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NEWS
June 21, 1990 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush said Wednesday that he is willing to discuss new European proposals to provide massive Western aid to the Soviet Union but warned that he will not be ready to support such an effort until Moscow makes needed economic reforms and ends its aid to Cuba.
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NEWS
December 22, 1991 | JOEL HAVEMANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States and Western Europe toned down their bickering over aid to the former Soviet Union on Saturday, but they remained hopelessly deadlocked on sputtering international trade talks. At the semiannual meeting of top-level U.S.
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NEWS
June 27, 1990 | From Associated Press
Western European leaders Tuesday signaled support for Mikhail S. Gorbachev's efforts to rescue his ailing Soviet economy but fended off a Franco-German push for an immediate $15-billion aid package. The leaders of the 12-nation trading bloc ended a two-day summit by asking aides to consult with the Kremlin about urgent proposals for immediate loans and longer term assistance.
NEWS
December 19, 1991 | DOYLE McMANUS and KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Bush Administration's call for an international conference on aiding the Commonwealth of Independent States--the supposed centerpiece of a more dynamic American approach to the crumbling Soviet Union--has failed to catch fire and could become a minor embarrassment, U.S. officials and foreign diplomats said Wednesday. Many of the allied governments that will be asked to attend have been polite but unenthusiastic. A few have been openly critical.
NEWS
June 26, 1990 | Associated Press
European Community leaders Monday rejected a French and West German proposal for a $15-billion aid package for the Soviet Union and instead ordered a study of that country's economic needs, officials reported. Officials of all the major community nations reported there was unanimous agreement on a general desire to help the Soviet Union. But the view pressed by Britain and Denmark that large-scale handouts are not the right approach appears to have prevailed.
NEWS
December 16, 1990 | JOEL HAVEMANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Europe's leaders took giant strides toward political as well as economic unity Saturday and, as if to underscore their determination, jointly lifted a ban on investment in South Africa, demanded Iraq's withdrawal from Kuwait and provided $1 billion in food aid to the Soviet Union. The heads of the 12 European Community nations struck only one sour note, on international trade.
NEWS
November 22, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even as the leaders of Europe pronounced the Cold War over and the dangers posed by four decades of East-West rivalry ended with the signing of the new Charter of Paris on Wednesday, they saw a new threat rising--that of instability in the Soviet Union.
NEWS
August 24, 1991 | From Reuters
British Prime Minister John Major plans to convene a meeting soon of top officials of the Group of Seven major industrial democracies on aid for the Soviet Union, British officials said Friday. Major's office said the prime minister, current G-7 chairman, took the initiative Thursday, suggesting a meeting next week of the officials. A spokesman said replies from all the G-7 members are still awaited and a venue will be decided later.
NEWS
August 22, 1991 | JAMES RISEN and SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Responding to pressures from Congress and European allies, the Bush Administration plans a massive increase in food and humanitarian assistance to the Soviet Union to show support for President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's restored government, Administration officials said Wednesday. President Bush, moving quickly to provide a gesture of political backing for Gorbachev and Russian President Boris N.
NEWS
August 20, 1991 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The conservative coup that ousted Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev has brought to a sudden halt wide-ranging international efforts to integrate the Soviet Union into the modern global economy. On Monday, senior officials in the United States and other major Western powers issued warnings that they are likely to freeze current Soviet aid programs, as well as their plans to expand trade and investment ties with Moscow, if the coup brings democratic reforms to an end.
NEWS
October 28, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pressured by Western creditors, the bulk of the Soviet republics have agreed in principle to divide up the nation's wealth--from diamonds to embassies abroad--as part of an ambitious plan to pay off $65 billion in foreign debt and obtain huge new credits, officials said Sunday. News of the Ukrainian-brokered accord came from a meeting in a swank Moscow hotel between leaders of the republics and envoys from the Group of Seven major industrial democracies.
NEWS
October 14, 1991 | KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States, despite its warnings that a new economic crisis could be looming for the Soviet Union, was rebuffed Sunday in its efforts to persuade its key Western allies and Japan to provide debt relief to Moscow.
NEWS
October 8, 1991 | JOEL HAVEMANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
European Community finance ministers Monday approved about $2.4 billion in emergency food and medical aid to the Soviet Union, an amount that falls short of what Soviet officials say they will need to make it through the winter. The finance ministers, whose action still needs final approval by the 12 EC governments, called for equal contributions from North America and from Japan. That would produce a total aid package of $7.2 billion, compared with the $10.
NEWS
October 2, 1991 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Foreign Minister Boris D. Pankin promised Tuesday that the Soviet Union will eventually give "a dramatic response" to President Bush's nuclear disarmament proposals after a series of technical meetings that will begin in the next 10 days. A flurry of missions seemed in prospect as the State Department announced that it will send a mission to Moscow in the next few days and Pankin said that Deputy Foreign Minister Alexei A. Obukhov will meet in Washington Oct.
NEWS
September 20, 1991 | KAREN TUMULTY and JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Soviet Union, warning that it faces potentially severe food shortages as another bitter winter approaches, Thursday doubled the amount it is asking for emergency food aid from the West. Moscow's $14.7-billion request, almost six times what the European Community initially had estimated the Soviets would need, clearly caught Western leaders off guard. The latest aid request renewed potentially troubling questions about precisely who will assist the Soviets and how that will be done.
NEWS
September 13, 1991 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet Union has given the United States and its allies a specific list of emergency food aid it will need to avoid a famine this winter, and Western governments have concluded that they can--and will--meet the Soviet needs, Agriculture Secretary Edward R. Madigan has announced. He declined to provide details about the Soviet request, handed to U.S. Agriculture Department officials now traveling through the Soviet republics to assess the food outlook for the winter.
NEWS
June 7, 1991 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III, in the Bush Administration's most detailed response yet to Soviet pleas for Western economic aid, warned Thursday that Moscow must enact major political and legal reforms before the United States will help reshape its moribund economy.
NEWS
June 1, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush, apparently concerned that the harsh comments of his top aides might undercut Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, said Friday that he is "very impressed" with a Soviet economic reform plan that other Administration officials had written off as inadequate. "We want to try to be helpful where we can," Bush said.
BUSINESS
September 11, 1991 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Will the Russians and Ukrainians, Uzbeks and Armenians and all the other peoples of the Union of formerly Soviet, formerly Socialist, Republics go hungry this winter? No, probably not. But that's the fear among Western governments. President Bush in June authorized $1.5 billion in emergency loan guarantees so the Soviets could buy U.S. grain and food supplies. About $600 million of those guarantees have been taken up by European banks financing Soviet purchases of U.S.
NEWS
September 5, 1991 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a major foreign policy address, German Chancellor Helmut Kohl called Wednesday on other Western nations to increase economic aid to the Soviet Union, declaring the success of major reforms there "lies in the interest of the West as a whole." "This huge task cannot be left to us Germans alone, or just to the Europeans," Kohl said in his speech to a crowded parliamentary session in Bonn.
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