Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUssr Foreign Aid Third World
IN THE NEWS

Ussr Foreign Aid Third World

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 21, 1990 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's not just on the plains of Europe that the Cold War is winding down. From Syria to Nicaragua and Ethiopia to Vietnam, the Soviet Union is pulling back. Bent on saving money and removing burrs from its relations with Washington, Moscow is pushing client states toward conciliation more often than conflict these days. "It seems clear that (Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 21, 1990 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's not just on the plains of Europe that the Cold War is winding down. From Syria to Nicaragua and Ethiopia to Vietnam, the Soviet Union is pulling back. Bent on saving money and removing burrs from its relations with Washington, Moscow is pushing client states toward conciliation more often than conflict these days. "It seems clear that (Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A.
Advertisement
NEWS
March 28, 1988 | From Reuters
Soviet delegates to an international conference on development said Sunday that Moscow will increase aid to the Third World, reversing a longstanding policy of blaming capitalism alone for world poverty. "Our role in Third World development projects is less than it should be. We aim to correct this," said Vladimir Khoros, head of the Soviet delegation attending a conference here organized by the Society for International Development, a Rome-based non-governmental group of about 50 countries.
NEWS
December 8, 1988 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, in a dramatic move to give new momentum to long-stalled arms negotiations, announced Wednesday that the Soviet Union will unilaterally reduce its armed forces by half a million men and withdraw thousands of troops and tanks from Eastern Europe. Gorbachev, addressing the U.N.
NEWS
December 27, 1987 | Associated Press
The Soviet Union sharply increased its aid to Third World allies in 1987 but is making new demands for efficiency, according to an internal document of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. In a confidential report obtained this month by the Associated Press, the organization ranked the Soviet Union as the world's fourth-largest donor of development aid, after the United States, Britain and France.
NEWS
December 8, 1988 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, in a dramatic move to give new momentum to long-stalled arms negotiations, announced Wednesday that the Soviet Union will unilaterally reduce its armed forces by half a million men and withdraw thousands of troops and tanks from Eastern Europe. Gorbachev, addressing the U.N.
NEWS
March 28, 1988 | From Reuters
Soviet delegates to an international conference on development said Sunday that Moscow will increase aid to the Third World, reversing a longstanding policy of blaming capitalism alone for world poverty. "Our role in Third World development projects is less than it should be. We aim to correct this," said Vladimir Khoros, head of the Soviet delegation attending a conference here organized by the Society for International Development, a Rome-based non-governmental group of about 50 countries.
NEWS
December 27, 1987 | Associated Press
The Soviet Union sharply increased its aid to Third World allies in 1987 but is making new demands for efficiency, according to an internal document of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. In a confidential report obtained this month by the Associated Press, the organization ranked the Soviet Union as the world's fourth-largest donor of development aid, after the United States, Britain and France.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|