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NEWS
February 16, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A U.S. congressional delegation said Friday that the Soviet Union will have to give up some of its territory unless it plans to use Stalinist methods to retain its independence-seeking republics. Rep. Steny H. Hoyer (D-Md.), the delegation chairman, said that the momentum for independence has grown so strong in the Baltic republics of Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania, which the U.S. lawmakers had just visited, that only repression and military force could keep them in the Soviet Union.
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NEWS
February 16, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A U.S. congressional delegation said Friday that the Soviet Union will have to give up some of its territory unless it plans to use Stalinist methods to retain its independence-seeking republics. Rep. Steny H. Hoyer (D-Md.), the delegation chairman, said that the momentum for independence has grown so strong in the Baltic republics of Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania, which the U.S. lawmakers had just visited, that only repression and military force could keep them in the Soviet Union.
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NEWS
January 14, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After the blitz attacks by the Soviet army that caused great carnage and shocked the world, the Lithuanian government reached an agreement with military commanders late Sunday to avert more bloodshed, and the thousands of Lithuanian nationalists forming a human wall to protect their Parliament began to disperse.
BUSINESS
January 15, 1991 | JOEL HAVEMANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Foreign ministers of the 12 European Community nations threatened Monday to withhold $520 million in promised technical assistance to the Soviet Union if Soviet troops continue to attack civilians in the rebellious Baltic provinces.
NEWS
January 14, 1991 | JUDY PASTERNAK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hundreds of protesters of Lithuanian heritage gathered Sunday at a Silver Lake church to worry. Wearing black ribbons of mourning for the 13 killed Saturday by Soviet troops and lapel pins in the colors of the national flag, they rallied on the front steps of St. Casimir's, a Lithuanian Roman Catholic parish. Luana Masiulis was there, but her thoughts were elsewhere.
NEWS
January 14, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fear and anger swept the Soviet Union on Sunday as people learned of the army's bloody clash with Lithuanian nationalists, and thousands protested in rallies against what they called an impending dictatorship. "We are witnessing the establishment of a dictatorship by the most reactionary circles of our society," Yuri N. Afanasyev, a historian and radical member of the Congress of People's Deputies, told a crowd of 3,000 gathered outside the Kremlin.
BUSINESS
January 15, 1991 | JOEL HAVEMANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Foreign ministers of the 12 European Community nations threatened Monday to withhold $520 million in promised technical assistance to the Soviet Union if Soviet troops continue to attack civilians in the rebellious Baltic provinces.
NEWS
January 14, 1991 | WILLIAM J. EATON and DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Condemning the Soviets' bloody crackdown in Lithuania, President Bush warned Sunday that further armed repression could reverse years of unprecedented progress in Soviet-American relations. His top aides said it also jeopardized Moscow summit talks set for next month. Bush appealed to Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev to halt the violence and return to peaceful negotiations to resolve the Kremlin's dispute with the breakaway Baltic republic over its bid for independence from Moscow.
NEWS
May 31, 1990 | GEORGE SKELTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev sits down to begin negotiations with President Bush today he will be representing Soviet citizens who now regard the United States as only a small threat but are very nervous about Germany's unification, The Los Angeles Times Poll found. The Soviet people emphatically back Gorbachev's insistence, expected to be reiterated in the summit talks, that the new Germany not be a military partner of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization.
NEWS
January 14, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet army's brutal crackdown on the Baltic republic of Lithuania over the weekend poses a question even more troubling than the tragic events themselves: Has President Mikhail S. Gorbachev swung over to the hard-right with the Soviet military and security forces, or have they overtaken him to act alone? At stake is the future of the Soviet Union as a pluralist society dedicated to the democratic ideals that Gorbachev has espoused since he assumed the Soviet leadership nearly six years ago.
NEWS
January 14, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After the blitz attacks by the Soviet army that caused great carnage and shocked the world, the Lithuanian government reached an agreement with military commanders late Sunday to avert more bloodshed, and the thousands of Lithuanian nationalists forming a human wall to protect their Parliament began to disperse.
NEWS
January 14, 1991 | JUDY PASTERNAK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hundreds of protesters of Lithuanian heritage gathered Sunday at a Silver Lake church to worry. Wearing black ribbons of mourning for the 13 killed Saturday by Soviet troops and lapel pins in the colors of the national flag, they rallied on the front steps of St. Casimir's, a Lithuanian Roman Catholic parish. Luana Masiulis was there, but her thoughts were elsewhere.
NEWS
January 14, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fear and anger swept the Soviet Union on Sunday as people learned of the army's bloody clash with Lithuanian nationalists, and thousands protested in rallies against what they called an impending dictatorship. "We are witnessing the establishment of a dictatorship by the most reactionary circles of our society," Yuri N. Afanasyev, a historian and radical member of the Congress of People's Deputies, told a crowd of 3,000 gathered outside the Kremlin.
NEWS
January 14, 1991 | WILLIAM J. EATON and DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Condemning the Soviets' bloody crackdown in Lithuania, President Bush warned Sunday that further armed repression could reverse years of unprecedented progress in Soviet-American relations. His top aides said it also jeopardized Moscow summit talks set for next month. Bush appealed to Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev to halt the violence and return to peaceful negotiations to resolve the Kremlin's dispute with the breakaway Baltic republic over its bid for independence from Moscow.
NEWS
January 14, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet army's brutal crackdown on the Baltic republic of Lithuania over the weekend poses a question even more troubling than the tragic events themselves: Has President Mikhail S. Gorbachev swung over to the hard-right with the Soviet military and security forces, or have they overtaken him to act alone? At stake is the future of the Soviet Union as a pluralist society dedicated to the democratic ideals that Gorbachev has espoused since he assumed the Soviet leadership nearly six years ago.
NEWS
January 14, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviet soldiers laughed before they fired automatic weapons at Lithuanian nationalists. Without warning, they shot people in the back. They grabbed axes and bludgeoned 20 people on the head. Survivors of the Soviet army's bloody overnight assault on the Vilnius television tower and broadcast center spoke of such acts of brutality by soldiers sent in with tanks and armored personnel carriers to capture the installations.
NEWS
January 14, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviet soldiers laughed before they fired automatic weapons at Lithuanian nationalists. Without warning, they shot people in the back. They grabbed axes and bludgeoned 20 people on the head. Survivors of the Soviet army's bloody overnight assault on the Vilnius television tower and broadcast center spoke of such acts of brutality by soldiers sent in with tanks and armored personnel carriers to capture the installations.
NEWS
March 20, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet government, acting under orders from President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, moved Monday to assert its authority in Lithuania and prevent the small Baltic republic from implementing plans to secede from the Soviet Union. Prime Minister Nikolai I. Ryzhkov instructed central government ministries, including the KGB, the Soviet security agency, to act immediately to stop Lithuania from carrying out a program that would disengage the republic's economy from that of the Soviet Union as a whole.
NEWS
May 31, 1990 | GEORGE SKELTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev sits down to begin negotiations with President Bush today he will be representing Soviet citizens who now regard the United States as only a small threat but are very nervous about Germany's unification, The Los Angeles Times Poll found. The Soviet people emphatically back Gorbachev's insistence, expected to be reiterated in the summit talks, that the new Germany not be a military partner of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization.
NEWS
March 20, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet government, acting under orders from President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, moved Monday to assert its authority in Lithuania and prevent the small Baltic republic from implementing plans to secede from the Soviet Union. Prime Minister Nikolai I. Ryzhkov instructed central government ministries, including the KGB, the Soviet security agency, to act immediately to stop Lithuania from carrying out a program that would disengage the republic's economy from that of the Soviet Union as a whole.
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