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NEWS
September 11, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Warning that global stability is at risk if his reforms fail, Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev appealed to the West on Tuesday for aid to cement the building of a "great Eurasian democracy." In his first address to an international forum after three tumultuous weeks that have reshaped the map of Europe and the future of the Soviet Union, Gorbachev praised Western leaders for rushing to his side "at a crucial moment"--last month's aborted coup against him.
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NEWS
November 22, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an effort to rescue the Soviet Union from an immediate financial collapse, the world's leading industrial nations agreed Thursday to lend the Soviets $1 billion immediately and to defer the repayment of more than $3.6 billion in debts. But the deputy finance ministers of the Group of Seven nations made further foreign assistance conditional on Soviet implementation of radical economic reforms under the supervision of the International Monetary Fund.
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NEWS
July 8, 1990 | ART PINE and TOM REDBURN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Bush Administration signaled Saturday that it will not object if Japan resumes billions of dollars worth of lending to China, even though Washington technically still favors continuing the economic sanctions that the allies imposed on Beijing in 1989. The modified U.S.
NEWS
November 20, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The world's richest industrialized nations, struggling to shore up the collapsing Soviet economy, on Tuesday offered Moscow an aid package worth several billion dollars, including new credits and a freeze on interest payments on its crushing foreign debt. But Russian Federation President Boris N.
NEWS
July 11, 1990 | JACK NELSON, TIMES WASHINGTON BUREAU CHIEF
The United States and its major allies, seeking common ground on the issue of aid to the Soviet Union, agreed Tuesday to send an international team of experts to study that nation's failing economy and find ways to help Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev move toward a free market system. At the same time, U.S.
NEWS
August 31, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
Deputy finance ministers of the Group of Seven industrial nations sought common ground Friday as they reassessed aid to the Soviet Union in response to the tumultuous changes of the last two weeks. Few details of the meeting at the Ministry of Finance leaked out. The participants included U.S. Assistant Treasury Secretary David A. Mulford and Tadao Chino, Japan's new vice minister of finance.
NEWS
August 30, 1991 | Associated Press
British Prime Minister John Major's suggested options for aid to the Soviet Union: Extend existing food credits. Assess the need for food aid this winter. Send "lifeline" teams to the Soviet Union to provide assistance in establishing efficient food production and distribution systems. Implement existing know-how programs on technical aid discussed by the G-7 group of industrialized nations and other bilateral programs.
NEWS
August 30, 1991 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet Union and its republics surely need a helping hand. But whether help from the West will do much good is an open question. The Soviet economy is in disarray, and getting aid to the people will be tough. Food has to be shipped efficiently; cash may well go to waste; technical advice doesn't work quickly. And then there's the question of who to deal with: the central government, the republics, private groups or entrepreneurs?
NEWS
August 30, 1991 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush appealed to Moscow on Thursday to minimize the danger that the turmoil in the Soviet Union might leave its nuclear weapons in unstable hands, saying that he wants the Soviets to ensure that the safety of their atomic arsenal is "totally guaranteed." "The last thing the world needs is a nuclear scare," Bush said.
NEWS
July 18, 1991
The developments: As the 17th annual summit came to a close, the leaders of the seven largest industrial democracies gave their political support to President Mikhail S. Gorbachev in his efforts to transform his nation into a democracy and a market-oriented economy. But they stopped short of pledging massive economic aid. President Bush and Gorbachev also reached agreement on the long-awaited Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty and announced plans for a summit in Moscow on July 30-31.
NEWS
October 11, 1991 | KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet Union will make its case for aid this weekend with top economic officials of the leading industrial nations, but it is unlikely to come away with anything more bankable than sympathy and encouragement, U.S. officials indicated Thursday. "I wouldn't look at this particular meeting as a watershed," U.S. Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan told reporters traveling with him. Instead, Greenspan said, it is part of "an ongoing . . .
NEWS
October 4, 1991 | KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Western governments are considering temporary measures to help the Soviet Union through a looming debt crisis, sources said Thursday, but a top U.S. official insisted that forgiving the loans permanently is out of the question. The issue is likely to dominate a meeting in Bangkok, Thailand, later this month between Soviet officials and the so-called Group of Seven.
NEWS
October 2, 1991 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Foreign Minister Boris D. Pankin promised Tuesday that the Soviet Union will eventually give "a dramatic response" to President Bush's nuclear disarmament proposals after a series of technical meetings that will begin in the next 10 days. A flurry of missions seemed in prospect as the State Department announced that it will send a mission to Moscow in the next few days and Pankin said that Deputy Foreign Minister Alexei A. Obukhov will meet in Washington Oct.
NEWS
September 11, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Warning that global stability is at risk if his reforms fail, Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev appealed to the West on Tuesday for aid to cement the building of a "great Eurasian democracy." In his first address to an international forum after three tumultuous weeks that have reshaped the map of Europe and the future of the Soviet Union, Gorbachev praised Western leaders for rushing to his side "at a crucial moment"--last month's aborted coup against him.
NEWS
September 1, 1991 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States and its major Western allies are considering a plan to require Moscow and breakaway Soviet republics to make deep cuts in their nuclear forces as a condition of future economic assistance, according to Administration officials Saturday. The new push to link arms control and aid reflects an effort to seize what officials believe is a crucial opportunity to secure stability from the tumult surrounding the breakup of the Soviet Union.
NEWS
August 31, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
Deputy finance ministers of the Group of Seven industrial nations sought common ground Friday as they reassessed aid to the Soviet Union in response to the tumultuous changes of the last two weeks. Few details of the meeting at the Ministry of Finance leaked out. The participants included U.S. Assistant Treasury Secretary David A. Mulford and Tadao Chino, Japan's new vice minister of finance.
NEWS
July 18, 1991 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
European delegates attending the economic summit agreed Wednesday that Europe, the United States and Canada have developed a reassuring capacity for pulling together, rather than apart as some had feared only a few months ago. The economic summit was "friendly and frank," according to the host, British Prime Minister John Major. "There was very strenuous discussion on a number of aspects of it. People did speak their minds clearly, comprehensively and on occasion in an unforgettable way."
NEWS
July 18, 1991 | DOYLE McMANUS and JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
It took only 15 minutes to reach final agreement on the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty on Wednesday, but the handshake deal allowed President Bush and Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev to talk about the subject that was really on their minds: remaking the Soviet economy.
NEWS
August 30, 1991 | Associated Press
British Prime Minister John Major's suggested options for aid to the Soviet Union: Extend existing food credits. Assess the need for food aid this winter. Send "lifeline" teams to the Soviet Union to provide assistance in establishing efficient food production and distribution systems. Implement existing know-how programs on technical aid discussed by the G-7 group of industrialized nations and other bilateral programs.
NEWS
August 30, 1991 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet Union and its republics surely need a helping hand. But whether help from the West will do much good is an open question. The Soviet economy is in disarray, and getting aid to the people will be tough. Food has to be shipped efficiently; cash may well go to waste; technical advice doesn't work quickly. And then there's the question of who to deal with: the central government, the republics, private groups or entrepreneurs?
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