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NEWS
April 21, 1988 | NIKKI FINKE, Times Staff Writer
H eeeeeeeeeeeere's Gennady! Live and in person and peering out the window of an Amtrak car rumbling from San Diego to Los Angeles, the chief of information for the Soviet Foreign Ministry is musing about the brouhaha over Larry Speakes, his one-time counterpart as superpower mouthpiece. "Yes, I was surprised that he revealed he had made up quotes for President Reagan, and I feel sorry for him because he lost his job of $300,000," Gerasimov explains.
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NEWS
June 6, 1992 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
New statements by top Russian officials Friday appear to show that the Soviet Communist Party continued to supply funds and arms to terrorists until as recently as last year, even though then-President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, the party's leader, had long espoused a policy of cooperation with the West. "These groups, for example, were ready to demolish pipelines or kill American businessmen or British or others . . .
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NEWS
July 5, 1989 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, beginning a three-day visit to France, called Tuesday for major new initiatives by both East and West to accelerate disarmament and to build what he calls a "common European home." Gorbachev, relentless in his foreign policy initiatives, proposed an all-European summit to mark the conclusion of an expected agreement reducing the conventional armed forces--a pact that would fundamentally alter the long confrontation between East and West.
NEWS
September 15, 1991 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Barely one month ago, a 40-year-old Russian with a shy, boyish smile was ushered quietly into the Washington offices of Secretary of State James A. Baker III for a deliberately low-key meeting. The visitor was Andrei V. Kozyrev, foreign minister of the Russian Federation, largest of the 15 republics that then constituted the Soviet Union.
NEWS
August 2, 1990 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III and Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze concluded two days of talks in the Siberian city of Irkutsk today by agreeing on the importance of Soviet and American cooperation in Asia. "In Asia, too, the Soviet Union and the United States do not regard each other as adversaries," Shevardnadze told reporters during a news conference after the talks. The U.S.
BUSINESS
July 26, 1990 | From Associated Press
De Beers tightened its grip on the global diamond market Wednesday with an exclusive five-year deal to sell the Soviet Union's rough diamond output, which could total more than $5 billion. The financially strained Soviet Union, among the world's biggest gem diamond producers, will get a $1-billion advance against future diamond sales. De Beers' London-based marketing arm, the Central Selling Organization, will strengthen its position as the world's dominant diamond seller.
NEWS
June 3, 1990 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Washington summit, the first superpower meeting of the post-Cold War era, has seen relations between the United States and the Soviet Union begin a historic transformation--away from almost half a century of frozen enmity toward an active willingness to help each other. The two countries still have major differences over several fundamental issues.
NEWS
March 19, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
The Soviet Union and Yugoslavia pledged on Friday to respect the right of all Communist parties to choose their own paths, saying they have no intention of imposing their systems on anyone. Analysts said the declaration, in a joint statement at the end of a visit to Yugoslavia by Kremlin leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev, formally invalidated the so-called Brezhnev Doctrine of limited sovereignty that justified Soviet intervention if Communist states deviated from the path mapped by the Kremlin.
NEWS
August 10, 1990 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet Union called Thursday for concerted U.N. action to halt Iraqi aggression in the Persian Gulf and said it is ready to immediately begin consultations to that end with the world organization's military leaders. Although a Kremlin official, as had been expected, flatly ruled out Soviet participation in U.S.
NEWS
August 9, 1990 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet Union gave tacit approval Wednesday to President Bush's order sending U.S. troops and warplanes to halt further aggression by Iraq but shied away from any hint that its armed forces might join in the multinational military action. The trade embargo against Iraq decreed by the U.N. Security Council is "a more effective weapon to halt aggression than all the armed might Washington is deploying in the Persian Gulf," commentator V.
NEWS
September 6, 1991 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Newly appointed Soviet Foreign Minister Boris N. Pankin on Thursday stressed continuity in foreign policy but left little doubt that as the country itself takes new shape, so too will the substance and conduct of its foreign affairs.
NEWS
September 5, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III, in his first detailed assessment of the failed coup in the Soviet Union, said Wednesday that he will go to Moscow next week to seek answers about control of Soviet nuclear weapons and Moscow's capacity to cooperate with Washington on Mideast peace and other issues. He said he also hopes to visit Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania to dramatize U.S. recognition of the independence of the Baltic states.
NEWS
March 16, 1991 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev and Secretary of State James A. Baker III failed to break a logjam in arms control talks Friday and disagreed over whether the United States is free to use military force in Iraq. But they still expressed confidence that U.S.-Soviet relations are slowly improving after what Gorbachev called "an uneasy period."
NEWS
February 23, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At 2:23 p.m. Friday, the English-language Tass newsprinter spit out a message that ignited near-panic in newsrooms all over town: Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev would be meeting the press in about an hour and a half. Correspondents starved for information about the final outcome of last-minute Soviet-Iraqi diplomacy sped through Moscow's slushy streets to the Foreign Ministry press center.
NEWS
February 23, 1991 | ROBIN WRIGHT and MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The surprise peace proposal unveiled by the Kremlin on Thursday was in fact a joint effort by the Soviet Union and Iran--a diplomatic odd-coupling of two of Washington's oldest foes with potential consequences that stretch well beyond the war in the Persian Gulf. The extraordinary cooperation between Moscow and Tehran was brought on by a shared anxiety over U.S. diplomatic gains and long-term intentions in the Persian Gulf.
NEWS
February 23, 1991 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Concerned about the fate of Mikhail S. Gorbachev as a key element in future U.S.-Soviet relations, U.S. analysts say they are puzzled by the Soviet president's attempt to play peacemaker in the Persian Gulf. The effort, fraught with pitfalls, risks his ties to the Western nations he needs to help rebuild his shattered economy, they say.
NEWS
June 2, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When last December's Malta summit ended, both President Bush and Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev complained that their talks had been cut too short by the storms that had nearly drowned the island. Hours of meeting time had had to be scrubbed from what Bush had foreseen as an informal, "feet up," summit. This time, both presidents say, things will be different. "This is the first time that the President of the United States and I will have enough time to reflect on and discuss . . .
NEWS
June 27, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A major dispute within the Soviet Communist Party over "who lost Eastern Europe" broke into the open Tuesday with Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze and Defense Minister Dmitri T. Yazov facing off in pungent newspaper interviews in advance of a crucial party congress scheduled for next week.
NEWS
January 15, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, the issues in the Persian Gulf crisis are clear and beyond challenge: Iraq occupied its neighbor Kuwait against all international laws, and under an unprecedented series of United Nations resolutions the world community is demanding that Iraq withdraw--or face eviction by military force. But a curious debate has developed in Soviet politics around the government's position. Should the Soviet Union participate in that armed action?
NEWS
December 22, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration, alarmed by the dramatic resignation of Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze, Friday launched a reassessment of its policy toward Moscow despite mounting evidence that the United States has very little room to maneuver. "It is a tough situation for the U.S. government," a State Department official said. "We can only do so much in the Soviet Union--it is a big place. It is not like Poland," which is of more manageable size.
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