ruling party on Thursday drove home the point that the settlements must and will grow. The officials made the pitch to new immigrants from the former Soviet Union--just the group that stands to gain most if Shamir and the Bush Administration reach an accord on the settlements.
NEWS
June 2, 1988 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, Times Staff Writer
Last month, on the eve of a U.S.-Soviet summit conference with human rights on the agenda, 1,145 Jewish emigres left the Soviet Union with visas for Israel. A total of 86 actually arrived here. The rest became what the Israeli government calls "dropouts," exchanging their immigrant invitations to Israel for refugee status in some other country once they had crossed the Soviet border. Most went to the United States.
NEWS
July 27, 1988
A five-man team of Israeli diplomats left for Moscow on a trip described by a Foreign Ministry official as a "major event." Yeshayahu Anug, deputy director of the Foreign Ministry, said the delegation's immediate purpose is to help process Israeli visas, both for Soviet Jews wishing to emigrate and those seeking to visit. The delegates traveled first to The Hague, where they are to pick up two-month Soviet visas before leaving Thursday for Moscow.
NEWS
July 30, 1990 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Housing Minister Ariel Sharon introduced his controversial housing plan for Soviet immigrants at a Cabinet meeting Sunday, but action was delayed because of opposition from Finance Minister Yitzhak Modai. Sharon proposed buying 50,000 mobile homes and 40,000 prefabricated houses in the next two years, calling on the government to build another 60,000 units each year over the next four years. Sharon's plan is mainly designed to accommodate Jewish immigrants from the Soviet Union.
NEWS
October 14, 1987 | DAVID VOREACOS, Times Staff Writer
The Soviet Union is violating international law by denying emigration to thousands of citizens on the grounds that they possess "state secrets," a Jewish organization said Tuesday in a report prepared for Secretary of State George P. Shultz. "The Soviet Union is alone among major developed states in routinely concluding that ordinary citizens possess 'state secrets' so as to justify preventing their leaving the country," said the report, released by the National Conference on Soviet Jewry.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 1990 | ELIZABETH TUCKER, Tucker is a Moscow-based writer .
She stands like a steel reed on the stage of the Bolshoi Conservatory, her tiny figure encased in gold lame, her mouth marked by a single streak of scarlet. Only her hands move, now flaying a violent chord, now lulling the violin almost to sleep. At intermission, the audience is ecstatic; fans rush the stage, shower her with flowers, even kneel at her feet and kiss her hand. At performance's end, after three encores, she is flooded with roses, tulips and carnations--more than 50 bouquets in all.
NEWS
September 4, 1989 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
New limits on the admission of Soviet refugees to the United States won't reduce the number of Soviet Jews coming to the United States but will maintain their admissions at roughly 33,000 per year, Bush Administration officials said Sunday. The Administration, swamped by applications from Soviet Jews, has tentatively decided to put a ceiling on Soviet refugee admissions to hold them at current levels, the officials said.
NEWS
December 29, 1991 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By Moscow standards, the rainy Israeli winter should barely bring on a sneeze, but in Irena Krutik's apartment--a converted chicken coop--the slicing wind and drippy ceilings are enough to send shivers through even a seasoned veteran of Russia's climate. "It's impossible to heat this room," said Krutik, wringing her hands to work up heat and work away frustration. "Five blankets aren't enough either."
NEWS
December 28, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
To applause and the jubilant sound of a ram's horn, a ship brought 477 Jews from the former Soviet Union to Israel in the first such trip by sea since the wave of immigration began two years ago. Four tugboats pulled the golden-hulled Greek vessel Mediterranean Sky into Haifa Bay as immigrants on the deck sought out relatives and loved ones gathered on shore.
NEWS
December 27, 1991 | From Reuters
The number of Soviet Jews who emigrated to Israel in 1991 was less than half the predicted total of 400,000, immigration officials said Thursday. The approximately 140,000 Soviet Jews who arrived in 1991 represented a drop of 23% from the 1990 figure, Absorption Minister Yitzhak Peretz said. He noted that 20,000 immigrants were airlifted from Ethiopia in 1991, more than 14,000 of them in one 36-hour period during the civil war in that African nation.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 1991 | NORMAN LEBRECHT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Lebrecht is a free-lance writer based in London
In the most sweeping musical emigration since the Russian Revolution of 1917, many of the country's top composers have fled a collapsing society for more hospitable lands. Among the latest to join the ranks of fleeing musicians were two leading young composers, Dmitri Smirnov and Elena Firsova, a married couple whose home was the center of Moscow's contemporary music scene.
NEWS
December 24, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A bomb exploded in Hungary as a busload of 28 Soviet Jews passed by on their way to the Budapest airport for a plane to Israel. Authorities said two police escorts were injured and that Arabs were believed responsible for the blast. Reports conflicted on whether any emigres were injured in the attack, the first major incident targeting Jewish emigres in Eastern Europe since they were allowed to pass through former East Bloc nations two years ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 1991 | LYNN SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Among the thousands of Orange County Jews who began to celebrate the eight days of Hanukkah on Sunday, some will have a special appreciation for the festival's theme of religious freedom. They are Jewish emigres from the Soviet Union, some of whom may be celebrating Hanukkah for the first time, Jewish leaders said. "Many have never heard Hanukkah songs, a Hanukkah prayer or the Hanukkah story," said Shula Kalir-Merton, cantor at Temple Beth El in Laguna Niguel.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 1988 | ESTHER SCHRADER, Times Staff Writer
State Department officials have cautioned service agencies that 3,400 Soviet Armenian immigrants expected to settle in Los Angeles between now and October may find it more difficult to gain refugee status than previous immigrants and will receive less government assistance when they arrive.
NEWS
February 19, 1989 | MATHIS CHAZANOV and ESTHER SCHRADER, Times Staff Writers
Refugee resettlement efforts in Southern California are about to be overwhelmed by thousands of Jews and Armenians who are backed up in Italy and the Soviet Union waiting for permission to enter the United States. "There is just not enough money and services to serve these people in an expeditious way," said Bruce Whipple, director of the Los Angeles office of the nonprofit International Rescue Committee, which helps find jobs, housing and language training for refugees.
NEWS
November 28, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Already concerned about the spread of nuclear, chemical and biological weapons, Moscow now fears that unemployed experts from its military industries might be lured to work in other countries, the new head of the Soviet intelligence agency said on Wednesday. Yevgeny M. Primakov, director of the Soviet Central Intelligence Service, said that he has discussed the problem with U.S.
NEWS
November 9, 1991 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hands folded, the little family matriarch lifted her head slightly and began to count. There was her husband, her son, his wife and their three children. There was another son, a daughter and seven more grandchildren. "We're all going together," concluded Lydia Stahlbaum, who works in the office of the local collective farm in this town in Kazakhstan. "I think we will be in Germany by spring."
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