Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUssr Foreign Policy Middle East
IN THE NEWS

Ussr Foreign Policy Middle East

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 24, 1988 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
The Reagan Administration, in a sharp break with a longstanding American policy of trying to minimize Soviet influence in the Middle East, is urging Moscow to help mediate the Arab-Israeli conflict, a step that could require the Soviets to make the same sort of controversial choices that the United States frequently has had to make in recent years. Frustrated Administration officials maintain that Soviet leader Mikhail S.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 5, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Russia the conciliator." The phrase was originally suggested by an adviser to one of the Arab delegations at the Middle East peace conference here last week, and Vladimir Lukin, a member of the Soviet delegation, was clearly savoring it. "It's a new role for us, but a good one," said Lukin, chairman of the Foreign Affairs Committee of the Russian Federation's Parliament.
Advertisement
NEWS
May 27, 1988 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writers
With the Soviet evacuation of Afghanistan giving President Reagan the first dramatic success for his policy of backing anti-communist insurgencies in the Third World, American strategists hope to make the once-neglected subject of regional conflicts into a centerpiece for the Moscow summit. And for once, U.S. hopes may run parallel to the thinking in Moscow. Kremlin leader Mikhail S.
NEWS
December 16, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet Union, in a substantial policy shift, no longer ties the establishment of diplomatic relations with Israel to Jerusalem's participation in a Middle East peace conference, a Soviet Foreign Ministry spokesman acknowledged Saturday. Vitaly I. Churkin, the ministry's chief spokesman, said that the Soviet Union now attaches no conditions to full diplomatic relations with Israel but cautioned that "this does not mean it will happen tomorrow." Although Eduard A.
NEWS
December 16, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet Union, in a substantial policy shift, no longer ties the establishment of diplomatic relations with Israel to Jerusalem's participation in a Middle East peace conference, a Soviet Foreign Ministry spokesman acknowledged Saturday. Vitaly I. Churkin, the ministry's chief spokesman, said that the Soviet Union now attaches no conditions to full diplomatic relations with Israel but cautioned that "this does not mean it will happen tomorrow." Although Eduard A.
NEWS
November 5, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Russia the conciliator." The phrase was originally suggested by an adviser to one of the Arab delegations at the Middle East peace conference here last week, and Vladimir Lukin, a member of the Soviet delegation, was clearly savoring it. "It's a new role for us, but a good one," said Lukin, chairman of the Foreign Affairs Committee of the Russian Federation's Parliament.
NEWS
April 20, 1988 | ROBERT C. TOTH, Times Staff Writer
Officials traveling with Secretary of State George P. Shultz to Moscow this week will be looking for signs that the Soviets, in the wake of their Afghanistan withdrawal, will be intent on taking a strategic initiative in foreign affairs to ease their Afghan defeat. Some Reagan Administration officials are drawing a parallel with the United States' post-Vietnam situation, when the Richard M.
NEWS
April 11, 1988
Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev told Palestine Liberation Organization chief Yasser Arafat in a Moscow meeting that Israel's security and statehood are as important in any Mideast peace settlement as similar rights for Palestinians, the official Tass news agency said. Gorbachev was quoted as saying that the Soviets would prefer a settlement that includes the withdrawal of Israeli troops from the territories occupied after the 1967 Six-Day War, Palestinian self-determination and a U.N.
NEWS
June 24, 1988 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
The Reagan Administration, in a sharp break with a longstanding American policy of trying to minimize Soviet influence in the Middle East, is urging Moscow to help mediate the Arab-Israeli conflict, a step that could require the Soviets to make the same sort of controversial choices that the United States frequently has had to make in recent years. Frustrated Administration officials maintain that Soviet leader Mikhail S.
NEWS
May 27, 1988 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writers
With the Soviet evacuation of Afghanistan giving President Reagan the first dramatic success for his policy of backing anti-communist insurgencies in the Third World, American strategists hope to make the once-neglected subject of regional conflicts into a centerpiece for the Moscow summit. And for once, U.S. hopes may run parallel to the thinking in Moscow. Kremlin leader Mikhail S.
NEWS
April 20, 1988 | ROBERT C. TOTH, Times Staff Writer
Officials traveling with Secretary of State George P. Shultz to Moscow this week will be looking for signs that the Soviets, in the wake of their Afghanistan withdrawal, will be intent on taking a strategic initiative in foreign affairs to ease their Afghan defeat. Some Reagan Administration officials are drawing a parallel with the United States' post-Vietnam situation, when the Richard M.
NEWS
April 11, 1988
Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev told Palestine Liberation Organization chief Yasser Arafat in a Moscow meeting that Israel's security and statehood are as important in any Mideast peace settlement as similar rights for Palestinians, the official Tass news agency said. Gorbachev was quoted as saying that the Soviets would prefer a settlement that includes the withdrawal of Israeli troops from the territories occupied after the 1967 Six-Day War, Palestinian self-determination and a U.N.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|