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NEWS
February 27, 1991 | DAVID LAMB and WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Although some observers have characterized the Persian Gulf War as a high-tech effort the likes of which have never been seen, the current campaign, in several diplomatic and military fashions, recalls some historical precedents of past Arab failures, analysts say.
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NEWS
October 30, 1991 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tuesday's new-style summit between President Bush and Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev was intended as a celebration of global cooperation between the two old superpowers. Instead, it turned into a stark illustration of the Soviet Union's precipitous decline and raised an unintended question: Now that a U.S.-Soviet partnership is finally possible, is it worth much?
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NEWS
April 25, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
During the end of his third frustrating tour of the Mideast in six weeks, Secretary of State James A. Baker III conceded Wednesday that he is still far from persuading Syria and Israel to begin peace talks. Although Baker sought to put the best possible face on his meetings in Damascus, he showed flashes of irritation at the plodding diplomatic pace.
NEWS
April 26, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It took a bit of prodding, but Soviet Foreign Minister Alexander A. Bessmertnykh publicly signed up Thursday as co-sponsor of the Middle East peace conference that Secretary of State James A. Baker III is trying to sell to Israel and its Arab adversaries. Moscow's agreement to participate was a small victory, but it ranks as the biggest prize so far of Baker's Middle East shuttle, which has kept him on the road for 17 of the last 20 days. But even that did not come easily.
NEWS
March 31, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze, urging new efforts for a broad Middle East peace in the wake of the Persian Gulf War, proposed in an interview published today that the U.N. Security Council's permanent members now begin intense collaboration on the Arab-Israeli conflict. Shevardnadze, now head of the new Soviet Foreign Policy Assn., also called for the appointment of a special U.N.
NEWS
October 30, 1991 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tuesday's new-style summit between President Bush and Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev was intended as a celebration of global cooperation between the two old superpowers. Instead, it turned into a stark illustration of the Soviet Union's precipitous decline and raised an unintended question: Now that a U.S.-Soviet partnership is finally possible, is it worth much?
NEWS
February 26, 1989 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
Foreign Minister Moshe Arens said Saturday that in talks with his Soviet counterpart last week, he unsuccessfully urged Moscow to drop its proposal for an international conference on Middle East peace. He also urged the Soviets to stop using the lure of fully restored diplomatic relations to try to get Israel to join such talks. Interviewed on government radio, Arens gave a vivid account of his conversation Wednesday in Cairo with the Kremlin's Eduard A. Shevardnadze.
NEWS
January 11, 1989 | From a Times Staff Writer
A senior Soviet diplomat said Tuesday that his government will not support demands by Arab nations that a ban on chemical warfare be linked to a ban on nuclear weapons. Deputy Foreign Minister Viktor P. Karpov told a news conference that he hopes a 145-nation conference on banning chemical warfare will reach a consensus today, the closing day of the conference. Asked whether the linkage issue will prevent a general agreement, Karpov replied, "This conference is doomed for success."
NEWS
April 26, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It took a bit of prodding, but Soviet Foreign Minister Alexander A. Bessmertnykh publicly signed up Thursday as co-sponsor of the Middle East peace conference that Secretary of State James A. Baker III is trying to sell to Israel and its Arab adversaries. Moscow's agreement to participate was a small victory, but it ranks as the biggest prize so far of Baker's Middle East shuttle, which has kept him on the road for 17 of the last 20 days. But even that did not come easily.
NEWS
February 20, 1990 | DOYLE MCMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet Union, retreating before pressure from Arab countries, has scrapped a deal to allow direct airline flights from Moscow to Tel Aviv to carry thousands of Soviet Jews emigrating to Israel, U.S. officials said today. The effect of the Soviet decision will be to delay the emigration of hundreds--and perhaps thousands--of Jews because of a longstanding shortage of space on airlines leaving Moscow, the officials said.
NEWS
April 25, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
During the end of his third frustrating tour of the Mideast in six weeks, Secretary of State James A. Baker III conceded Wednesday that he is still far from persuading Syria and Israel to begin peace talks. Although Baker sought to put the best possible face on his meetings in Damascus, he showed flashes of irritation at the plodding diplomatic pace.
NEWS
March 31, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze, urging new efforts for a broad Middle East peace in the wake of the Persian Gulf War, proposed in an interview published today that the U.N. Security Council's permanent members now begin intense collaboration on the Arab-Israeli conflict. Shevardnadze, now head of the new Soviet Foreign Policy Assn., also called for the appointment of a special U.N.
NEWS
February 27, 1991 | DAVID LAMB and WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Although some observers have characterized the Persian Gulf War as a high-tech effort the likes of which have never been seen, the current campaign, in several diplomatic and military fashions, recalls some historical precedents of past Arab failures, analysts say.
NEWS
February 21, 1991 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bedeviled by a lack of details about the current Soviet efforts to arrange an end to the Persian Gulf War before it turns to an expected brutal ground phase, most Arab nations Wednesday cautiously stuck to previous positions and waited for other countries, namely the United States and Iraq, to make the final decisions.
NEWS
January 27, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet Union, afraid that the war in the Persian Gulf could spread through the Middle East and become protracted with mounting casualties, is stepping up its diplomatic efforts to secure a political resolution, probably based on a cease-fire and Iraq's withdrawal from Kuwait, a senior member of the Soviet leadership said Saturday. Alexander S.
NEWS
February 20, 1990 | DOYLE MCMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet Union, retreating before pressure from Arab countries, has scrapped a deal to allow direct airline flights from Moscow to Tel Aviv to carry thousands of Soviet Jews emigrating to Israel, U.S. officials said today. The effect of the Soviet decision will be to delay the emigration of hundreds--and perhaps thousands--of Jews because of a longstanding shortage of space on airlines leaving Moscow, the officials said.
NEWS
February 21, 1991 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bedeviled by a lack of details about the current Soviet efforts to arrange an end to the Persian Gulf War before it turns to an expected brutal ground phase, most Arab nations Wednesday cautiously stuck to previous positions and waited for other countries, namely the United States and Iraq, to make the final decisions.
NEWS
February 13, 1990 | DAN FISHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Faced with growing Muslim criticism that it is helping to drive Palestinians from their homes in the Israeli-occupied West Bank and Gaza Strip, the Soviet Union on Monday called for an urgent U.N. Security Council meeting to condemn Israel's policy of settling Soviet Jewish immigrants there. It also took the unusual step of calling on the United States to speed processing of applications from Soviet Jews who want to go to America so that more will have an alternative to Israel.
NEWS
February 13, 1990 | DAN FISHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Faced with growing Muslim criticism that it is helping to drive Palestinians from their homes in the Israeli-occupied West Bank and Gaza Strip, the Soviet Union on Monday called for an urgent U.N. Security Council meeting to condemn Israel's policy of settling Soviet Jewish immigrants there. It also took the unusual step of calling on the United States to speed processing of applications from Soviet Jews who want to go to America so that more will have an alternative to Israel.
NEWS
February 26, 1989 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
Foreign Minister Moshe Arens said Saturday that in talks with his Soviet counterpart last week, he unsuccessfully urged Moscow to drop its proposal for an international conference on Middle East peace. He also urged the Soviets to stop using the lure of fully restored diplomatic relations to try to get Israel to join such talks. Interviewed on government radio, Arens gave a vivid account of his conversation Wednesday in Cairo with the Kremlin's Eduard A. Shevardnadze.
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