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Ussr Espionage

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April 13, 1987 | ROBERT GILLETTE, Times Staff Writer
It was one of the more dramatic moments in the modern history of electronic counterespionage. U.S. Ambassador to Moscow George F. Kennan sat in the study of his ornate residence in 1952 and read aloud what he hoped the KGB, listening through a device suspected of being hidden somewhere in the room, would believe was an authentic message to Washington. As Kennan read, two technicians scurried about with their detection instruments, homing in on a radio bug like excited hounds on the scent.
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NEWS
December 21, 1989 | From Associated Press
Secretary of State James A. Baker III notified Congress on Wednesday that a U.S. Embassy office building in Moscow will be torn down and a new one built, at a cost estimated at perhaps $500 million. The decision, under consideration for months, was based on the U.S. intelligence conclusion that the Soviets had planted eavesdropping devices in the walls during the building's construction. The devices were first detected in 1979. The U.S.
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NEWS
November 30, 1989 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although East-West tensions have eased remarkably with the revolution in the East Bloc, the Soviet Union has stepped up its spying activities against the United States and other Western nations and is trying harder than ever to recruit U.S. agents, CIA Director William H. Webster warned Wednesday.
NEWS
November 30, 1989 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although East-West tensions have eased remarkably with the revolution in the East Bloc, the Soviet Union has stepped up its spying activities against the United States and other Western nations and is trying harder than ever to recruit U.S. agents, CIA Director William H. Webster warned Wednesday.
NEWS
December 21, 1989 | From Associated Press
Secretary of State James A. Baker III notified Congress on Wednesday that a U.S. Embassy office building in Moscow will be torn down and a new one built, at a cost estimated at perhaps $500 million. The decision, under consideration for months, was based on the U.S. intelligence conclusion that the Soviets had planted eavesdropping devices in the walls during the building's construction. The devices were first detected in 1979. The U.S.
NEWS
April 13, 1987 | ROBERT GILLETTE, Times Staff Writer
It was one of the more dramatic moments in the modern history of electronic counterespionage. U.S. Ambassador to Moscow George F. Kennan sat in the study of his ornate residence in 1952 and read aloud what he hoped the KGB, listening through a device suspected of being hidden somewhere in the room, would believe was an authentic message to Washington. As Kennan read, two technicians scurried about with their detection instruments, homing in on a radio bug like excited hounds on the scent.
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