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NEWS
October 5, 1989
Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze proposed a broad new role for Moscow in Central America, offering to join the United States as a guarantor of a pact to limit the region's armies.
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NEWS
December 2, 1989
Following are some of the issues likely to be discussed by President Bush and Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev when they meet on warships in Marsaxlokk Bay: EASTERN EUROPE: The political upheaval in the Soviet-led East Bloc as Poland, Hungary, East Germany and Czechoslovakia move to lift the "Iron Curtain" and introduce democratic reforms.
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NEWS
March 8, 1989 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
Secretary of State James A. Baker III met with Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze on Tuesday and said the United States and the Soviet Union will try to agree in May on a date for resuming their suspended negotiations on strategic nuclear weapons. Shevardnadze said that he also expects to discuss the prospects and timing for a summit meeting between President Bush and Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev during the May meeting with Baker. U.S.
NEWS
November 27, 1989 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While the Berlin Wall has been transformed into a symbol of freedom and Eastern Europe is rapidly casting off the cloak of communism, elsewhere the Cold War is still being fought the old-fashioned way: Forces backed by Moscow and Washington kill each other in Third World trouble spots from Afghanistan to El Salvador. Yet, as President Bush and Soviet President Mikhail S.
NEWS
January 21, 1988 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writer
President Reagan, employing some of his sharpest language in recent months in support of the Contras, raised the specter Wednesday of a Communist Managua regime moving north and turning the Gulf of Mexico into an American version of the war-torn Persian Gulf if U.S. aid to the Nicaraguan rebels is cut off.
NEWS
December 2, 1989
Following are some of the issues likely to be discussed by President Bush and Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev when they meet on warships in Marsaxlokk Bay: EASTERN EUROPE: The political upheaval in the Soviet-led East Bloc as Poland, Hungary, East Germany and Czechoslovakia move to lift the "Iron Curtain" and introduce democratic reforms.
NEWS
November 27, 1989 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While the Berlin Wall has been transformed into a symbol of freedom and Eastern Europe is rapidly casting off the cloak of communism, elsewhere the Cold War is still being fought the old-fashioned way: Forces backed by Moscow and Washington kill each other in Third World trouble spots from Afghanistan to El Salvador. Yet, as President Bush and Soviet President Mikhail S.
NEWS
July 18, 1988 | ROBERT C. TOTH, Times Staff Writer
Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev's success at the recent Communist Party conference, particularly the proposed presidential system that would place him at the head of a powerful government as well as the Communist Party, strengthens his pursuit of a key goal: dispelling the West's perception that the Soviet Union poses a military threat. Although Gorbachev convened the conference to deal with domestic affairs, U.S.
NEWS
April 15, 1988 | MICHAEL WINES, Times Staff Writer
Costa Rican President Oscar Arias Sanchez charged the Soviet Union on Thursday with aiding leftist rebels in defiance of a Central American peace accord and urged President Reagan to press the issue with Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev at their Moscow summit meeting late next month. Speaking to the annual meeting of the American Society of Newspaper Editors, Arias said he is "very disappointed" with Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze.
NEWS
January 15, 1988 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
President Oscar Arias Sanchez said Thursday that his Central American peace plan faces imminent collapse unless Nicaragua acts immediately to comply with its requirements for democratic reform. On the eve of a regional summit to judge results of the five-nation peace accord he wrote, Arias said that U.S. aid to Nicaraguan rebels and the superpower rivalry in the region are also obstacles to cease-fires in its three guerrilla wars.
NEWS
October 5, 1989
Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze proposed a broad new role for Moscow in Central America, offering to join the United States as a guarantor of a pact to limit the region's armies.
NEWS
March 8, 1989 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
Secretary of State James A. Baker III met with Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze on Tuesday and said the United States and the Soviet Union will try to agree in May on a date for resuming their suspended negotiations on strategic nuclear weapons. Shevardnadze said that he also expects to discuss the prospects and timing for a summit meeting between President Bush and Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev during the May meeting with Baker. U.S.
NEWS
July 18, 1988 | ROBERT C. TOTH, Times Staff Writer
Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev's success at the recent Communist Party conference, particularly the proposed presidential system that would place him at the head of a powerful government as well as the Communist Party, strengthens his pursuit of a key goal: dispelling the West's perception that the Soviet Union poses a military threat. Although Gorbachev convened the conference to deal with domestic affairs, U.S.
NEWS
April 15, 1988 | MICHAEL WINES, Times Staff Writer
Costa Rican President Oscar Arias Sanchez charged the Soviet Union on Thursday with aiding leftist rebels in defiance of a Central American peace accord and urged President Reagan to press the issue with Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev at their Moscow summit meeting late next month. Speaking to the annual meeting of the American Society of Newspaper Editors, Arias said he is "very disappointed" with Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze.
NEWS
January 21, 1988 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writer
President Reagan, employing some of his sharpest language in recent months in support of the Contras, raised the specter Wednesday of a Communist Managua regime moving north and turning the Gulf of Mexico into an American version of the war-torn Persian Gulf if U.S. aid to the Nicaraguan rebels is cut off.
NEWS
January 15, 1988 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
President Oscar Arias Sanchez said Thursday that his Central American peace plan faces imminent collapse unless Nicaragua acts immediately to comply with its requirements for democratic reform. On the eve of a regional summit to judge results of the five-nation peace accord he wrote, Arias said that U.S. aid to Nicaraguan rebels and the superpower rivalry in the region are also obstacles to cease-fires in its three guerrilla wars.
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