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NEWS
December 29, 1991 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian leaders, alarmed that their nation has slipped so drastically behind the West, throw open the doors to foreign consultants. Sound familiar? Actually, the 1980s surge in East-West business ties is a footnote to a much larger--if little-known--story of how Americans helped build the modern Soviet Union before the Cold War, setting up steel mills, auto plants, machine factories, the very basis of its military-industrial might.
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BUSINESS
April 10, 1990 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Officials of the United States and 41 other countries ironed out their last major differences over the proposed East European development bank Monday, clearing the way for final approval of the new institution as early as next month.
BUSINESS
August 23, 1991 | DENISE GELLENE and CRISTINA LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In the euphoria after the defeat of the Soviet coup plotters, there were signs Thursday that the pathways of commerce in the Soviet Union are changing. With the Soviet republics asserting themselves politically, their leaders' role in closing business deals seems to be ascending, U.S. business executives said. Robert L. Schwartz, president of Los Angeles-based International Development Corp.
BUSINESS
March 28, 1990 | JAMES FLANIGAN
What's the connection between Soviet soldiers in Lithuania and bankers in Frankfurt, London, Tokyo and New York? Simply this: The bankers may be the most effective restraint on the troops, because if the Soviet army takes to shooting Lithuanians, the Soviet Union can kiss its credit rating and its economy goodby. The Soviet Union has been borrowing heavily--$6 billion last year and $6 billion in 1988--and it now owes $49 billion to Western banks.
NEWS
May 30, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime Minister Valentin S. Pavlov introduced radical legislation Wednesday that would let foreign investors operate and own businesses in the Soviet Union as part of the nation's sweeping economic reforms. Only with massive injections of foreign capital--and the advanced technology and business know-how that such investment would bring--can the Soviet Union hope to modernize its industry and thus stem its economic collapse, Pavlov told the Supreme Soviet, the national legislature.
NEWS
June 9, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What will the bill for perestroika be--$100 billion, $150 billion, $250 billion? Perhaps even more? Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev is preparing the account that he will render next month to leaders of the West's major industrialized nations, and the sum by any reckoning will be large.
NEWS
July 6, 1991 | From Associated Press
The nation's legislature, the Supreme Soviet, enacted a long-awaited law on foreign investment Friday, strengthening legal guarantees and offering concessions to attract capital from abroad. The measure, approved by a vote of 340 to 11 with 11 abstentions, provides an important legal foundation for President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's plans to revamp the economy with Western aid, investment and management know-how.
BUSINESS
May 26, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two or three years ago, Soviet-Western joint ventures were so hot that foreigners here joked about the emergence of a new form of Russian greeting: "Hello! My name is Ivan. Would you like to start a joint venture with me?" Entrepreneurs on the prowl crammed Moscow's hotels, and government officials touted joint ventures as the best way to let Western investment flow into the troubled Soviet economy without selling out the Motherland to greedy capitalists.
NEWS
August 6, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They said George Cohon couldn't do it. They said it at every step along the way. Back in 1976, when the ebullient president of McDonald's Restaurants of Canada first broached the notion of opening a branch in the Soviet Union, the skeptics said he could never cut a deal with the grim authorities in Moscow.
NEWS
July 14, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To the West, Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev will be seeking tens of billions of dollars--maybe $100 billion, maybe $200 billion all told--to revamp his country's collapsing economy when he meets this week with leaders of the Group of Seven in London. To his increasingly angry critics at home, the Soviet president will be selling off the country's wealth, mortgaging its natural resources for Western credits and, in the process, abandoning the ideals of socialism for crass capitalism.
NEWS
July 13, 1991 | KAREN TUMULTY and CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, preparing for a key economic meeting with Western leaders in London, sent President Bush a letter signaling that he has embraced open markets and other painful reforms for his country's crippled economy, U.S. officials said Friday. While it offered little in the way of fresh ideas or detailed prescriptions for change, the letter seemed to have reassured U.S.
NEWS
July 10, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev said Tuesday that he will not be seeking economic assistance when he meets leaders of the Group of Seven, the West's major industrial nations, in London next week--but will be looking for foreign investment in his country.
NEWS
July 6, 1991 | From Associated Press
The nation's legislature, the Supreme Soviet, enacted a long-awaited law on foreign investment Friday, strengthening legal guarantees and offering concessions to attract capital from abroad. The measure, approved by a vote of 340 to 11 with 11 abstentions, provides an important legal foundation for President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's plans to revamp the economy with Western aid, investment and management know-how.
NEWS
June 9, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What will the bill for perestroika be--$100 billion, $150 billion, $250 billion? Perhaps even more? Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev is preparing the account that he will render next month to leaders of the West's major industrialized nations, and the sum by any reckoning will be large.
NEWS
October 6, 1990 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In his next move to revive the Soviet economy, President Mikhail S. Gorbachev will soon issue a decree creating incentives to attract capital from abroad, allowing full foreign ownership of companies here, his top economic advisers said Friday. Another decree, establishing a banking system modeled on the U.S. Federal Reserve System, is also expected soon, Western diplomats said.
NEWS
July 13, 1991 | KAREN TUMULTY and CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, preparing for a key economic meeting with Western leaders in London, sent President Bush a letter signaling that he has embraced open markets and other painful reforms for his country's crippled economy, U.S. officials said Friday. While it offered little in the way of fresh ideas or detailed prescriptions for change, the letter seemed to have reassured U.S.
NEWS
May 30, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime Minister Valentin S. Pavlov introduced radical legislation Wednesday that would let foreign investors operate and own businesses in the Soviet Union as part of the nation's sweeping economic reforms. Only with massive injections of foreign capital--and the advanced technology and business know-how that such investment would bring--can the Soviet Union hope to modernize its industry and thus stem its economic collapse, Pavlov told the Supreme Soviet, the national legislature.
NEWS
May 30, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A multimillion-dollar deal involving San Francisco-based Chevron Corp. surfaced as a potentially explosive issue in the Russian presidential campaign Wednesday when a progressive weekly denounced it as a sellout of Soviet natural resources that may be tainted by corruption. The "deal of the century" to develop the vast Tengiz oil field has terms so poor for the Soviet Union that it is "unprecedented for our times," Moscow News charged.
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